Even before Mazda unveiled the 2014 Mazda6, it had introduced its innovative, non-hybrid i-Eloop (Intelligent Energy Loop) brake regeneration system. This technology converts kinetic energy into usable electricity using the alternator, a DC/DC converter and a capacitor mounted just behind the front fascia. During deceleration, the alternator captures energy that is then stored in the capacitor, which can later be used to directly power electric devices like climate control and audio systems. When i-Eloop power is used, it reduces the load on the engine and helps to conserve fuel.

Now available on the Mazda6, i-Eloop is only available on the $29,695 Grand Touring trim level as a part of the $2,080 GT Technology Package, meaning that buyers desiring i-Eloop will have to spend at least $31,775 (not including destination). The added price of this technology should be worth it for those looking for optimal fuel economy as the i-Eloop, combined with the package's active grille shutters, will bump the sedan's fuel economy numbers up to 28 miles per gallon city and 40 mpg highway – both are improvements of 2 mpg over the standard Mazda6 Grand Touring. The GT Technology Package also includes a Sport mode, lane departure warning, high beam control, radar cruise control and forward obstruction warning – the latter two technologies are currently offered in a $900 package that is being discontinued.

i-Eloop will eventually be offered on other Mazda products including the 2014 Mazda3. Scroll down for the official press release on the Mazda6's fuel-saving i-Eloop technology.
Show full PR text
MAZDA ANNOUNCES PRICING, FUEL ECONOMY OF i-ELOOP-EQUIPPED 2014 MAZDA6
-Midsize Sedan is First Mazda to Feature Capacitor-Based Brake Energy Regeneration System-

Jul 5, 2013

IRVINE, Calif., July 5, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) has announced updated pricing of its all-new 2014 Mazda6 midsize sedan, now featuring the ground-breaking regenerative engine braking system known as i-ELOOP. When coupled with SKYACTIV®[1] TECHNOLOGY, the brand's fuel-efficient and performance-oriented engineering philosophy, the Mazda6 will achieve best-in-class fuel economy amongst competing gasoline-powered vehicles with an EPA-rated 28 city/40 highway/32 combined mpg. When not i-ELOOP-equipped, the 2014 Mazda6 still achieves class-leading highway fuel economy at 38 mpg.

"Mazda is again changing the game of automotive engineering, this time making fuel efficiency not seem as a compromise but a true complementary feature as part of the complete vehicle package," said Jim O'Sullivan, president and CEO, MNAO. "With the addition of i-ELOOP, the 2014 Mazda6 will achieve the best mileage for a non-hybrid midsize sedan. But fuel economy isn't the sole focus of our engineering and design teams, as being a leader in dynamics, design and safety create a win-win for the company and consumers."

With its name derived from "Intelligent Energy Loop," i-ELOOP is a capacitor-based regenerative engine braking system that converts a vehicle's kinetic energy into electricity as the car decelerates. The electricity captured is then stored for later use to power all the vehicle's electrical components, such as headlights, climate control and audio systems. This reduces the need for the engine to burn extra fuel in order to generate electricity and, therefore, improves fuel economy without sacrificing driving performance. In order to efficiently recapture the kinetic energy and convert it into electricity, i-ELOOP utilizes a 12- to 25-volt variable voltage alternator, a DC/DC converter and a low-resistance, high-capacity electric double layer capacitor (EDLC).

Conventional alternators are constantly charging the battery in an effort to keep up with a vehicle's electrical loads, which means using engine power to operate the alternator, which, in turn, consumes fuel. With the i-ELOOP system in operation, the alternator is free-wheeling, creating almost no parasitic drag on the engine, which reduces the amount of fuel used. Upon vehicle deceleration, the engine and alternator continue to spin as the vehicle slows down, working off of the vehicle's inertia. To take advantage of this free energy, i-ELOOP's special variable-voltage alternator kicks in and generates short bursts of electricity that is stored within the capacitor. The capacitor then meters power out into a smooth, continuous flow to satisfy energy loads.

While the increased engine braking caused by the hard-charging alternator is too small for drivers to feel, the smooth power delivery coming from the capacitor means the electrical systems do not operate differently with i-ELOOP. Exact fuel savings will vary based on electrical load and individual driving habits.

