The third-generation Audi TT coupe has made its debut here at the Geneva Motor Show, showing an evolutionary design for the German automaker's fashion-forward coupe. As expected, the new TT takes plenty of inspiration from the Sport Quattro Concept that debuted in Frankfurt last year, and it draws upon cues from the model's past two generations.

After seeing it in person, the Autoblog crew on-site in Geneva is sort of torn about the new model. It's crisp and well-proportioned, but in terms of its exterior design, it also doesn't come off like a significant generational leap forward – the aesthetic distance between the original TT and the second-generation model was quite a bit larger. Of course, it's hard to reimagine a design icon, and either way we'll have to wait until we see the car on the road to make final judgments.

Audi is offering a trio of engines for the new TT, including a 2.0-liter turbodiesel powerplant that's good for 184 horsepower, 280 pound-feet of torque and an excellent 56 miles per gallon. On the gasoline front, Audi is offering two versions of its well-liked 2.0-liter TSI turbo-four. The less-powerful spec still offers up a healthy 230 hp and 272 lb-ft of torque, while the higher-output 2.0T sends 310 hp and 280 lb-ft of twist to all four wheels in the TTS coupe. Potent stuff.

Inside, there's a brand-new interior with a fresh, modern design, incorporating the slick Virtual Cockpit that debuted at CES earlier this year and temperature controls mounted in the air vents, which lowers the cockpit's button count considerably. It certainly looks nice, and is decidedly more forward thinking than the exterior design, in our opinion.

All this discussion has us wondering: what generation of the TT design do you like best? Check out the videos below, vote in our poll and then have a look at a fresh set of TT pics in the gallery above.





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Emotion, dynamism and high-tech – The new Audi TT
- Audi TT and Audi TTS celebrate world premiere at Geneva Motor Show
- Compact sports car impresses with its design and driving dynamics
- Member of the Board of Management for Technical Development, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg: "Offering drivers a technology experience that is even more compelling"
INGOLSTADT, Germany, Mar 3, 2014 - A completely revised edition of a modern classic is ready to take center stage: The Audi TT and Audi TTS will celebrate their world premieres at the Geneva Motor Show (these vehicle are currently not available for sale. they do not yet have a general type approval and are therefore not covered by Directive 1999/94/EC.). The third generation of the compact sports car is again captivating, with its emotional design and dynamic qualities. The new Coupé is characterized by the use of innovative technologies in its engine and in its control and display concept, including the Audi virtual cockpit.

"The Audi TT is the epitome of an authentic design icon and a top-performance driving machine," explains Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, Member of the Board of Management of AUDI AG for Technical Development. "With the new generation, we are making this technology even easier for the driver to experience – just as they would expect from a real sports car."

Exterior design
When the first-generation Audi TT came on the market in 1998 it was a design revolution – its strictly geometrical, formally coherent design language made it an icon with huge charisma. For the third TT generation, the Audi designers have returned to many of these ideas and placed them in a new context that is as dynamic as it is diverse.

The front of the new TT is dominated by horizontal lines. The Singleframe grille is much broader and flatter than that of the previous model, with a powerful line dividing it into two zones. Starting in the top corners of the grille, sharp contours run in a V across the hood, which bears the four Audi rings – as on the Audi R8 high-performance sports car (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 14.9 – 12.4 (15.79 – 18.97 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 349 – 289 (561.66 – 465.10 g/mile). The air intakes feature struts that direct part of the flow away from the front to the flanks.

The flat headlights give the new TT's face a determined look. Xenon plus units are standard, and Audi can optionally provide LED headlights or ones in pioneering Audi Matrix LED technology, where the high beam is generated by controllable individual LEDs. On both versions, there is an unmistakable contour created by the separating strip in the headlights, which is illuminated by light guides.

The Matrix LED headlights consist of 12 LEDs and include another Audi innovation: dynamic turn signals that light up sequentially in the direction in which the driver is steering. The predictive cornering light uses navigation data to move the cone of light into the curve before the steering wheel is turned.

From the side, the new Audi TT is equally lean and muscular; it rests low on the road as if ready to pounce. At 4.18 meters (13.71 ft), the Coupé is almost exactly the same length as its predecessor, though its wheelbase has grown by 37 mm (1.46 in) to 2,505 mm (8.22 ft), making for especially short overhangs. It is 1,832 mm (6.01 ft) wide, and has the same height as the previous model at 1,353 mm (4.44 ft).

A lot of the details of the new Audi TT's profile are reminiscent of the first-generation of the modern classic. The contour of the sill creates a striking refracting edge, while the broad wheel arches form their own geometric bodies. The front wheel arch breaches the line of the hood, which continues over the door as a tornado line and runs almost horizontally through to the tail as a strong body shoulder.

The flat greenhouse gives the impression of being an independent unit and the slight kink in the rear side window gives it additional tension. The fuel flap on the right side panel is the classic circle and surrounded by socket screws; a light tap on the TT logo and the flap opens. This shape is again reminiscent of the first-generation TT. What is new is that there is no tank lid beneath the flap. This means that there is nothing to be unscrewed and the pump nozzle slots straight into the tank neck, just like in motor racing.

