• Mar 24, 2011
A Larger Lancer For These Crossover-Obsessed Times

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC - Click above for high-res image gallery

Mitsubishi has a problem with its current lineup. Unless you're looking for a Lancer, your options are limited to the Galant mid-size sedan and the Endeavor and Outlander crossovers. Right now, the Galant is contemplating seppuku and the Endeavor hasn't been fully redesigned since it first went on sale back in 2003. The Outlander, however, has something positive to offer. It seats up to seven passengers (in a pinch), has been named an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Top Safety Pick, and tops out at 28 miles per gallon on the highway.

Mitsubishi knows having just two competitive vehicles to choose from isn't enough to compete in an industry eager to fill every niche, and the company appears focused on evolving the two lone bright spots in its lineup. The Lancer has spawned many variants, the latest being the Lancer Sportback, a fun-to-drive wagon that doesn't step on the toes of the top-trim Lancer Evolution. The Outlander, meanwhile, recently gave its name to the smaller 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport, a five-passenger crossover looking to make its mark in a currently crowded segment.

Continue reading Review: 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC...

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC

Photos copyright ©2011 Jeff Glucker / AOL

If the 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport had a favorite song, it would be Sister Sledge's "We Are Family." There's no mistaking this CUV for anything other than a product from the diamond-star family. The gaping mouth and muscular haunches leave no doubt that the Outlander Sport got the "good genes" after a night of passion between a Lancer Evo and the larger Outlander. And despite sharing the name "Outlander" with its larger three-row brother, the Outlander Sport is its own vehicle, a compact crossover different in size, shape and demeanor.

Up front, for instance, a jet-fighter nose kicks off an aggressive forward-leaning stance. Sharply cut headlights dig into the face of the Outlander Sport while the roof line pulls tightly rearward along the 169.1-inch long body. That length is almost 15 inches shorter than the larger Outlander, despite the two crossovers sharing the exact same wheelbase and almost the same width. Like a Beverly Hills housewife with a face-lift, this look has to be done correctly or things can quickly turn into a cat-faced disaster. Fortunately, Mitsubishi's corporate face survived the transplant with nary a scar to show for it. A set of 10-spoke 18-inch alloy wheels wearing Goodyear Eagle 225 55R/18 rubber shoes also sit neatly below the ever-so-slightly bulging fenders. These larger wheels come standard on our SE tester, while 16-inchers are standard running gear for the lower-trim ES.

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC side view2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC front view2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC rear view

Inside, the Outlander Sport prefers muted tones, with dark plastic and black cloth the only interior color choices available. Fortunately, the controls are laid out in a simple manner, and we appreciate the climate controls relying on three traditional dials instead of being relegated only to touch-screen control. That screen is left to handle audio and navigation, which it does rather well being responsive to the touch with crips graphics. Pop into Reverse and you'll also get a nice view of what's going on behind the Outlander Sport thanks to the back-up camera that's bundled with the $2,000 nav system.

Unfortunately, laying down two grand for navigation also forces you to opt for the $1,800 Premium package that adds a panoramic glass roof, LED interior mood lighting, a Rockford-Fosgate sound system, Sirius satellite radio and an in-dash six-disc CD changer. All told, you're on the hook for almost $4,000 worth of options if you want the Outlander Sport to tell you where to go.

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC interior2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC front seats2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC paddle shifter2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC tachometer

Sound from the optional Rockford-Fosgate audio system is pushed out to your ears courtesy of nine-speakers, a 10-inch subwoofer in the rear cargo area and 710 watts. Surprisingly balanced, this particular sound system has lost the overbearing bass that used to be a hallmark of Rockford-Fosgate systems.

If you plan on listening to your iPod, Mitsubishi also includes a connector that lets you control the device from the touch-screen or steering wheel-mounted controls. Annoyingly, however, the stereo takes about a minute to recognize the mp3 player each time you turn off the car, and once it does, playback starts from the first song on the unit. It's like teaching your dog to sit, and every time you turn around the pooch forgets where his butt goes. In a word: frustrating.

What's not frustrating is the level of supportive comfort provided by the front seats. Headroom is also a non-issue and visibility is great regardless of where you're looking. The cabin is relatively simple, aside from the touch-screen, but it works in the Outlander Sport's favor.

