• Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
  • Image Credit: Seyth Miersma
Mercedes-AMG chairman Tobias Moers took a sip of water and pondered the question. It was a loaded one: Would his company consider building a hyper car to rival extreme machines like the Porsche 918 and Ferrari LaFerrari?

The short answer: not right now.

"Unfortunately, if we find we should do something like that, there's no capacity – there's no engineering capacity to do that – in the near future. So there's no chance for us [to do that]," he told Autoblog in an interview at the Los Angeles Auto Show.

AMG has capitalized on the rebounding global economy and strong demand for performance cars in the United States, China, and Europe, its most critical markets. It employs about 1,400 people, an astronomical leap from the 120 people who worked at AMG when Moers started in 1994.

AMG also announced plans this week to increase V12 engine production due to high demand. Production will move from the AMG base in Affalterbach to another Daimler site in Mannheim, Germany. The switch will free up capacity for AMG to build more V8 engines in Affalterbach.

Despite all of this growth, Moers said the company has priorities more pressing than a hypercar, like adding more extreme variants of its existing models. It also revealed the SL63 and SL65 AMG models this week in Los Angeles. "We're going to increase the family of the GT (shown above)," he said. "We're really busy with the next-generation E-Class, which will be the biggest step we've ever made from one generation E-Class to the next one regarding driving dynamics."

Moers also says a supercar doesn't make financial sense for AMG, though halo cars are traditionally done for brand building, rather than the bottom line. "We're not coming to that point. I think a hypercar is always bad on a business case," he said.

An AMG supercar is one of the industry's favorite rumors, and Moers admitted his customers are interested in the proposition. "In the recent past, I always thought like AMG ... is not in that level to be accepted in a hypercar, super, super, super sports car segment," he said. Talking with customers in all of our main markets, give[s] me a different view to that."

Related Video:

2017 Mercedes-Benz SL-Class | LAAS 2015 | Beauty-Roll

From Our Partners

You May Like
Links by Zergnet
Share This Photo X