Chrysler 300 Long-Wheelbase - Click above for high-res image gallery

Chrysler won't be stretching the company's new 300 for livery service anytime soon. According to Automotive News, the automaker isn't interested in locking horns with Lincoln in the limousine business. The reason? Chrysler built a long-wheelbase 300 once before and the vehicle didn't exactly leap off of lots and into chauffeur fleets. Part of the lackluster demand came from the fact that the old 300 had to be shipped to a separate company for livery modification, making it more expensive in the process. Chrysler says that since there isn't an overwhelming demand for the elongated 300, there isn't much of a business case for its creation.

That pretty much leaves Lincoln to take the livery market by default despite the fact that the long-reigning Town Car is on its way to the grave. The company has said that it plans to use the MKT crossover to replace the old Panther platform cars, though it remains to be seen if livery customers will embrace the notion of adopting the baleen-faced high rider.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 30 Comments
      datroll06
      • 3 Years Ago
      A lot of livery companys are going to the Ford Flex to replace the Grand Marquis. With no more town Cars, it's the right time to make an inhouse long wheelbase 300.
      SilentRunning
      • 3 Years Ago
      I stand by my claim that Ford is making a monumental mistake retiring the always reliable Panther car.s My business will suffer when I can no longer find good low mileage Marquis and Town Cars to buy. The engines are ultra reliable and capable of withstanding the ugliest abuse a car can take. Non stop around the clock operations running to and fro the airports and back to the suburbs. The cars rack up wild mileage in short order but the cars don't give up. The Lincoln replacement the MKT-L is overtly complex and downright ugly, and far to expensive to be a viable alternative to most companies. Simplicity is the key and the MKT is not it. Chrysler never had a stake in the livery market as the 300 had a hopelessly small trunk which is a big deal for a livery company. Meanwhile Cadillac makes a nice vehicle but the ones we have had in our fleet have never held up and are making frequent trips to the shops for increasingly costly repairs. RIP Panther Cars, the most reliable vehicles on the road period.
      Paul P.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Forget livery drivers, I want a long wheelbase 300! One the biggest complaints of the 300 series is that the rear seats are a bit difficult to get into, and rear seat room is a bit lacking. A slightly longer wheelbase would fix both those issues. A slightly longer wheelbase, the 5.7L hemi, an 8-spd tranmission, and AWD.....it would be my perfect car.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Paul P.
        [blocked]
          BG
          • 3 Years Ago
          That is a definition of bad engineering and design: extensive packaging for minimal capacity. A UPS van is just the opposite: major capacity with minimal packaging.
      From The Back Seat
      • 3 Years Ago
      GM should consider pushing into this market by bringing over the civilian version of the Caprice sedan (perhaps branded as a Holden for that extra bit of market separation). As a stretched version of the Commodore (G8) sedan, it would have lots of room in the rear as well as the requisite trunk space the Livery companies need. As well given that it would only be sold to the Livery companies in this format, it would be easily identifiable and offer up a bit of separation from the rest of the crowd in exclusive transport. The Powers That Be should consider this, if only to further spread the costs of importing the Caprice over a larger market base (Holden would also enjoy shipping more cars here, as they were all prepped to send loads of G8's over before Pontiac got canned).
        From The Back Seat
        • 3 Years Ago
        @From The Back Seat
        Sorry for the double post - the comment form didn't seem to log my first post, so I redid it. Yay internet!
      From The Back Seat
      • 3 Years Ago
      This would be a great opportunity for GM to expand (and thus partially subsidize) it's imports of the Caprice sedan in North America. Currently only slated to serve as police cruisers, the Caprice in its typical civilian form would make for an excellent livery car. As it would be sold only to livery fleets and police departments it would be easily identifiable (further distinction could be to brand it as a Holden, giving it an even more distinct status). The PTB at GM would be crazy not to at least try and break into this market with this car, if only to further sales of the Caprice in this market and thus lower costs of shipping cars over from Australia.
      jjdaddyo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Chrysler is making a mistake and Hyundai needs to bust a move and get in there with a long-wheelbase Genesis. I'm sure they have one already, since these are popular in Asia. Nobody wants an MKT, which has to be one of the ugliest cars sold in the US.