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC audio system2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC audio system

If you go for a base two-wheel-drive ES model, the Outlander Sport starts at just $19,275. Our all-wheel-drive SE model starts at $22,995 (plus $780 in destination charges), and thanks to a few of those aforementioned fixings reaches $28,570. The Outlander Sport AWD SE's base price, however, is below that of the Honda CR-V EX-L ($26,645), Hyundai Tucson Limited ($26,345) and Kia Sportage EX ($24,795). Equipped like this Outlander Sport, the Kia and the Hyundai are just a few dollar bills away from $30,000 and the Honda climbs past by a Benjamin. So paying over $28,000 for this compact crossover becomes a little more palatable when compared to more expensive competition, and it's made even more so once you raise the hood.

Pull the lever and prop up the sheet metal and you'll see a familiar 4B11 face smiling back at you. Used throughout the Mitsubishi lineup, this 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder engine produces 148 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 145 pound-feet of torque at 4,200 rpm. That may not sound like much oomph to propel the all-wheel-drive Outlander Sport, but at just 3,263 pounds, it feels quicker than it should be.

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC engine

The Outlander Sport isn't fast by any means, but the four-cylinder engine gets the job done while returning 24 miles per gallon around town and 29 mpg on the highway. Two-wheel-drive models do even better at 25 city/31 highway. By contrast, the 2011 Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson and Kia Sportage are 240, 103 and 92 pounds heavier, respectively. Each vehicle also produces more horsepower (32 hp for the Honda and 28 hp for the Kia/Hyundai) and torque (16 lb-ft for the Honda and 23 lb-ft for the Kia/Hyundai) yet return slightly worse fuel economy (21/27 for the Honda and 21/28 for the Kia/Hyundai).

It's not just the weight that helps the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport in the fuel-economy equation. Connected to that 2.0-liter engine is a Continuously Variable Transmission, or CVT, which can be manually "shifted" via a pair of steering wheel-mounted paddles. CVTs are notoriously buzzy contraptions, and the one employed in the Outlander Sport is no exception. Truth be told, the engine and transmission combination would be rather dull without those flippers for manually controlling the fun.

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport rear 3/4 view

The Outlander Sport does have a few tricks up its sleeve besides being able to fake a gear shift. It handles surprisingly well for what's essentially a high-riding, tall-roof wagon. The brakes are quite responsive once you push past the first inch of light pedal travel, but over bumps, the tight Lancer-like suspension reveals some flaws in the Noise Vibration and Harshness department. There was some chatter inside the cabin of our test vehicle and, when rolled down a bit, the windows produced a slight rattle. We could chalk up the window rattle to press-car jitters, but the cabin chatter is probably there to stay.

Those problems aren't enough, however, to make us forget the sporty handling, accommodating interior and competitive pricing of the 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC. Will it become Mitsubishi's third bright spot behind the Lancer and Outlander? The company is crowing that 1,290 units of the Outlander Sport were sold last month. That's peanuts compared to the Honda CR-V, which sold over 19,000 units, but does represent nearly a fifth of the entire brand's sales. That's remarkable for a model only a few months old, and tells us that Mitsubishi is giving buyers exactly what they want.


2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SE AWC

Photos copyright ©2011 Jeff Glucker / AOL


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 63 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is one of those "why bother" vehicles...doesn't set it apart from the competition and doesn't offer anything special either. I'm not sure why they are even still in this marketplace. This product would have worked "fine" 6 years ago,but the competition is 2 generations ahead.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Really has started to grow on me. The pricing is nothing to complain about, and honestly, the styling has grown fairly well on me. It stands out without being ugly. It shows great aggression like the obvious styling source. ;) I really like this a lot. The power isn't the best, but the MPG is a great trade off, especially since fuel economy hasn't been a the selling points for other Mitsubishi.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Seems like a pretty decent offering from Mitsubishi. I like the fuel economy.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It would be, if the KIA Sportage did not exist.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I didn't notice this initially, but only 3200 pounds?!

        Wow.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Notice I said "a decent offering from Mitsubishi".
      • 3 Years Ago
      They need a full lineup.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I test drove this and the Juke, I got the Juke b/c of the power and thought Nissan's reputation was much better. If Mitsu is able to stick it out and increase power, I will certainly look into this model again.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I like the Outlander, but this comes across as looking too chopped. The front says "look, I'm aggressive and aerodynamic," but then the side says "oops I'm too tall and short, just kidding!"
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      My wife and I test drove most of the other competitors and eventually it came down to the Outlander Sport and the CRV. We ended up buying the Mitsu being the much better overall deal. BTW, our observed mpgs during frigid midwestern winters (the Mitsu's AWD system is fabulous, FAR better than the CRV's) was about 25 mpg (calculated the old-fashioned way, not wha the computer says). It does handle extremely well, probably the best in the segment and the steering is very nice and tight. My least favorite part is the buzzy engine due to the CVT and (lack of) acceleration, but this car is not a street racer. It does what it does great.

