Automotive News reports General Motors may redesign the battery pack found in the Chevrolet Volt in response to an investigation by federal authorities. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration discovered that in certain crash situations in which the Volt suffered a side impact, the battery pack could catch fire after sitting for several days. In response, GM has offered around 5,500 Volt customers a loaner vehicle until a solution to the issue can be determined. Now, CEO Dan Akerson has said that the battery pack may receive a redesign.

In addition, GM won't sell the Volt's European corporate cousin, the Opel Ampera, until the issue can be resolved. Akerson reiterated that the Volt is a safe car, pointing to the vehicle's excellent crash test ratings. Those buyers who have brought the Volt home have been plenty satisfied with the vehicle as well, with Consumer Reports reporting 93 percent of Volt owners would purchase the vehicle again.


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  • 71 Comments
      ojfltx
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is not helping GM. It is starting to give the impression there is something wrong with the Volt. Bad marketing.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ojfltx
        [blocked]
        hevace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ojfltx
        That's what faulty engineering needs, better marketing.
        hevace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ojfltx
        That's what they need. Better marketing. Maybe they can pay for it with taxpayer money. Or maybe they can fire more engineers.
        Famsert
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ojfltx
        Really, the media forced them to announce they're going to redesign the battery after the NHTSA begins an investigation? LOL
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Famsert
          [blocked]
      Lemon
      • 3 Years Ago
      Reading the comment section makes me lose faith in humanity.
      Robert Ryan
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope there is no unintended acceleration with the Volt. LOL It sounds like GM has found its loose floor mat. as well At least they are going to redesign the batteries to try and fix the issue.
      ammca66564
      • 3 Years Ago
      They're getting so far out ahead of this issue, I fear they're killing themselves in the public mind.
      Bill Burke
      • 3 Years Ago
      What a dog ! Poor GM, forced by the obama administration to build this thing, it is a failure by any measure. Except for sales to government agencies and to a few hundred clueless tree huggers, this thing is a big money loser and an example of the failure of our federal leaders to understand people and the free market. Redesign these losers instead and let this thing die ASAP..
        XJ Yamaha
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Your comment proves your an ignorant know-nothing.
        Lachmund
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        god...never thought those stupid tea party supporters were REAL!!!
        A_Guy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        "On October ******2006****** the E-flex platform was selected for the new propulsion architecture and the name Volt was chosen by General Motors." Obama took office in 09. Math is hard.
        IBx27
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        You're about as stupid as an obama voting sheep if you disregard the fact that the Volt debuted as a concept in two-thousand mother flipping six.
      redgpgtp97
      • 3 Years Ago
      I recently saw a Volt at a local dealership and I noticed the hatch or trunk was open so I went over to check it out. The mechanic said that it wouldn't start and I laughed and looked in the trunk and saw a lott of plastic parts. I didn't know what these parts went to, but I thought that looks cheaply made.
      Zoom
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hm, 27 years in development (or what seems like it) and they didn't anticipate this happening after a minor crash.
        DrEvil
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        None of the crash performed by the NHTSA are minor crashes.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        [blocked]
          DB
          • 3 Years Ago
          yomama: According to NHTSA, GM's didn't even have battery draining procedures until GM was made aware of the fire. The following is from the the Detroit News: 'He defended the agency's response and handling of the crash, rejecting suggestions that NHTSA bore some of the blame for the fire. Strickland said that General Motors Co. didn't have procedures to deal with depowering a battery in an electric vehicle after a crash — nor did anyone else. The fire at a government testing facility in Wisconsin sparked a blaze of several nearby vehicles. "There was no protocol by GM or anybody else in terms of what you do with a post-crash hull, with regards to the battery, " Strickland said. "It didn't exist."' http://detnews.com/article/20111116/AUTO01/111160408/New-standards-to-increase-fuel-efficiency-requirements-to-54.5-mpg-by-2025#ixzz1e04v8Auu
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Sukairain
      • 3 Years Ago
      *Knock Knock* "What's that sound?" That's the sound of nails being hammered into your coffin. Good night and good bye naughty faulty Volt.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      hevace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hmm . . . another half-assed engineering job by GM. They need more taxpayer money, stat!
        Lemon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hevace
        The Volt passes all FMVSS tests without intrusion to the battery compartment. The few that caught fire did so because they were left sitting with a charged battery for an extended period of time after an accident. Even the NHTSA, who conducted the tests, said that Volt owners have no reason to be concerned. Unless you plan on getting in a wreck and then sitting in your car for several days afterwards.....
          DB
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Lemon
          Lemon: If you read NHTSA's statement, the battery was physically damaged in each of the tests in question. In a gasoline vehicle, if there is leakage of fuel from the tank then the test the vehicle doesn't pass. In the two of the three most recent tests, the "thermal events" happened almost immendiately. BTW, The tests are not called FMVSS tests. They are call NCAP (New Car Assessment Program) tests.
      Smilingoat
      • 3 Years Ago
      a lot of old news made into modern headlines. drain the batteries after a big crash. we learned this with EV's 15 years ago.
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