Fiat Chrysler Automobiles aired three commercials during this year's Super Bowl, and the first spot was given to Maserarti during the first quarter of the big game. The 90-second ad was used by Maserati to introduce its new midsize Ghibli luxury sports sedan to a very captive American audience.

Called Strike, the Ghibli commercial tells the familiar tale of the little guy who waits around for the world's giants to let down their guard. Scroll down to watch the spot yourself and let us know if it lives up to the high bar that Chrysler brands have set for themselves in past Super Bowls.
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Maserati Debuts the All-new Ghibli in Super Bowl XLVIII
February 2, 2014 , Englewood Cliffs, NJ - Maserati, one of the world's most respected luxury automotive brands, continues to celebrate the North American roll out of the all-new Ghibli with a 90-second broadcast spot titled "Strike" during the first quarter of America's most anticipated football game.

"Maserati is embarking on its 100th year of craftsmanship with an important entry into the North American market," said Harald Wester, CEO of Maserati SpA. "We've worked hard at designing and engineering the Ghibli and there is no better time to make an impactful introduction than while the entire country is watching."

Maserati enters this new era backed by strong product and with ambitious sales goals driven by proven growth in the North American market, where the brand experienced triple digit gains in the past year.

First unveiled to the U.S. in November at the Los Angeles Auto Show, the Ghibli is Maserati's first-ever mid-size four-door luxury sports sedan vehicle. Available with all-wheel-drive and starting at $66,900, the Ghibli is powered by a Ferrari built twin-turbo V6 engine capable of over four hundred horsepower. Advanced suspension, Brembo brakes and extensive use of aluminum ensure comfort, with an ease of performance ready when called upon. Within its striking aerodynamic silhouette, the cabin offers rich Italian leathers, woods and other high quality materials that are at the heart of the Maserati brand. The Ghibli upholds the tradition, luxury and performance that have marked the brand for a century at a more accessible price point and open the brand up to new buyers.

"We know luxury sports sedan buyers are met with a lot of options these days, but in this category, cars have become more and more uniform," said Wester. "The Ghibli is the newest and most distinguished option in an all-too indistinguishable luxury sports sedan market."

Maserati strikes with Super Bowl spot
The story of Maserati's introduction to the North American market with the Ghibli is one of hard work, dedication, and an element of surprise. Maserati brings this story of passion and tenacity to life in its Super Bowl spot "Strike" featuring Academy Award-nominated actress Quvenzhane Wallis.

Directed by American filmmaker David Gordon Green and filmed on location in Los Angeles, "Strike" is a poetic nod to a brand with proven tradition and one of the highest standards of quality in the industry, who has been hard at work engineering an automobile that will usher it into the next 100 years of innovation-an automobile with power and personality capable of striking against the status quo. The spot is relevant to Americans everywhere who have had struggles and obstacles to overcome. It is a reminder that with steadfast commitment to hard work and unwavering passion, we can deal with our own "giants" around us, we can overcome them and achieve what we set out to do.

The broadcast spot was created in partnership with independent advertising agency, Wieden+Kennedy (W+K), based out of Portland, Ore. The campaign also includes several print and digital extensions, including a USA Today Cover Wrap and Yahoo Homepage Takeover, also created in partnership with W+K.

Maserati invites you to view their first ever TV broadcast feature – Strike, by visiting www.maserati.us or YouTube at http://bit.ly/Mo3CsV.

"Strike"
The world is full of giants.
They have always been here, lumbering in the schoolyards, limping through the alleys.
We had to learn how to deal with them, how to overcome them.
We were small but fast, remember?
We were like a wind appearing out of nowhere.
We knew that being clever was more important than being the biggest kid in the neighborhood.
As long as we keep our heads down, as long as we work hard,
trust what we feel in our guts, our hearts,
Then we're ready.
We wait until they get sleepy,
wait until they get so big they can barely move,
and then walk out of the shadows,
quietly walk out of the dark-and strike.