      BTW, as far as interior quietness, it is waaaay better than the CRV. The other thing the review did not mention is that the Outlander Sport comes with a 5 year/60K bumper-to-bumper warranty and 10 yr/100K powertrain.

      We also test drove the KIA sportage and thought it was a very crappy vehicle comparatively (horrible steering pulling to the right and the ride/interior quality left a lot to be desired). The Equinox felt too big, the RAV4 I don't care about as a vehicle (ugly and very numb steering) and the Escape had very comfortable seats but the ride was too "truck-like", which is what we didn't like about it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        KGavar, you said the Outlander Sport was the best deal but did you really do any research?

        Just some points to think about here:

        1. Did you factor in TCO? The CR-V has the lowest TCO of ownership out of every vehicle in its segment.

        2. Did you factor in resale value? The CR-V has the best residuals in its segment and it is rated in KBB's top 10 vehicles that have the best resale value for 2011, and have won that award for a very long time now. That is ALL vehicles now, not just CUVs.

        My girlfriend had a 2002 Lancer that was flawless (in condition, not mechanicals) in every way and was dealer maintained its whole life. The vehicle was literally falling apart at 100,000 miles when it was sold. Just out of curiousity when she sold it, I checked the residuals on a Civic of the same year, condition, and mileage and it was worth over $6,000 more than her Lancer with a private sale which is what we did.


        3. Did you consider reliability? The CR-V has a sterling record and they are considered bulletrpoof. Mitsubishi doesn't have a great track record nor do they have a strong dealer network to support their product. Who knows if they will even be around in 3 years to support your vehicle.

        4. How do you know the AWD system in your Outlander Sport is "far better" than the CR-Vs? Did you test them in the exact same conditions at the exact same time? It is silly to assume that.


        Sure, you might have gotten a good deal upfront but in the long run you've only hurt yourself. In fact, in the long run you aren't even going to come close to breaking even. This is something that so many consumers never even consider or even really think about.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ Tourian

        Sorry, apologist. I guess you have no clue what an educated guess is, since that is what it was.

        Your company is dead, the public has voted. You are essentially waiting for the inevitable.

        • 3 Years Ago
        There are no ten year old Mitsubish's with the Outlander Sport's drive train, so your method of using data on older cars to predict its TCO is false, just like you are. You can't possibly know how it will react based on the other vehicles (which are better then you make them out to be) and assuming other wise is the same crap that got CR in trouble for assuming every new Toyota would be just as good as the older ones with out testing each model on its own merits.

        Bottom line is, you don't know what you're talking about and the Outlander Sport can be a better choice then a CR-V for some consumers. Get over it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        The only thing I'm waiting on is dumb trolls like you to find somewhere else to be so I don't have to read such drivel, too bad that never happens. You are incapable of making an "educated" guess.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I'll answer to your points one at a time.

        "How do you know the AWD system in your Outlander Sport is "far better" than the CR-Vs? Did you test them in the exact same conditions at the exact same time? It is silly to assume that. "

        I test drove them BOTH on the same day during a midwestern BLIZZARD (yes, I'm completely serious) this last December. You know, the one that paralyzed Chicago. There were very few people on the street except me, my wife, and the car salesperson. It was AWESOME. The CRV did not handle all that well. I'm not saying it was bad, it was just ok, but it did slide at times. It was clearly at its limit. The Outlander on the other hand, I could not get to slide. We took the Mitsu to an empty parking lot that was not cleared and had a few inches of snow. I sped up to probably about 50 mph and slammed the brakes to see what it would do (the salesperson was more than happy to let me do that, too!). The Mitsu did not slide a single bit and stopped very well. I was trying really hard to get that car to slide and I just couldn't.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ Tourian

        TCO based off of other Mitsubishi models for the past 10 years isn't great, what makes you think that this one is going to be any different? You can make an educated guess seeing as it uses the same hardware and powertrain as other models in their lineup.

        As for my girlfriends Lancer, what happened happened, they can't take that back. I had completely lost faith in the company after that vehicle, Evo excluded. I've seen Cavaliers and other crap vehicles last longer than it did with nary a problem. My coworkers had issues with their Mitsubishi products as well, anything from transmission issues to engine issues.

        Tired old story or not, I am basing my opinion off of what I have SEEN first hand and by statistically sound research data available from multiple reputible sources.