On sale now, the 2014 Mazda6 starts at $20,990[2] MSRP and is available in three trim levels – Sport, Touring and Grand Touring. Featuring a SKYACTIV-G 2.5-liter gasoline engine as standard equipment, Mazda6 vehicles offer 184 horsepower at 5,700 rpm and 185 lb-ft of torque at 3,250 rpm. Sport ($22,695 MSRP) and Touring ($23,645 MSRP) models are available with either a SKYACTIV-MT six-speed manual transmission or SKYACTIV-Drive six-speed automatic transmission. Fuel efficiency when paired with the manual transmission for non-i-ELOOP cars is rated by the EPA at 25 city/37 highway/29 combined mpg and increases to 26 city/38 highway/30 combined mpg with the automatic.

A mid-year add-on, the SKYACTIV-MT six-speed manual transmission is now available on the Touring trim. The SKYACTIV-Drive automatic transmission adds $1,050 to $24,695 MSRP, but equipment and features remain the same for all Touring models, including offering new vehicle features such as a Commander Switch for the 5.8-inch display screen and Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA). The all-new Smart City Brake Support (SCBS) system will continue to be available as part of the Touring Technology Package ($2,000 MSRP).

Available on Grand Touring models ($29,695 MSRP), i-ELOOP will be part of the new GT Technology Package ($2,080 MSRP) which features additional vehicle equipment such as a Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS), High Beam Control (HBC), Mazda Radar Cruise Control (MRCC) and Forward Obstruction Warning (FOW), a Sport mode button and active grille shutters. The stand-alone MRCC/FOW Package, which includes Mazda Radar Cruise Control (MRCC) and Forward Obstruction Warning (FOW), is still available for Grand Touring models but will be phased out in the coming months.

Earning a Top Safety Pick+ rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), standard safety features for all 2014 Mazda6 models include six airbags (front, side and full side-curtain), whiplash-reducing front headrests, power-assisted ventilated front and solid rear disc brakes, anti-lock brakes (ABS) with Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD) and Brake Assist, daytime running lights, Dynamic Stability Control (DSC), a Traction Control System (TCS), hill launch assist, a fold-away brake pedal assembly, a trunk entrapment release system, a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS), three-point safety belts for all seating positions, front seatbelt pretensioners with force limiters as well as Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH).

Touring models feature a Blind Spot Monitoring (BSM) system and Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA) as standard equipment with the Smart City Brake Support (SCBS) system available as part of an optional package. Grand Touring models feature BSM, RCTA, SCBS and an Adaptive Front-lighting System (AFS) as standard equipment. Forward Obstruction Warning (FOW), Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS) and High Beam Control (HBC) are available as part of an optional package.

