German, European Union and South Korean officials are giving automakers and the countries they work with a lot of grief over continued accusations of emissions-testing cheating efforts. Naturally, Volkswagen is the subject of further scrutiny, both in Germany and South Korea because of its diesel-emissions-testing scandal. Meanwhile, the European Union is holding seven of its member countries' proverbial feet to the fire for not properly overseeing those testing efforts.

Germany's Transport Ministry and Federal Motor Transport Authority are after VW's Porsche division, Bloomberg News says. Porsche allegedly engaged in its own emissions-testing cheating efforts, programming some cars to reduce emissions when the lack of steering movement indicates that the car may be in the process of being tested. A Porsche spokesman denied the accusation to Bloomberg, and said the company is cooperating with the probe.

Meanwhile, Volkswagen, which has been subject to $19 billion in fines and levies (and counting) after programming about 11 million of its diesel vehicles to cheat emissions-testing systems, continues to receive more flack in South Korea. That country, which has already fined the automaker about $15 million over the issue, may fine the company another $32 million for alleged false advertising of its vehicles' fuel-economy figures, according to Reuters. South Korea is also pursuing criminal charges against five current and ex-VW executives.

Finally, in the all-blame-rolls-downhill-category, the European Union is now taking seven of its member countries to task for what it says is insufficient oversight of the emissions-testing process for their new vehicles, Reuters said in a separate article. The EU may take legal action against Germany, Spain, Luxembourg, Czech Republic, Lithuania, Greece, and — of course — Great Britain. So far, officials with both Germany and Great Britain defended their policies

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