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MyFord Touch – Click above for high-res image gallery

The Blue Oval's MyFord Touch infotainment system is a powerful bit of kit, so it's perhaps understandable that there's proving to be a fairly substantial learning curve attached to it.

Thus, it's no surprise that Ford salespeople are spending more time than normal with car buyers to explain how it all works. But as the old sales chestnut says, time is money, so Ford will reportedly compensate its sales force by providing $75 for every vehicle sold with the MyFord Touch system. This also applies to Lincoln models sold with the MyLincoln Touch system. In addition to the $75 MyFord Touch bounty, Ford is also providing $50 for any vehicle sold with Sync. The move by Dearborn is to assure that sales people take the necessary time to teach buyers how to master the system, and thus avoid disgruntled owners.

Despite the lack of a 'Recomended' rating from Consumer Reports, Ford is forging full steam ahead with its MyFord Touch system. By 2015, the automaker plans to make it available on 80 percent of its lineup.


  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyLincoln Touch, shown here with a user-customized home screen.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack. (low resolution image)
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • MyLincoln Touch driver connect technology uses touch-sensitive technology to operate dash buttons along with the volume and fan controls.
  • The electronic finish panel (EFP) on the 2011 Lincoln MKX demonstrates all the advantages of touch-sensitive technology and the MyLincoln Touch 8-inch touch screen display in a beautiful, engaging package.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • MyLincoln Touch displays information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer and an 8-inch touch-screen LCD at the top of the center stack.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the climate control screen active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with a user-customized home screen.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with a user-customized home screen.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with a user-customized home screen.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the audio and entertainment screen active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, here displaying audio and entertainment system options.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the navigation destination entry screen active.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer. This is the right screen with entertainment options active.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer. This is the left screen with trip computer, fuel gauge and bar tachometer selected.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer. This is the right screen with entertainment options active.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer. This is the right screen with phone options active.
  • MyFord Touch displays much of its information using two 4.2-inch full-color LCD screens flanking an analog speedometer. This is the left screen with tachometer, fuel gauge and Adaptive Cruise Control settings active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the text message entry screen active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the phone screen active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with audio and entertainment options active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with audio and entertainment options active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with available 3D mapping active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with audio and entertainment options active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with vehicle settings active, in this case providing ambient lighting control. (low resolution image)
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with 911 Assist active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with audio and entertainment options active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with available 3D mapping active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with available 3D mapping active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with available 3D mapping active.
  • The 8-inch touch-screen center stack display is the key interface on MyFord Touch, shown here with the available on-screen browser active.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Nobody at the dealership when I bought my brand new 2009 Fusion had a clue about how to use SYNC. It was sad how the main selling point for me was a mystery to everyone at Al Piemonte Ford in Melrose Park, Illinois.

      I can see that same dealer collecting the $75 / $50 and still not knowing or explaining anything about MyFord Touch and SYNC.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Al Piemonte Ford is by far the worse Ford Dealership ive ever been to.. back in 2006 when the Fusion first came out i went to purchase one and they denied me.. a week later i went to a different dealer and purchased one without any problem.. i was literally IN and OUT with a new Fusion in less than 1hour!!
        • 4 Years Ago
        I don't mean to rag on car salepeople, but... here goes: On a number of occasions, I've actually told the saleperson what options, engine sizes, mpg, yr to yr changes... a manufacturer has designated to its models and it was "NEWS" to that salesperson. I mean, I keep up with many manufacturers models' details, and all they have to do it study one brand's lineup. You wouldn't think that would be all that difficult... given it's their JOB.

        Ok, so not every salesperson fell short of the facts, but enough did to give me a somewhat weak impression of their knowledge.


      • 4 Years Ago
      It's not that the system is too complicated, because it really isn't very hard to learn at all. One or two days behind the wheel should be enough for most people willing to read and learn to become comfortable with it.

