2020 BMW M2

2020 M2 Photos
The 2020 BMW M2 CS is a victory lap for BMW, and a well-deserved one at that. After five years of making the lovely M2 and subsequent M2 Competition, BMW has every right to pat itself on the back. It's a masterpiece. And although we're a little late to the party, finally getting our chance behind the wheel just as the last ones depart dealers, at least we get the chance to add our hands to the chorus of applause.  Spiritually, the M2 has become the successor to BMW’s first few generations of M3, as the M3/M4 pair grow in both size and weight with each passing iteration. The M2 managed to slot in below those stalwarts as a refreshingly small and squat little coupe with hardly any space for backseat passengers. It’s lighter than an M4, filled with fewer luxuries and amenities, and drives like the small car it is. That makes the M2 a fundamentally better place to start from if fun-to-drive performance is priority number one. But as performance hierarchies go, the M2 has always had a “but” when compared to BMW’s flagship M3/M4. The M2 handles incredibly well, but you can’t have adaptive dampers. The M2 is quick and makes a great noise, but it’s down on power and slower than an M4. I could go on, but! This M2 CS model is what happens if you remove the but from the equation. Finally. From the spec sheet, the CS is exactly what a BMW enthusiast with unlimited pocketbooks would piece together to create the ultimate M2. You don’t even need to put wheels and tires on the car, because you can spec the most gorgeous, light-gold, forged wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, the stickiest street legal rubber out there. The laundry list of hot rodding goes on. The M2 CS inherited the previous-generation M3/M4 engine. There’s no leash holding this S55 power plant back either, as it makes the full 444 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque produced by the last-generation M3/M4. It’s basically the engine swap every M2 owner has wanted for years. To it, BMW bolted an exhaust that sounds ripped straight off the Loud Pipes ‘R Us cutting room floor — I promise, there’s no need for anything aftermarket here. Of course, the list continues. BMW finally fits its adaptive dampers to the M2 CS after only offering fixed dampers to every previous M2. The carbon ceramic brakes are also optional on an M2 for the first time. And no need to touch the exterior styling. It’s outfitted with all the carbon fiber extras you could possibly want — hood, roof, mirrors, splitter, spoiler and diffuser. Plus, you can and should spec it in Misano Blue Metallic. Believe me, when these inevitably start showing up for auction, the white and black ones won't be commanding the same premium.  Stepping into the driver’s seat, though, I’m slightly miffed by the questionably selective lightweighting. BMW scrapped keyless entry for the …
Full Review
The 2020 BMW M2 CS is a victory lap for BMW, and a well-deserved one at that. After five years of making the lovely M2 and subsequent M2 Competition, BMW has every right to pat itself on the back. It's a masterpiece. And although we're a little late to the party, finally getting our chance behind the wheel just as the last ones depart dealers, at least we get the chance to add our hands to the chorus of applause.  Spiritually, the M2 has become the successor to BMW’s first few generations of M3, as the M3/M4 pair grow in both size and weight with each passing iteration. The M2 managed to slot in below those stalwarts as a refreshingly small and squat little coupe with hardly any space for backseat passengers. It’s lighter than an M4, filled with fewer luxuries and amenities, and drives like the small car it is. That makes the M2 a fundamentally better place to start from if fun-to-drive performance is priority number one. But as performance hierarchies go, the M2 has always had a “but” when compared to BMW’s flagship M3/M4. The M2 handles incredibly well, but you can’t have adaptive dampers. The M2 is quick and makes a great noise, but it’s down on power and slower than an M4. I could go on, but! This M2 CS model is what happens if you remove the but from the equation. Finally. From the spec sheet, the CS is exactly what a BMW enthusiast with unlimited pocketbooks would piece together to create the ultimate M2. You don’t even need to put wheels and tires on the car, because you can spec the most gorgeous, light-gold, forged wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, the stickiest street legal rubber out there. The laundry list of hot rodding goes on. The M2 CS inherited the previous-generation M3/M4 engine. There’s no leash holding this S55 power plant back either, as it makes the full 444 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque produced by the last-generation M3/M4. It’s basically the engine swap every M2 owner has wanted for years. To it, BMW bolted an exhaust that sounds ripped straight off the Loud Pipes ‘R Us cutting room floor — I promise, there’s no need for anything aftermarket here. Of course, the list continues. BMW finally fits its adaptive dampers to the M2 CS after only offering fixed dampers to every previous M2. The carbon ceramic brakes are also optional on an M2 for the first time. And no need to touch the exterior styling. It’s outfitted with all the carbon fiber extras you could possibly want — hood, roof, mirrors, splitter, spoiler and diffuser. Plus, you can and should spec it in Misano Blue Metallic. Believe me, when these inevitably start showing up for auction, the white and black ones won't be commanding the same premium.  Stepping into the driver’s seat, though, I’m slightly miffed by the questionably selective lightweighting. BMW scrapped keyless entry for the …
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Retail Price

$58,900 - $83,600 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
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Engine 3.0L I-6
MPG 18 City / 25 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd man w/OD
Power 405 @ 5230 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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