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  • 82 Comments
      Maser1
      • 10 Months Ago
      Looks like the ad has had an effect according to a LA Times article today....... "By brand, searches for Maserati went up 700% on kbb.com after the Italian automaker’s ad “Strike” aired in the first quarter of the game. By model, searches for the Ghibli that starred in that ad went up 4,250%, according to kbb.com." "The Maserati Ghibli was second on Edmund’s model rankings, with a 455% increase in traffic, while brand interest rose 299%." Looks like it worked....way to go Maserati!
      jtdaven115
      • 10 Months Ago
      They might have wanted to have a voice over say "Ghibli" by Maserati or something. So people actually know how to pronounce the name.
        Terry Actill
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jtdaven115
        . Mass-urr-arti Gib-lee
          Carlo Sirna
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Terry Actill
          A good advice is to use "google translate" which embeds the "text-to-speech" function for any language: Just follow this link and press the "Ascolta" (listen) button: http://translate.google.it/#en/it/ghibli
        rstonnerdd
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jtdaven115
        Is the name a reference to some location or geographic landmark? It almost looks like they reached into a hat and pulled some letters and then handed it to the marketing team "You guys are smart - make us a name.".
          Terry Actill
          • 10 Months Ago
          @rstonnerdd
          I believe it's a wind: "a hot dust-bearing wind of the North African desert."
          Carlo Sirna
          • 10 Months Ago
          @rstonnerdd
          Yes, it is a wind. The same applies to Scirocco and Bora (which have been used too to name cars). Source: I am italian.
        NG22
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jtdaven115
        Interesting point.
      ffelix422
      • 10 Months Ago
      To much little girl mumbling- not enough engine revving. This commercial would not get me in a Maserati dealership. ...those crazy Italians. lol
      NY EVO X MR GUY
      • 10 Months Ago
      This car is surprisingly expensive fully loaded. Might as well go quartoporte.
        kadajawi
        • 10 Months Ago
        @NY EVO X MR GUY
        Which car isn't? I can have Seat Leon for 13.126,35 Euro. Full loaded it is 31.795,49 Euro. 2.42x as much as the base spec car.
      kipswork
      • 10 Months Ago
      First! I'm not a fan of this ad. Cars don't "strike", they roll around. And they can't really be bullied. The whole thing is a badly tortured metaphor. Too much art department, not enough pictures of the freakin' car.
        Tourian
        • 10 Months Ago
        @kipswork
        I agree but the designers and engineers and production workers who build it do feel like they are striking back. They pour their heart and soul in to these machines, their creations and thus have more invested in them then the person who buys one. But even still you have "Porsche" guys and "Corvette guys. Ford and Chevy, Evo and STi. It shouldn't be too hard to buy in to the metaphor.
          adam1keith1980
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Tourian
          If you have to put a lot of effort to explain an ad, the ad is not effective.
      WindsWilling
      • 10 Months Ago
      All the car ads sucked. This one was one of the worst by far though. What a spectacular waste of advertising money on maserati's part. People from their advertising/marketing offices will be fired today.
      NG22
      • 10 Months Ago
      Some people may not have understood the context of the ad--that Maserati is attempting battle against the relatively boring, conservative luxury German companies. However, I don't think that takes away from the ad, which was epic, poignant, and featured an Oscar-nominated actress. More than anything, it was a really upscale commercial which was long and whose storyline didn't resemble any others. Plus, it was a surprise, which was exciting. In my experience, no one knew what the ad was for, but it was so intriguing, that everyone leaned in and stopped talking. Afterward, upon seeing the Ghibli, everyone told me how much they wanted one. Isn't that what an ad is supposed to be? An opportunity to create exposure and develop interest? What all of you who don't like the ad, or were too daft to follow it aren't mentioning is that Maserati Ghibli became a Google search word last night. People looked the car up and saw it wasn't an expensive Maserati. I know they're going to get some new clients from this--particularly the S Q4, which I'm sure will become popular in Atlanta, since they just experienced a "snow storm." And of course this thing will become more visible than the Panamera here in New York. I don't care if you hate the ad so long as you love the car. It has never looked so stunning.
      Doug
      • 10 Months Ago
      I thought it was among the best ads of the night. In contrast, i thought Ford's ad was among the worst and most offensive to the intelligence car ads ever made.
        Rochester
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Doug
        Best ad of the night was the Coke commercial singing America the Beautiful in multiple languages. So absolutely beautiful, and exactly what America is all about.
          Car Guy
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          The wife and I thought that was the WORST ad. This country used to be the great melting pot where all people could come and live the American dream and learn ENGLISH.....
          Greg
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          The Coke ad was PC pandering.
          rjstanford
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          Integration is a two-way street. When you add an ingredient into a melting pot, if the pre-existing contents of the pot aren't different afterwards then you've screwed something up.
          Rochester
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          Car Guy, that makes no sense at all. While off-topic a little bit, I thought I'd share what was a really touching moment. Had no idea it would bring out the anti-American trolls.
          Terry Actill
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          Nine teaspoonfuls of sugar in every can. Tooth rotting muck.
          axiomatik
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Rochester
          @Car Guy First generation immigrants very rarely speak the language of their new country, unless they immigrate as kids. For adults who move to a new country with a new language, they usually never get comfortable enough speaking the new language to use it regularly. They can generally understand decently, but are embarrassed by speaking. This has always been the case. Recent immigrants are no exception. You simply weren't around in 1900 when Italians were flooding into the country.
      Bernard
      • 10 Months Ago
      So the wimpy kid who gets bullied at school studies hard and grows up to own a Maserati? Are you sure? Because most people with 6 figure cars in their driveway were born into that wealth already...
        Jon
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Bernard
        It's not a 6 figure car.
        Car Guy
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Bernard
        You do realize the majority of millionaires in the US are self made, right? So much for your class warfare nonsense.......
        F150Soul
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Bernard
        You sir are the true definition of a turd...
      tbird57w
      • 10 Months Ago
      waste of money
      mycommentemail
      • 10 Months Ago
      Sentimental clap trap. Beautifully filmed no doubt. Better than the Chrysler commercial by far. But wtf? Videos of a bunch of working class people working hard being used to sell a car only bankers can afford? Oh hey, look at this welder and this dancer. Aren't they noble? Aren't they putting in a solid day's work? Aren't they proud? Yeah. That's so cool. They are such noble under dogs. Just like a $70K Italian luxury sedan. (Ugh! Now go away you working peasants. What do you want? We coopted your "noble" image to sell or obscenely expensive luxury item and now are done. We don't need you anymore.)
      citidriver
      • 10 Months Ago
      This ad makes me want the car less.
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