        What I have posted is factual information and not an opinion, factual information can't be debated and if it is, well then I don't even know what to say. I understand that he might have felt that he got the best deal for himself, and of course that is an opinion. If he is happy with his purchase, that is all that matters. All I am trying to say is that people often don't look at the WHOLE PICTURE when it comes to vehicle ownership.
        • 3 Years Ago
        The only thing your story proves is that we should all avoid buying the Lancer your GF owned - probably should avoid buying anything she's had. That's a safer and more scientific conclusion then assuming all other Mitsus will give bad service.

        Mitsubishi's 4WD system is very sophisticated and is honed with years of rally and off road motorsports experience. I am positive if Honda was the one that had winning WRC and Dakar experience and not Mitsu you would be touting that as a reason to pick the CR-V, because you obviously have not driven or seen any Mitsubishi with AWD pushed to its limits or observed objective testing of it against other vehicles like them.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Niteflight

        He obviously felt that the Outlander Sport was a better buy for him then the CR-V, you don't know the cost of ownership for a OSport, and you are only guessing about everything else. You sound silly bringing up that tired story of your GF who beat the brakes off her Lancer every time there's a positive Mitsubishi post. Give it a rest.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Regarding TCO,

        I drive my vehicles to the ground, so it doesn't really matter to me. But, regardless, it is sort of a "bogus" number anyway because it assumes MSRP #s. I paid about $22K for a car that had everything except the glass ceiling, upgraded stereo, navigation and leather seats (things that I didn't really want) plus I got 0% 36 month financing. Plus, it has heated seats, which is something I LOVE in a vehicle. Honda could not touch that deal with a ten foot pole.
        • 3 Years Ago
        "My girlfriend had a 2002 Lancer that was flawless (in condition, not mechanicals) in every way and was dealer maintained its whole life. The vehicle was literally falling apart at 100,000 miles when it was sold. Just out of curiousity when she sold it, I checked the residuals on a Civic of the same year, condition, and mileage and it was worth over $6,000 more than her Lancer with a private sale which is what we did."

        Did see give the Lancer away for free? I can find plenty of 100K mile Civics for $6K or less. Also, I can find brand new base Lancers for $13-14K and the cheapest Civics go for about $17-18K (I don't know how comparable they are equipment-wise, but they are probably similar). It's a wash or very close to it if you figure in the higher sales tax you'd pay for the more expensive Civic, annual registration fees (here they are based on the value of the car). BTW, a residual value on a website and what you can actually get in a private party sale can be two very different beasts. I had a Corolla with 100K miles that was "supposed" to be worth $4K on KBB (private party value, in very good mechanical condition, 80% of the miles were highway, pristine inside, I keep my cars very clean). After several months of sitting (didn't even get any phone calls about it), one person did offer me $2500 and I just sold it to him to get rid of it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        And in five years when they are still here selling cars you'll have some other BS excuse. Who cares what you think, really? In five years let us know what your silly GF has done to her current car.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Mitsubishi's drivetrain in the Outlander & Outlander Sport are fairly basic, and not really any different than any other modern CUV.
        Front wheel drive with a clutch to connect the rear differential to the front. [It is COMPLETELY different from what is in the Evo]

        That is conceptually the same as the Honda CR-V, but the difference is that Mitsubishi uses computers/electronics to modulate that clutch pack, where Honda likes to use hydraulics.
        Those electronics allow for pre-emptive clutch engagement from a dead stop.

        Honda's system is the least sophisticated on the market. [besides rudimentary off-road drive systems: pickup trucks, jeep wrangler, etc.]
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just a suggestion, Autoblog, but in the metadata of your review articles, could you put in the MSRP?
      • 3 Years Ago
      I just want to add some points here that I thought of while reading through this article.

      The Outlander Sport has less horsepower, similar fuel economy, an interior that is a bit downmarket compared to its rivals. and less space than all of its direct competition but is priced nearly the same or higher than some when options are added.

      Mitsubishi has a terrible dealer network that is still shrinking and offers terrible customer service. Their vehicles have nonexistent residual values which are some of the worst in the industry, which is likely directly related to a spotty reliability history. Don't forget that the brands future in the US is in serious question.

      It really doesn't sound like that great of a competitor to me, I certainly wouldn't want to take a risk. I still think that this is too much money, especially when you pile on the options.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I have read the article and I've actually driven one myself, but thanks. The Outlander Sport doesn't really stand out from the competition.

