2010 Volkswagen GTI

MSRP ?

$23,465 - $24,070
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 31 Hwy
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2010 GTI Overview

2010 Volkswagen GTI – click above for high-res image gallery In 1983, Run-DMC was fresh (which meant dope), Volvo 760 Turbos weighed 3,300 pounds and the 2,200-pound Volkswagen GTI made its U.S. debut. In 2010, the Rabbit-turned-Golf entered its sixth generation and attempted to draw a clear line to the first-generation car. The historical link has been made especially clear in the 2010 Volkswagen GTI, though it's gone through the typical changes you face when you hit your 30s. The GTI is now 1,000 pounds porkier, but it's still as slick as a greased pig when it comes to handling. Inside, there's plaid seat upholstery and higher-quality materials. Just like it was back in '83, the underhood motivation is only available from a four-cylinder, a change from recent generations that could be stuffed with Volkswagen's VR6. At a glance, the 2010 model promises to be more visceral than its direct predecessors, but does it come anywhere near the primal magic of the original, or is it just playing dress-up? Click through to the jump to find out. %Gallery-90125% Photos by John Neff / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. By the time the GTI came Stateside, with its square headlamps and NHTSA-approved bumpers, the sharply-creased hatchback was no longer in the business of breaking any new stylistic ground. That much holds true for the 2010 Volkswagen GTI as well. It's handsome and smoothly styled with the instantly-recognizable profile of a Volkswagen two-box. In truth, this latest generation of GTI doesn't appear hugely different than its predecessor. The front and rear light clusters are revised, with less startled-looking headlamps and more horizontal taillights. The front fascia and grille are also redone on a more horizontal theme and red stripes at the top and bottom of the new grille are a touch deftly lifted from 1983. While evolutionary, changes wrought between MkV and MkVI are successful in smoothing and modernizing the GTI. Inside, it's more of the same updated-retro theme. The standard seats fitted to our tester arrived finished in Interlagos Plaid upholstery. Tartan fabric still carries echoes of the 1970s and is as polarizing as the Bacon Explosion. Some love it, but if you don't, VW offers upgraded sport seats with partial leather upholstery as part of the $2,185 Autobahn package, which also adds a power sunroof. Very few people will complain about front seat space in the GTI, though anyone who has to climb into the back might gripe about the hike. In two-door form, that means climbing in and over the sill, so carpoolers or family users would do best to choose the five-door version, although it costs around $600 more. Once gluteals are planted on the cushion in the second row, passengers will find it relatively comfy back there, but claustrophobes will definitely want the extra doors. The 15.3 cubic feet of cargo space is useful and accessible thanks to the GTI's classic hatch profile; this a well-rounded little hellraiser that can haul both people and cargo at ascot-flipping …
Full Review

2010 GTI Overview

2010 Volkswagen GTI – click above for high-res image gallery In 1983, Run-DMC was fresh (which meant dope), Volvo 760 Turbos weighed 3,300 pounds and the 2,200-pound Volkswagen GTI made its U.S. debut. In 2010, the Rabbit-turned-Golf entered its sixth generation and attempted to draw a clear line to the first-generation car. The historical link has been made especially clear in the 2010 Volkswagen GTI, though it's gone through the typical changes you face when you hit your 30s. The GTI is now 1,000 pounds porkier, but it's still as slick as a greased pig when it comes to handling. Inside, there's plaid seat upholstery and higher-quality materials. Just like it was back in '83, the underhood motivation is only available from a four-cylinder, a change from recent generations that could be stuffed with Volkswagen's VR6. At a glance, the 2010 model promises to be more visceral than its direct predecessors, but does it come anywhere near the primal magic of the original, or is it just playing dress-up? Click through to the jump to find out. %Gallery-90125% Photos by John Neff / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. By the time the GTI came Stateside, with its square headlamps and NHTSA-approved bumpers, the sharply-creased hatchback was no longer in the business of breaking any new stylistic ground. That much holds true for the 2010 Volkswagen GTI as well. It's handsome and smoothly styled with the instantly-recognizable profile of a Volkswagen two-box. In truth, this latest generation of GTI doesn't appear hugely different than its predecessor. The front and rear light clusters are revised, with less startled-looking headlamps and more horizontal taillights. The front fascia and grille are also redone on a more horizontal theme and red stripes at the top and bottom of the new grille are a touch deftly lifted from 1983. While evolutionary, changes wrought between MkV and MkVI are successful in smoothing and modernizing the GTI. Inside, it's more of the same updated-retro theme. The standard seats fitted to our tester arrived finished in Interlagos Plaid upholstery. Tartan fabric still carries echoes of the 1970s and is as polarizing as the Bacon Explosion. Some love it, but if you don't, VW offers upgraded sport seats with partial leather upholstery as part of the $2,185 Autobahn package, which also adds a power sunroof. Very few people will complain about front seat space in the GTI, though anyone who has to climb into the back might gripe about the hike. In two-door form, that means climbing in and over the sill, so carpoolers or family users would do best to choose the five-door version, although it costs around $600 more. Once gluteals are planted on the cushion in the second row, passengers will find it relatively comfy back there, but claustrophobes will definitely want the extra doors. The 15.3 cubic feet of cargo space is useful and accessible thanks to the GTI's classic hatch profile; this a well-rounded little hellraiser that can haul both people and cargo at ascot-flipping …Hide Full Review