2013 Acura RDX

MSRP ?

$34,320 - $35,720
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Engine Engine 3.5LV-6
MPG MPG 19 City / 27 Hwy
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2013 RDX Overview

Bucking The Downsizing Trend For All The Right Reasons Sometimes in life, you hit the nail right on the head, sink a hole-in-one or strike a perfect bullseye. It happens in all walks of life – from the original Star Wars trilogy to the Apple iPod. It even happens from time to time in the automotive realm. Take, for instance, the 1965 Ford Mustang or the original Acura Legend. Other times, we're not so lucky. Like the ill-begotten Star Wars prequel trilogy, the automotive world has played host to a long line of underwhelming encores. The Mustang II comes to mind, and so does the Acura RL. Of course, every so often, automakers release a car to market that's just isn't quite fully baked, like the ill-timed and poorly received Edsel from Ford. Though not nearly as obvious, the first-generation Acura RDX falls into this unfortunate camp. Originally marketed to the upwardly mobile male Gen-X population – a guy Acura named Jason back in 2006 – it turns out that well-to-do, tech-savvy men aren't actually all that interested in an entry-level premium crossover from Honda's luxury division. And that's why, for 2013, the Acura RDX is being re-aimed at the heart of the market: namely, baby boomers and young couples – defined by Acura as DINKS – "Dual-Income, No Kids" – who prefer quiet, comfortable and composed to quick, nimble and raucous. The transformation of the Acura RDX begins with its exterior. In place of the pug-nosed look of the original – made necessary in part by the inclusion of an intercooler and its assorted plumbing – is a more refined, upscale appearance. There's still no mistaking the RDX for anything but an Acura, due primarily to the large metallic fascia up front and the crisply angular styling down its flanks and hind quarters. A faux spoiler of sorts is formed by the shape of the D-pillar and the top of the liftback, lending an air of sportiness missing in much of this segment. Growing an inch or so in every direction, the 2013 Acura RDX's cabin is endowed with more space for passengers and cargo. At 103.5 cubic feet of total volume, the RDX offers more room than any of its closest competitors, who are, as defined by Acura, the Audi Q5, BMW X3, Cadillac SRX and Mercedes-Benz GLK. We'd add the Lexus RX 350 to that list, and it also has less overall room inside. One notable change to the RDX formula is a redesigned cargo opening. At 48.8 inches, it's a full 6.5 inches wider than before, and without any odd contours or shapes, it's much easier to load large and bulky items into the rear cargo area where there's 26.1 cubic feet of storage with the second row up, and 76.9 cubic feet with it stowed. Acura has redesigned the interior of the new RDX to feel more open and spacious, utilizing deep cutouts in the dash in front of both the driver and passenger. The …
Full Review

2013 RDX Overview

Bucking The Downsizing Trend For All The Right Reasons Sometimes in life, you hit the nail right on the head, sink a hole-in-one or strike a perfect bullseye. It happens in all walks of life – from the original Star Wars trilogy to the Apple iPod. It even happens from time to time in the automotive realm. Take, for instance, the 1965 Ford Mustang or the original Acura Legend. Other times, we're not so lucky. Like the ill-begotten Star Wars prequel trilogy, the automotive world has played host to a long line of underwhelming encores. The Mustang II comes to mind, and so does the Acura RL. Of course, every so often, automakers release a car to market that's just isn't quite fully baked, like the ill-timed and poorly received Edsel from Ford. Though not nearly as obvious, the first-generation Acura RDX falls into this unfortunate camp. Originally marketed to the upwardly mobile male Gen-X population – a guy Acura named Jason back in 2006 – it turns out that well-to-do, tech-savvy men aren't actually all that interested in an entry-level premium crossover from Honda's luxury division. And that's why, for 2013, the Acura RDX is being re-aimed at the heart of the market: namely, baby boomers and young couples – defined by Acura as DINKS – "Dual-Income, No Kids" – who prefer quiet, comfortable and composed to quick, nimble and raucous. The transformation of the Acura RDX begins with its exterior. In place of the pug-nosed look of the original – made necessary in part by the inclusion of an intercooler and its assorted plumbing – is a more refined, upscale appearance. There's still no mistaking the RDX for anything but an Acura, due primarily to the large metallic fascia up front and the crisply angular styling down its flanks and hind quarters. A faux spoiler of sorts is formed by the shape of the D-pillar and the top of the liftback, lending an air of sportiness missing in much of this segment. Growing an inch or so in every direction, the 2013 Acura RDX's cabin is endowed with more space for passengers and cargo. At 103.5 cubic feet of total volume, the RDX offers more room than any of its closest competitors, who are, as defined by Acura, the Audi Q5, BMW X3, Cadillac SRX and Mercedes-Benz GLK. We'd add the Lexus RX 350 to that list, and it also has less overall room inside. One notable change to the RDX formula is a redesigned cargo opening. At 48.8 inches, it's a full 6.5 inches wider than before, and without any odd contours or shapes, it's much easier to load large and bulky items into the rear cargo area where there's 26.1 cubic feet of storage with the second row up, and 76.9 cubic feet with it stowed. Acura has redesigned the interior of the new RDX to feel more open and spacious, utilizing deep cutouts in the dash in front of both the driver and passenger. The …Hide Full Review