• Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
  • Image Credit: Cadillac
Cadillac is in the midst of some big changes. It's got a new chief executive. It's taking some distance from parent company General Motors and moving to a new headquarters in New York. And it's instituting a new naming scheme that will allow not only for a more clear progression in its lineup, but also for more models. But that's not the end of the story. Not by a long shot.

Speaking with Automobile magazine, Cadillac's new president Johan de Nysschen revealed his intention to develop several new models and powertrains. For starters, he does not want Cadillac to continue borrowing engines from the GM parts bin, but intends to develop a new range of engines specifically for the luxury automaker. The program will likely start with smaller-capacity engines but eventually lead to new V8s as well, taking the place of the long-serving Northstar engine that finally ended its lifespan a few years ago after some two decades of production. Along with other technologies, de Nysschen envisions possibly sharing these powertrains with other GM divisions, but developing them first and foremost for Cadillac.

The bigger question, however, is where those engines would go, and de Nysschen had some thoughts to share on that front as well. For starters, the former Infiniti and Audi exec sees room for an even bigger sedan above the upcoming new CT6 that will cap the current range. Maybe even two of them. But that's not all. Johan wants to see Cadillac get (back) into the sports car game with a new halo model or two – something it hasn't really done since the Corvette-based XLR roadster. A pair of new crossovers are also said to be in the works, flanking the SRX on both sides with smaller and larger models.

All of these plans de Nysschen hopes to get up and running within the next ten to fifteen years before he needs to retire. They're ambitious plans, to be certain, and paint a picture of a resurgent Cadillac that aims to once again become the world standard.

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