1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle
  • 1967 Toyota 2000GT Solar Electric Vehicle

Q may have packed James Bond's cars with plenty of killer tech (get it?), but the 1967 Toyota 2000GT you see above has got it's own bad boy secrets. Well, if bad boys like zero-emission electric vehicles.

Weighing just 1,460 kilograms (3,218 pounds), this modified 2000GT is all-electric under the skin – and on the skin in some areas. A high-performance solar panel embedded into the hood and a transmission solar panel sits in place of the rear glass. These feed energy into to a 345-volt, 40-kWh lithium-ion battery which, in turn, powers a 120-kW electric motor. Together in the stylish 2000GT, this powertrain is good for a top speed of over 200 kilometers an hour (124 miles per hour).

The car is on display at the Detroit Auto Show this week, but we fist caught wind of it a year ago when a video popped up showing the work of Japan's Crazy Car Project. Since then, some powertrain components have been upgraded (it used to have a 35-kWh battery). You can see the original video of the car in action here.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 39 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      Please Sebastian when you write a story about an electric car include what type of batteries are in it. It's the most interesting thing about electric cars. Saying it has lithium ion batteries in it is a bit like saying a gas car has an engine in it. ....Yes I know it has an engine, but I'm interested in the type. I can go off and find out of course. It's just I shouldn't have to with every story. It says "Panasonic" on the hood so I guess I will have to start my investigation there. Just a friendly moan. Hope you don't mind. :-)
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      LOL. That is a cool bit of history. I'm a fan of solar and a fan of EVs but anyone that knows about both of these will tell you that the amount of energy you can collect from the surface area of a car is just not going to amount to much and it generally isn't worth doing because often the panels won't be oriented well or the car will be in a garage, under tree, etc. That said, every little bit helps. I think EVs should have some solar if for no other reason than to prevent the car from becoming 'bricked' by running down the battery too far by accident.
        Ryan
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Spec
        I have done the math, and it is better to have the panels on the house when you can. Unless you are going to go on a cross-country camping trip and you don't have a house... I was looking at how to mount nine 210 W panels that could slide out when parked. But, even at 250W per mile, you are looking at getting maybe 32-40 miles worth of energy a day (can vary widely, in Ohio on a semi cloudy day today I generated 8 miles) You would need something like 60-80 of them to power a pickup truck down the road at highways speeds on a sunny day. I really would like to see how the solar car competition would do if they scaled things up just a bit.
      Catherine
      • 2 Years Ago
      If you think Mark`s story is shocking..., last munth my sisters friend who is a single mom basically brought in $8550 sitting there from there house and their friend's ex-wife`s neighbour has been doing this for 3 months and made more than $8550 in there spare time on line. apply the tips on this page...Great60.com
      carguy1701
      • 2 Years Ago
      No thanks.
      Actionable Mango
      • 2 Years Ago
      Keep in mind they found one that was mechanically undriveable, cosmetically destroyed, and uselessly stored away. Now it once again drives in the light of day and people can appreciate it.
        James Barrios
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        Yes, I understand what your saying, but I don't think a car like this is what you choose. They only made a little over 300 cars in a three year period so this is a very rare car! I'm sure there are plenty of people who would have spent the time and money to restore this to its original beauty! You want to make an electric car, use a Corolla! There are millions of them around.
      JC
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here's a test drive of it. It sounds pretty cool. I know a lot of people think it's sacrilege to use a 2000GT but would the car be getting nearly the same amount of attention if it were a Corolla? http://blog.toyota.co.uk/we-drive-the-toyota-2000gt-solar-electric-vehicle
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wonder how long it takes the panels to recharge the battery.
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's so sad. A classic like that and now it's just being used as a shell.
      Dean
      • 2 Years Ago
      There is a special place in hell for those who ruin incredible cars. The creator of this car has more than guaranteed his spot. Nothing can redeem him.
        Dean
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Dean
        I hope ShutoSteve's comment below is correct. I'd hate to know that a great car was ruined.
        Marcopolo
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Dean
        @ Dean Interesting response to your comments. Your erroneous comment received at least 3 votes, while your gracious corrections attracted down votes. It seems some people love being indignant ! (no matter how wrong).
      Jeff Zekas
      • 3 Months Ago
      Rather than ruining a rare car, the builders should have made a fibreglass replica of the Toyota 2000GT: same visual impact, but lighter, purpose built, more efficient, and more respectful of the history and uniqueness of this classic vehicle.
      BipDBo
      • 3 Months Ago
      No, no I wouldn't.
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      Oh, you'd be lucky to get 1kWh a day from a panel that size. So a month, maybe two.
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