        OfDukes
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jjdaddyo
        ^ Typical Hyundai fan boy, that is all.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @OfDukes
          [blocked]
          brian
          • 3 Years Ago
          @OfDukes
          You can call names all you want, but JJ has a valid point. Hyundai has a modern RWD, factory LWB 5.0 V8 3-box sedan with a 10 year warranty and all the amenities that a business traveler could ever want priced just a few thousand more than the antiquated Town Car. To me, it's a no brainer: Lincoln has effectively abandoned the traditional livery market, Chrysler has an opportunity to reenter it by creating a factory LWB sedan but has chosen not to take advantage of the vacuum Lincoln is leaving... ...whereas Hyundai has the perfect product and opportunity to take advantage of this lucrative market.
          brian
          • 3 Years Ago
          @OfDukes
          Sea Urchin - Taxis and Limos, while having similar purposes, are different animals. While it's perfectly acceptable to paint any old Malibu, Prius or Fusion yellow and call it a Taxi - Livery/Black Cars are a different species. Black Cars are generally rented by the hour rather than the trip, have suited drivers, and are for people who might never consider taking a taxi - and therefore need to be based on a larger "Premium" model to justify the client spending $80 for what would normally be a $40 cab ride... ...and currently "Premium" in the US primiarily means a LWB, RWD V8.
        Basil Exposition
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jjdaddyo
        I agree with you but Hyundai's entry should be the Equus - that back seat is MADE for livery!
        reattadudes
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jjdaddyo
        one thing you need to keep in mind is durability. many livery cars are on the road 24 hours a day, and lots of brands aren't up to the job. I was in the livery business for ten years, and in that time saw my fill of BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, Jaguar, and even Rolls Royces pressed into livery service. not one single make could hold up to the severe service, and they were constantly broken down on the side of the road with paying passengers inside. the Cadillacs and Lincolns (we always had a fleet of white diamond deVilles) always held up without any real problems. when cars were ordered with factory livery packages (W20 for Cadillac, 605A for the Lincoln) they came with a 3 year/150,000 mile warranty at no additional charge IF they were registered to an eligible livery company. this warranty was not available to retail customers. I completely agree with you about the Equus, and absolutely love the car. it will either take Hyundai to consider making a livery model available, or someone to spend the 58K, and see how it works. the average livery car has about 350,000 miles on the odometer after two years.
      Blakkar
      • 3 Years Ago
      This would be a prime opportunity for CHRYSLER to revive the Imperial nameplate. NOT that Rolls-Royce knock-off. Really an All-or-nothing luxury touring cruiser. CHRYSLER, like FORD and GM, is suffering from an overt lack of confidence to just build it. They over-analyze and over scrutinize every penny, and ultimately think their way out of building cars EVERYONE knows they should be making.
      Ronald. What up?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sooooooo, basically Ford is abandoning ALL of the markets it has the greatest share in? Limousines (Town Cars)...Interceptor/Police Pkg. Vehicles (Crown Victoria/Grand Marquis)...and replacing them with Taurus-based vehicles (The MKT is just a Taurus, and so is the new faux "Interceptor")? Maaaaan, if Chrysler doesn't see the writing on the wall and get in where the gettings good! Don't be scared, grab the bull (or, in this case, "Taurus"...Lol!) by the horns...
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      I just ... can't imagine a limo service purchasing an MKTowncar while taking themselves seriously. Ok ok, I'll tell you: the interior appointments on the MKT are just wonderful and luxurious ... but as soon as you step out and realize you've been riding around in *THAT*, you'll want a bag to put over your face.
      Scr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sounds like an opportunity for the streched Hyundai Equus http://www.wisecarshopper.com/tag/equus/ They would probably get some buyers out of it, too, once people rode in it and wondered what it was.
      Bill Burke
      • 3 Years Ago
      I anticipate a larger vehicle from Chrysler, possibly called Imperial, based of the next generation LX platform. I believe this RWD platform will spawn everything from a performance Chrysler coupe, to a shared ultra luxury model with engines from Chrysler and Maserati and sold under both brands. Plans are underway to significantly modify and update this platform and to produce dozens of variants for Chrysler, Dodge, Alfa Romeo and Maserati, most powered by Chrysler engines and built in Chrysler plants in North America.
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