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The Nürburgring Nordschleife has the reputation as one of the most difficult tracks in the world to master – deservedly so. With 14 miles of roadway and about 160 corners over a massive amount of elevation change, the amount of grip can change from turn to turn. As the driver of the famous BMW Ring Taxi learned this weekend after a shunt into the barricades, the 'Ring can bite unsuspecting pros just as easily as amateurs.


BMW has a secret, and it's not telling. The brand's M Power blog is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the M5 and is taking a look back at previous models of its Autobahn-storming sedan, but it says that it will end "with a surprise." The celebration kicks off with a short video showing the latest M5 making some smoky donuts.


The band of misfits from Petrolicious have set their lenses on something truly delectable: Randy Balingit-Hartmann's 1989 BMW M5. The car is spotlessly clean, but it hasn't been sealed away in a garage somewhere for posterity. Balingit-Hartmann bought his M5 brand new, and it was one of the first models in Southern California.


In September of 2011, Chinese drifter Wang Qi broke the Guinness record for the world's longest sustained drift, doing 13 laps inside the Olympic Center Stadium in Tianlin, China for 5,802.3 meters. That was broken in February of this year by Abdo Feghali in Abu Dhabi drifting a new Chevrolet Camaro around a skidpad for 11,180 meters – almost seven miles. In March, BMW decided it wanted the record "back in the US," and set up a course at its BMW Performance Driving School near Greenville,


BMW just can't stand the thought of the world record for the longest drift winding up in the hands of someone else. The German automaker is set to take a crack at setting a new record by blowing the old one straight out of the water. A driver in China holds the current title after kicking a car sideways for a full 3.6 miles. Now, on May 11, BMW Performance Driving Instructor Johan Schwartz will attempt to pitch a BMW M5 sideways for some 40 miles as part of a stunt to raise funds for the BMW Pro


There are many burning questions these days to which we seek answers: who will win the upcoming presidential election? How does the Tesla Model S Performance stack up against the BMW M5 on a drag strip? And, of course, who put the ram in the rama lama ding dong? While we can't speak to the either the political or metaphysical queries, we now have an answer to the automotive one.


It's not like we needed it, but the latest episode of Motor Trend's "Head 2 Head" is more proof that those who spend six-figures buy whatever they want (or more likely, they buy three or four of them), not necessarily what wins the spec war or a drag race.


Want to watch something strangely beautiful? We suggest the BMW M5 footage crafted by BMW of Canada in the video below. No scantily clad women, no overtly gratuitous tire smoke – just a 560-horsepower super sedan doing its best impression of a bullet.


The 70s were a definitive decade for music and movies. Fashion and cars, not so much. The 80s corrected one of those oversights, an era of ethereal supercars like the Porsche 959, game-changing exotics like the Ferrari Testarossa, and, best of all, everday cannons that offered mortals a generous portion of lairy thrills, such as Chris Harris' 1986 e28 BMW M5.


BMW has posted two teasers to YouTube, previewing M Performance versions of both the M3 and M5. These look to be specially produced for the UK market, and limited to just 30 units of each model in either red, white or blue.


Pushrods and overhead valves or dual overhead cams; naturally aspirated, turbocharged or supercharged; it simply doesn't matter – there's nothing quite like the sound of a powerful V8 engine. Or is there?


Pitting the Nissan GT-R against the all-new BMW M5 is ridiculous. They're two different beasts in two different classes with two different purposes. It's a cynical, SEO-optimized comparison. And even worse, it's already been done. But...


Okay, this is an easy one. If we told you to pick a performance winner between the Nissan GT-R and the BMW M5, we're guessing the vast majority of you would pick Godzilla to come out on top. Both vehicles feature over 500 horsepower, but the BMW weighs over 400 pounds more, and the GT-R counters with one of the world's most impressive all-wheel-drive systems.


The 2012 BMW M5 is something of an anomaly. Despite its size and weight, the big luxury sedan is actually quicker than its less corpulent sibling, the BMW M3, around a road course. With a 552-horsepower twin-turbo V8 engine capable of sucking down small communities, there's no arguing the M5's power. But fast cars aren't necessarily fun. Take the Jaguar XKR, for example. It's blisteringly quick, but comes saddled with a traction control system that requires an advanced degree in computer science


A German tuning outfit called PP-Performance has put the 2012 BMW M5 on a Maha dyno, and the numbers returned were 444 horsepower at the wheel, 553 at the engine, and a "corrected number" of 574 hp. Max torque came in at 532 pound-feet (721 Newton/meters).


'Tis the season for Christmas cards. Standing in the aisles at Hallmark or the local grocery store, spending endless hours searching for just the right bifold slip of paper to express your own vision of the Christmas Spirit for your significant other, your mom, your dad, your brothers and sisters, grandparents and that irritating guy from accounting. And then spending a ludicrous amount on the dozen cards you've collected at the checkout lane while not being completely happy with any of them. Yo


Vicki Butler-Henderson of Fifth Gear has taken the 2012 BMW M5 into her deft hands and massaged it oh-so-gently through the corners and curbing of southern France. All right, quite the opposite of "gently," instead preferring to put a billowing white chokehold on every single one of the M5's 560 horsepower and 502 pound-feet.

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