For more information on fuel economy and how estimates are determined, visit www.fueleconomy.gov, a joint website venture between the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Mazda North American Operations is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., and oversees the sales, marketing, parts and customer service support of Mazda vehicles in the United States and Mexico through nearly 700 dealers. Operations in Mexico are managed by Mazda Motor de Mexico in Mexico City.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 68 Comments
      Cubanaso
      • 2 Years Ago
      We have a **"2014" Mazda 6 and we love it. I just took a road trip to VA and at 75mph it was avg about 36.7-37mpg which was very impressive. So, I can assure you that driven normally crusing on the highway you will hit the EPA numbers for highway. They dont test at 75mph so 38mpg is easy. I like the tech but I agree that it should be a stand alone option...this is a misstep by Mazda. Last thing...now get to the Mazdaspeed 6 please!!!
      ffforte
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's likely that i-Eloop would trickle down to lessor models and eventually be standard equipment as production costs come down- provided the expense is still worth the MPG increase compared to other efficiency technologies.
        Gavin Varitech
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ffforte
        Yep, it will. Capacitors are not expensive and neither is anything else that is part of the system (most of the system is part of the car already). I believe it will be standard on all Mazda's before long.
        Daniel D
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ffforte
        Standard on every Mazda 6 sold in Australia now, irrespective of trim level. I think the cheap gas prices in the NA market delayed its introduction, but over time it will be on every model.
          6thGear
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Daniel D
          It is standard on Mazda6s sold in Europe too.
      x percent
      • 2 Years Ago
      I can't recall reading a review of a hybrid that didn't criticize the brakes for being grabby and non-linear. On paper this looks very good but if it messes with the drive-ability I'll spend the extra $150 a year on fuel.
      GTR
      • 2 Years Ago
      pretty cool tech, stupid name though. Any name that starts with "i-" is a dead trend with no thought put into it. Should have just called it ELOOP.
      ctsmith1066
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's still just 28 mpg city.
        aviboy97
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ctsmith1066
        28mpg city in a non-hybrid mid-sized gas engine vehicle. Who gets better??
        k.naz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ctsmith1066
        Why are you even complaining about 28 in the city...?
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ctsmith1066
        If this gets a TRUE 28 mpg in real city driving, then I think that is amazing! Most small cars don't even get that. Add in start/stop and Mazda would have a killer 30city/40highway midsize car. That would be seriously impressive that Mazda can do it yet all these multi-billion dollar companies don't have something that does the same (GM, Ford, Honda, Toyota, Hyundai, Dodge etc etc). The luxury car companies have a bit of an excuse because of their features and extra sound deadening etc. But why is it that Mazda can make a better product than all these others with much less money in their pockets for R&D!???
      Jamie Elmhirst
      • 2 Years Ago
      Impressive. Imagine what fuel economy the new Mazda3 will achieve with the same package.
      ALafya
      • 2 Years Ago
      Shame it's only with the most expensive trim. Should be an independent option on all trims.
      normc32
      • 2 Years Ago
      So it's within spitting distance of a heavier Malibu Eco on 18's? Pffft!
        aviboy97
        • 2 Years Ago
        @normc32
        The Malibu Eco has an electric motor, the Mazda6 does not. The Mazda6 with i-eloop is 4mpg better on the highway, 2 better in the city and 3 better on average.
          aviboy97
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aviboy97
          normc32- The Malibu Eco has a 15kW electric motor, large lithium ion battery back and regenerative braking system and still falls short of the Mazda6 in terms of fuel-efficiency and power and the Mazda6 has no electric motor or lithium ion battery pack. This is why what GM offers is inferior, even though it has a hybrid set up. The EPA considers the Malibu a Hybrid
          normc32
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aviboy97
          Eloop should get better mpg as mentioned above by current '6 owners. This is some stop gate that falls short. The eAssist is not a hybrid as the engine never propels the car. It also moves a heavier LaCrosse to similar hwy mpg. Unlike Mazada's temporary propulsion that poops out when emptied over long highway durations the eAssist keeps giving assist. Which makes it better than a hybrid like the ES300 hybrid that excels in the city/urban but falls short on the highway. The eAssist will less expensive to replace as electric motor can be had used for a couple hundred bucks and the battery is not $1,000's like a hybrid. Some of the college university students are using the motors on purpose built motorcycles.
          normc32
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aviboy97
          And it'll probably weigh 500 lbs less and be a smaller car. Well that's crap. The eAssist LaCrosse and Malibu can bust out low 40's at highway cruise...forever. Or until you pull off the highway. Will hwy mpg only last until the energy is depleted?
      Schwy
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am sure if I do my math wrong someone will let me know. But at $3.60 per gallon @ 15000 miles per year. The bump of 2 mpg will save on average $100 per year. So wouldn't this "package" take 20 years to pay off? They really should offer this as a standalone option in all trims or at least offer some kind of package on all trims.
        finzenchrome
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Schwy
        That's marketing at work. As with any new technology, it is initially offered in the highest trims only and then trickle on down in subsequent years to keep the interest in the car going for buyers. Remember power windows, remote fobs, airbags, and now push-button start? Same deal.
        ap
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Schwy
        Yes, but on your 21st. year you're already making money :)
        Jamie Elmhirst
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Schwy