      The problem with "disgruntled owners" results from Ford employing a bunch of amateur programmers and rushing the system to market. Make no mistake, this is a completely in-house Ford production, Microsoft has little to do with this fiasco. And it's looking like Ford simply does't know how to fix their many many bugs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I found it pretty simple to use, however I see no possible way that anyone over 65 could ever figure it out. The most frustrating part of it was how slow to respond everything was. Hopefully Ford rolls out a MyTouch 2.0 that is faster in the near future.
      • 4 Years Ago
      For $75 a piece I will massage & heat their shoulders and they wont even have to get in the car.
      • 4 Years Ago
      so tell me ...boxtavious..do you go to a grocery store and act like an a$$ because you are a customer? How about when you go to the bank? How about when you go to Dairy Queen? It isn't about not wanting to deal with a customer..it's about dealing with someone who has no respect for a person because of what they do for a living. I wasn't complaining..I was stating a fact. Yes I signed up for the gig and I know what it requires and I am successful at it. Maybe you are just upset because you are the dude cleaning the toilets at night.
      CheckTheseOut
      • 4 Years Ago
      Man...... where's the knob????
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am curious if you can do this...

      Have all these settings in a phone app, which would let you fiddle with them even when you are not in your car. Then when you get in your car, it uploads all your settings into the car to the exact what you want it.

      That way, if there are multiple drivers, each person can have the settings just the way they like it.


      Anyways, beyond that, I really think most of these systems are complete overkill, and this is coming from someone that is a huge tech-nerd. The vast, vast, vast majority of people would never changes any of these settings from how they came from the factory, and the ones that do, will change a few things once or twice when the car is new and never touch these settings again. As much as I love technology, I actually LIKE simply interiors.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I like how it says sponsored by Lexus right above the picture for the MyTouch interface...

      Personally would prefer buttons for heating and lighting so you can turn it on and off without looking at a touch screen, which should only delegate non essentials like music and navigation...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good, but isn't this something the salesmen should probably be doing as part of their job anyway?
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Polly Prissy Pants

        Good to know people in my line of work are a complete drain on society.


        This is good customer service and how excellent example of business should be conducted between the retailer and the customer.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ross,

        I have found out that in 90% of the case, I know much more about the car than the salespeople do.
        It is pretty sad really.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You would think so, but it's ultimately up to the consumer. The sales staff can offer to give a new owner a quick run-thru of the system --- the owner will just blow them off and drive away. I best most of them assume it's just like something they've used before and don't think about it until they're on the road and need to use it. Wrong time to learn.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Most salespeople know very little about the product they're selling. That's why they're a waste of time and resources to all but the very clueless.
      • 4 Years Ago
      If I would rather teach myself than have a salesman "teach" me, will Ford just give the money directly to me?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Its pretty sad when manufacturers have to pay their sales personnel to actually, you know, SHOW people their new vehicle's features. Sheesh. But as others have mentioned, most sales people dont know much about the products theyre selling, sadly. I remember working at a Nissan dealer back out of high school, and they were shocked and in complete awe when I showed them that if you held down the unlock button on the Maxima's key fob, it rolled down the windows for you. Youd figure a nice, simple feature such as that would have been known amongst salesmen, but noooooo.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Many of the (cool) things tech heads know aren't knowledge to many salesmen...I have learned things from consumers because I was never told of the technology. The extra money would be given upon a delivery checklist signed by the consumer and would be audited by Ford. Unless you work at a dealership you have no clue what we as salespeople have to know and stay on top of. There is more to selling a car than knowing how a radio works. Even more ironic is how the customer wants you to go over everything when they are looking at the car and then buy from the guy down the road who did nothing but beat the price by $50...and yes...it happens all the time. Salesmen have families, bills to pay and many more stresses that you don't see when you walk into a dealership...are there bad salesmen yes...i would never say that there aren't...but maybe try and not be such a hard a$$...and you might get the respect you want...and still get a good deal
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'll be honest, I have absolutely no sympathy for a car salesman who complains when customers act like customers. You signed up for the gig, if you don't like it, then change jobs. Sure you have a family to feed, but this is the life YOU CHOSE. If I ever hear the line about "having to feed my family" I'll find a new salesman. You complaining about customers is like a janitor complaining they have to clean toilets.
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