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As its current chief executive Matthias Muller steps up to run the entire Volkswagen Group in the wake of the diesel emissions scandal, Porsche has named production and logistics chief Dr. Oliver Blume as its new CEO.


Tim Tozer is leaving his positions as chairman and managing director of Vauxhall and CEO of Opel Ireland. In his place, GM has named Opel exec Rory Harvey to the posts with immediate effect.


The Executive Committee of Volkswagen's Supervisory Board recommends the renewal of Martin Winterkorn's contract to remain CEO for another three years.


Toshihiro Suzuki, currently an executive vice president of his family's company, has been named its president and chief operating officer. His father remains chairman and CEO.


Fortune's new World's Greatest Leaders list includes a few automotive bosses. GM CEO Mary Barra and Tesla boss Elon Musk are mixed in with people like Pope Francis and Apple leader Tim Cook.


The time has come for a changing of the guard at Honda, as current president & CEO Takanobu Ito prepares to step down and cede control to Takahiro Hachigo, a veteran R&D engineer with more global experience.


With Finances In Order, It's Time For Innovative Future Products

On May 1st, Matt Levatich will take over as the next CEO of Harley-Davidson. He will inherit a brand in solid financial shape, but there are still many tough roads ahead for the American motorcycle manufacturer.


Big changes are afoot in the top ranks at BMW, as the Bavarian automaker has announced not just one, but several appointments in the top floors of its towering headquarters in Munich in what the company itself is referring as "a generational change" in its leadership.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is about to lose one of its top executives as the president of Maserati North America, Pete Grady, has announced his retirement.


Ferrari is undergoing a big shakeup, and not just on the Formula One racing grid. It's just parted ways with its longtime chairman, is being spun off from the rest of the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles group and will soon launch its initial public offering on the stock market. But one thing it's not about to change at this point is its CEO.


Company outfits cars with bullet-proof windshields and more

This CEO is so confident his product will protect buyers from gunfire he will literally stand behind it.


Taking charge of a major corporation will never be without its challenges, and one of those – as Honda CEO Takanobu Ito is finding out – is filling the big shoes of those that came before. Ito's predecessors are apparently not pleased with what he's doing to the company, and are wasting no time in telling him so.


Holden had a crisis of leadership over the past few years. GM's Australian division had three chief executives in as many years, before Mike Devereux steered it through a period of relative stability for the better part of three years. Devereux was succeeded earlier this year by Gerry Dorizas, but after less than eight months on the job, Dorizas is stepping down, too.


Aston Martin has been without a helmsman since Ulrich Bez stepped down from the chief executive office at the end of last year to serve as non-executive chairman in a semi-retired ambassadorial capacity. The British automaker, now on the cusp of a new era, has been running without a CEO since, but has now named Bez's replacement in Andy Palmer.


Takashi Yamanouchi has been with Mazda for a long time. He signed on with the Japanese automaker in April 1967 – one month after graduating from Keio University – and rose through the ranks over the years. By 1996 he was named to the company's board of directors. In 2008 he was named president and CEO, an office he held until 2013, after which he handed over the day-to-day reins to Masamichi Kogai and took up the seat at the head of the board room to serve as the company's chairman.


It's been about two years since DRB-Hicom took over Proton, and through it Lotus. One of its first courses of action was to fire the existing CEO, Dany Bahar, and proceed to scrap most if not all of his (arguably over-) ambitious plans. In his place they put one of their own – Aslam Farikullah – as Chief Operation Officer, but now the Malaysian-owned British automaker has attracted an industry heavyweight to lead it into the future.


Mary Barra has been CEO of GM for less than a month, but she's already receiving major accolades. Barra took the top spot in Fortune magazine's first list of the 50 Global Most Powerful Women in Business, ahead of Ginni Rometty, the chairman and CEO of IBM, in second place and Indra Nooyi, the CEO of Pepsi, in third.


Akerson himself previously noted that a female CEO at one of the Detroit Three was "inevitable."


Already there are many signs that suggest General Motors CEO Dan Akerson will retire next year, but he hasn't formally announced his plans to GM's board, The Economic Times reports, and the search for a new CEO apparently hasn't started. If Akerson retires next year, as is speculated, the move would come sooner than when was expected when he took the job back in 2010.


Mary Barra, the current Executive Vice President, Global Product Development for General Motors and widely believed to be a leading candidate to succeed current GM CEO Dan Akerson, has been named to the Fortune's Top 50 Women in Business list for the second year in a row.

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