        Not a fair costing. i-E-LOOP is offered as a part of the Technology Package that also offers all of the advanced radar-based safety features as well. It's probably a $500 item on its own.
          Schwy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jamie Elmhirst
          But doesn't that mean the only people paying for this are the people who don't care about saving money. Especially gas? They are effectively making it a luxury item by only having it on the top trim with all the options selected. I think it would make more sense to increase the base price of the car a little and just have it as a standard. It really is just a gloating mark at this point for advertisement. UP TO 40MPG!* *Most expensive trim with super tech package.
          Schwy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jamie Elmhirst
          Greg, that is exactly what I am saying. To me it sounds like every car commercial. (and many other products) "Buy this and save!" You are not saving your spending. If you want to save money then you can't be checking every option on the highest trim. All those packaged option are not performance they are luxury items, except the i-Eloop feature of course. Which is why it should be a separate option on the lower trim. And as for your analogy. I should buy this option because it may one day in the next 4-5 years (64k Miles) save me money? lol. Or better yet, maybe I should spend this extra money so that the next guy that owns my car can save some money on gas.
        kipswork
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Schwy
        Because I'm geeky, I went ahead and worked it out. At $3.50 per gallon the mileage you need to drive to pay off the iEloop is a mere 328,075 miles. At 15k per year that's only 21.87 YEARS to break even on the system. That's assuming it works flawlessly for 21 years and never requires a nickel of maintenance. If you look at fuel economy with an overall cost approach like this, you start to see where the dirt cheap, dirt simple, no-frills vehicles make the most sense.
          6thGear
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kipswork
          That is assuming iEloop cost $2000. It doesn't... it is part of a package.
          Greg
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kipswork
          Remember, this is part of a package, so you need to subtract the benefit you get from all the other features that come with it. People buy technology even if it doesn't improve mileage, so there's a cost/reward consideration that must be done for those other features. How much are the directional lights worth to you over those miles driven? How much is the radar cruise worth to you over those miles driven? Etc.
      Mazdaspeed6
      • 2 Years Ago
      Automakers make the best cars when they are desperate. Without ford covering some of the development costs and the instability of the yen, Mazda has shown that they can stand on their own and deliver class leading products in performance, efficiency, and fit and finish
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        normc32
        • 2 Years Ago
        Forty mpg in a 3600 lbs car is nothing today. My Turbo Verano got 39.3 mpg on a full tank just driving to work. I've seen mid-40's on just highway cruise at 60 mph. Right now I have double your power and torque from just a 2.0T.
          aviboy97
          • 2 Years Ago
          @normc32
          Mid 40's in a Verano that is rated at 21 city and 30 highway? You have got to be joking. Stop trolling in this Mazda thread. Stop hating the Mazda because it gets well proven fuel efficiency. The data is there, from Consumer Reports to Fuelly.com. Everyone everywhere has gotten outstanding efficiency from the Mazda6 and things just got better.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @normc32
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
          bK
          • 2 Years Ago
          well maybe you'll get 45 combined mpg with it, i dunno...
        Greg
        • 2 Years Ago
        The SkyActiv engines run on the Miller cycle, not the Atkins.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Greg
          [blocked]
          6MT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Greg
          Atkins. lol
          Brian P
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Greg
          The Miller cycle is the Atkinson cycle with the addition of forced induction. Prius, Ford Fusion Hybrid, etc are non-supercharged and therefore it is the Atkinson cycle. The old Miller Cycle V6 had a supercharger. The Skyactiv-G engines are (thus far) naturally aspirated, and therefore it is, if anything, the Atkinson cycle. Doesn't matter what Mazda's spin doctors are trying to say, this is the industry convention terminology. To say that the Mazda Skyactiv engines are the only non-hybrids using the Atkinson cycle is, shall we say, a bit of another spin-doctor exaggeration. These engines have variable valve timing, as do many others these days. Heck, the upcoming GM direct-injection V6 and V8 engines in the pickup trucks (and the Corvette) have VVT using a single-cam pushrod arrangement. A good many of these engines retard the cam timing under part-load operation. Late intake valve closing (intentionally making the compression stroke less effective) and later-than-normal exhaust valve opening (much closer to BDC than normal) results in the effective compression stroke being shorter than the effective expansion stroke. Guess what ... that's the definition of the Atkinson cycle (without forced induction) or Miller cycle (if the engine has forced induction). So it's not accurate to say that the Sky-G is the first non-hybrid to use the Atkinson cycle. Lots of engines that have VVT do it.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Greg
          [blocked]
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Greg
          [blocked]
      Kuro Houou
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's pretty impressive, 40mpg hwy without a battery, if its actually true and not a fictional number from the government it will be just as good as the new Ford Fusion Hybrid which nets 40 mpg (even though they state 47). This is from two friends that have it and barely ever see over 40mpg. On average I could see the Mazda 6 getting about 34 mpg easily. I would take a 6 mpg difference to save about 5000 dollars over the equivalent hybrid cost of the Fusion (don't get me wrong I love that car too). In the that 5-6 mpg difference only saves you at the most 200 dollars of gas a year (normal 12000 miles driven in a year). Over 5 years that's only 1000 dollars. Can't wait to see what the Mazda 3 gets. I am guessing it will be 31/43 mpg. Which would be pretty amazing for a gas car imo.
    • Load More Comments
    Share This Photo X