        I would expect for you to be disappointed with my OPINION given your screen name for this site.
        • 3 Years Ago
        +1 for Nightflight

        If it's worth anything (and knowing you guys it probably isn't) we just picked up a 2011 Equinox 2LT loaded for $28k. Not once did we even consider the Outlander, because of the dealer network and the fact Mitsubishi is more or less dying. If a paying customer's (who considers themselves somewhat of a car person, nonetheless) account doesn't prove it, I don't know what does.
        • 3 Years Ago
        ok...did you even READ the article?? apparently not. Try again, this time "click past the jump"
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ Matt
        So you are wanting us to believe you test drove and considered every other competitor in the segment against your Equinox except the Outlander Sport? I don't believe you.

        This story isn't about people who didn't test the Outlander Sport or were prejudiced against it for whatever reason. Its for people who would consider it based on the vehicle's own capabilities.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Wow.

        Mitsubishi apologists are clueless. You guys have blinders on to what is happening. The company is dying, you don't see it and choose to ignore it. People post facts, you don't believe them. The company hasn't produced a single competitive vehicle in the past 10 years aside from the Evo and maybe, MAYBE the current Outlander.

        Believe whatever you want, Mitsubishi is a crap company that produces crap vehicles (aside from the Evo). The public has voted, and mark my word, the company will exit the US within the next 5 years. There is no saving grace for Mitsubishi.

        Vote me down, I couldn't care less. All it does is prove how ignorant you are.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Mitsubishi is like Suzuki. If they disappeared tomorrow, no one would notice.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Well actually, even if Mitsubishi DID disappear off of the car market, it probably would not have the biggest impact that we believe it would. Mitsubishi as a corporation makes a hell of a lot more things than just cars. They're a Japanese juggernaut. Hell, I have an old Mitsubishi cellphone kicking around somewhere in my closet!
        • 3 Years Ago
        Kinda like you perhaps?
        • 3 Years Ago
        Mitsubishi still makes cars? Who knew? ;)
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ darex

        Suzuki did themselves NO favors by rebadging those terrible Daewoo vehicles. In fact, that might have been one of their death blows dealt by themselves. What a horrible decision that was.

        That being said, I'd rather have a Kizashi or a SX4 than anything in Mitsubishi's lineup, EVO excluded.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Suzuki's actual reputation is superior to Mitsubishi's too (by "actual", I mean the cars Suzuki makes [forget about the re-badged Daewoos] as well as their reputation around the world), but it may be too late for either. Sad. At least Suzuki has motorcycles too, and they're well-respected. What does Mitsubishi have?
        • 3 Years Ago
        I doubt Suzuki is going to leave the US market. They stayed all through the 1990's selling very few cars here. I think I remember sales numbers of the Esteem at like 4800 for the year in like 97. The US is just a side market for them.
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Mitsubishi is giving buyers exactly what they want"

      All I can say is, keep it up. Buyers clearly don't want anything currently being built in Normal, Illinois (until Lancer production moves there).
        • 3 Years Ago
        Isn't Mitsu completely re-vamping their product portfolio for the US in the next few years?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @NightFlight:

        I completely agree. It was like one year they couldn't produce Eclipses and Montero Sports fast enough to keep up with demand, and the next day their product portfolio completely fell apart. I think the US market just suffered from neglect after some corporate shake-ups back home in Japan.

        They've got quite a bit of work to do before I'll say they're "giving buyers exactly what they want."

        ...But that said, I think the Outlander Sport is a great vehicle. I couldn't see myself plucking down $28k for the tester, but I'd probably rather purchase a more lightly optioned model than all of the competition named in this review.

        The styling is nice, especially in that distinctive turquoise metallic (although the rear end does look a little dated to me for some reason). I saw one in person the other day and realized it's actually REALLY small (in a good way). It would be a fine daily driver or "downsize vehicle" that's a little more distinctive and fun to drive than the Honda crowd.

        Now what are we going to do about your pathetic Galant, Mitsu?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @NightFlight: You forgot to mention that the Lancer is also very ugly and looks 15 years old, brand-new. :-)
        • 3 Years Ago
        But the problem is that not many people really want the Lancer. I just read a terrible review of one from Car and Driver or Motor Trend, I can't remember which one. They really didn't have too much praise for the vehicle at all.

        I know they aren't going to anytime soon, but Mitsubishi REALLY needs to replace the Galant and the Endevour. CUVs and midsize sedans are hot sellers now, and they need a decent offering in order to compete. They also need to get the Colt here ASAP!

        We all know that Mitsubishi is capable of doing great things, but I want to know what happened to the company in the past 10-15 years.
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