• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
Ever since last month, a software update for the Model S has included the long-discussed Autosteer feature that, among other things, emits chimes as warning signals for potential lane departure and side collision threats. It also offers improved acceleration for the EV and a few other features. The Model S software release version 7.0 also includes an Autopark feature that allows for automated parallel parking. The software includes graphics that show the current speed limit, the location of surrounding cars, and the vehicle's path of travel.

Another great thing is that the software includes improved climate control, so when the driver is working up a sweat letting the car accelerate while his or her hands are off the wheel (not actually recommended, obviously) the air-conditioning is at least a little more effective to counteract the extra heat. Tesla representatives didn't immediately respond to a request for comment from AutoblogGreen.

Tesla chief Elon Musk said last month (via Twitter, of course) that the California-based automaker was getting ready to release software that would allow a limited version of autonomous driving. At the time, Musk hinted that one hurdle the company was dealing with was getting the car to recognized "low contrast lane markings" on the highway while driving at dusk, which, again, would give some drivers a little sweat on the brow while using Autosteer. The good news for Model S drivers is that these EVs will learn from each other, so as the problems get solved, the solutions will spread.

Earlier this year, Germany-based autoparts-making giant Bosch put out a rather optimistic video showing driverless technology, using lots of CGI effects.


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