Specifically at the tail, horizontal lines underline the impression of the new TT's sporty width. Together with the LED and Audi Matrix LED headlights, the tail lights also have dynamic turn signals. Another parallel to the front headlights: the strip in the tail lights, which also form a daytime running light contour – another Audi innovation. The third brake light is an extremely narrow strip positioned under the edge of the rear spoiler. It plays an essential part in defining the tail light silhouette.

At a speed of 120 km/h (74.56 mph) a spoiler extends from the trunk lid to improve both air resistance and downforce. All models have two large round exhaust tailpipes. These are again reminiscent of the original TT. Like all Audi S models, the TTS exhales through four oval tailpipes.

The optional S line exterior package makes the design of the bumpers, air intakes, Singleframe grille, sills and the rear diffuser even sharper and sportier. And handling is even more dynamic, with 18" wheels and a body that rests 10 mm (0.39 in) lower.

Body
Lightweight construction is one of Audi's greatest areas of expertise. The second-generation Audi TT already featured an Audi Space Frame (ASF) body made from aluminum and steel. For the new TT, Audi has systematically taken this composite construction principle even further, in line with the idea: the right amount of the right mate


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 30 Comments
      Bob
      • 9 Months Ago
      The silvery TT in the photos: New "nano gray" or regular old "ice silver" or something else?
      Drizzy
      • 9 Months Ago
      Boooorrrrrriiiiiinnnnnggggg... It was originally a 2 door torch bearer, now there's the R8 & A/S/RS5 and it feels a little irrelevant. Audi, please stop with the "different links of the same 'non-emotional' sausage", and make a different... spicier parkour sausage.
      Scooter
      • 9 Months Ago
      What's most annoying about this car? Yes its pretty. Is it a breath of fresh air? Nope. Weeks of teasing for what is essentially, (on the outside) a reiteration of the same car. I haven't been alive that long, but it has been long enough to be quite familiar with the iconic TT. This definitely cements what I've already thought of Audi in the last few years. Just quit making cars and make head&tail lamps for a living. Seems to be the only thing the company is genuinely interested in.
        E85 450HP Forester
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Scooter
        Don't forget Crapysler is also interested on lamps, they are trying to sell cars based on stupid LEDs.
      sp33dklz
      • 9 Months Ago
      This should have been sold as a re-fresh, not an entirely new model. Can we have some new Audi designers please? This copy/paste isn't exciting anymore.
        Joey Franklin
        • 9 Months Ago
        @sp33dklz
        It's on a new platform and has lost weight and has a completely new interior. It's definitely not just a refresh, instantly recognizable as a TT and quite attractive in my opinion.
      ycnexu
      • 9 Months Ago
      No one buys this car. I think the problem is the weird, comical, unsporty design with a waistline too high and hood too short, mated to very serious Audi styling.
        Feurig
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ycnexu
        The reason no one buys the car is because nobody is looking at this segment. It's not practical by any means and people with the money for a second car typically have money for something more expensive.
      Billy Devine
      • 9 Months Ago
      Had the first gen years back. The thing was a beast in the snow with snow tires and Quattro..It loved snow! I always thought the first gen was ugly (upside down bathtub) on the outside but amazingly beautiful inside, this new TT is much better than the first and second gen for sure. Outside and inside!
        Bernard
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Billy Devine
        Any AWD car is a "beast in the snow."
          NeoReaper
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Bernard
          ive had 3 different generations of a4 quattros, an infiniti g with awd, and currently a 3 series xDrive. the AWD systems found in cars are not all created equal....
      Pascual Wawoe
      • 9 Months Ago
      in the promo video the announcer says that the first gen introduced a new design language, which it did, so they abandoned that new design language in the subsequent generations, making the car more generic. They should have taken the Mini approach. Upgrade on the inside and under the skin, carefully refine the "new design language" on the outside. Jay Mays and Freeman Thomas deserve better. I still own a 2000 TT coupe, it's more of a head turner than the 2nd gen, and probably the 3rd gen too.
      Luke
      • 9 Months Ago
      The original TT showed design flair and risk taking. I owned one and loved it (NO buttons on the steering wheel!). This seems to be "take the last version and make it more modern." Uninspired. The TT should be the one car in the Audi lineup that takes risks. It will never be the best performer in it's class, and that's fine, but it should be the most unique and original car in it's class. This is not that.
      holysmoke.s
      • 9 Months Ago
      I'd rather have an Accord Coupe, V6, with sweet 6-speed manual.
      Bernard
      • 9 Months Ago
      Now that they have the A5 and S5 this car is kind of redundant. Either way, the only actual sports car Audi has is the R8. The rest of them are too front heavy.
      Adrian Elliot
      • 9 Months Ago
      Good god that is exquisite.
      cpmanx
      • 9 Months Ago
      That headline? Really? The joke was predictable (and infantile) 15 years ago the first time I heard it.
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