Base 4dr 4x2
2016 INFINITI QX50

MSRP

$34,450
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
EngineEngine 3.7LV-6
MPGMPG 17 City / 24 Hwy
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2016 QX50 Overview

One crucial change to the 2016 Infiniti QX50 (formerly known as the EX35) may have just made the company's smallest crossover suddenly relevant. So how does one add appeal to an eight-year-old model, without any significant cosmetic or powertrain updates? By addressing its biggest flaw head-on: size. For the 2016 model year, Infiniti has stretched the QX50's wheelbase by 3.2 inches, and the crossover is now 4.5 inches longer overall. In addition to a roomier cabin – 8.3 cubic feet more to be exact – there's one number that sticks out above all else: four more inches of knee- and leg-room in the back seats. Like scoring an exit-row seat on your flight, the extra space may be just enough to change the experience. So how can the upmarket Japanese automaker justify costly changes to the platform when it's only moving 250 of these vehicles in the US per month? Americans can thank the Chinese for that. As in the US, sales of small crossovers are quickly rising in China – a country where being chauffeured is more common for those of means – and rear-seat passengers who can pay for a driver don't want to feel like they're sitting in the penalty box. The platform-sharing economics work, and in this case, everyone stands to benefit. Pricing is reduced by $500 from last year, with the rear-wheel-drive 2016 QX50 now starting at $35,445 after delivery. Infiniti says it considers the Acura RDX and Lexus NX as the QX50's direct competition, but it's worth noting that both of those competing models sell more in just one month than Infiniti's smallest crossover sold all of last year. The QX50 isn't likely to reach its competitor's levels anytime soon, but Infiniti hopes the roomier iteration will pique shopper interest. To help that cause, the 2016 model gets a few light cosmetic touches too. Up front it receives a new grille that's more in line with the brand's current design language, new LED fog and daytime running lights, new door mirrors with LED turn signals, revised side sills, and a new rear bumper. Beyond aesthetics, pricing is reduced by $500 from last year, with the rear-wheel-drive 2016 QX50 now starting at $35,445 after delivery. The all-wheel-drive version adds another $1,400 to that price. All models get more standard equipment, including a power moonroof, heated front seats, and the new LED accents. Inside the cabin, things look much as they did when the crossover first debuted as the EX35, back in 2007. Small upgrades have followed through the years, and despite its age, the cabin still feels premium, comfortable, and familiar. The lone engine option carries over, Infiniti's 3.7-liter V6, good for 325 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque. Some of the buttons and switches are recognizable from more pedestrian Nissan models, but we can overlook that, thanks to some neat features. Infiniti was the first to offer an optional electronically controlled rear seat that allows you to bring either or both sections of the …
Full Review

2016 QX50 Overview

One crucial change to the 2016 Infiniti QX50 (formerly known as the EX35) may have just made the company's smallest crossover suddenly relevant. So how does one add appeal to an eight-year-old model, without any significant cosmetic or powertrain updates? By addressing its biggest flaw head-on: size. For the 2016 model year, Infiniti has stretched the QX50's wheelbase by 3.2 inches, and the crossover is now 4.5 inches longer overall. In addition to a roomier cabin – 8.3 cubic feet more to be exact – there's one number that sticks out above all else: four more inches of knee- and leg-room in the back seats. Like scoring an exit-row seat on your flight, the extra space may be just enough to change the experience. So how can the upmarket Japanese automaker justify costly changes to the platform when it's only moving 250 of these vehicles in the US per month? Americans can thank the Chinese for that. As in the US, sales of small crossovers are quickly rising in China – a country where being chauffeured is more common for those of means – and rear-seat passengers who can pay for a driver don't want to feel like they're sitting in the penalty box. The platform-sharing economics work, and in this case, everyone stands to benefit. Pricing is reduced by $500 from last year, with the rear-wheel-drive 2016 QX50 now starting at $35,445 after delivery. Infiniti says it considers the Acura RDX and Lexus NX as the QX50's direct competition, but it's worth noting that both of those competing models sell more in just one month than Infiniti's smallest crossover sold all of last year. The QX50 isn't likely to reach its competitor's levels anytime soon, but Infiniti hopes the roomier iteration will pique shopper interest. To help that cause, the 2016 model gets a few light cosmetic touches too. Up front it receives a new grille that's more in line with the brand's current design language, new LED fog and daytime running lights, new door mirrors with LED turn signals, revised side sills, and a new rear bumper. Beyond aesthetics, pricing is reduced by $500 from last year, with the rear-wheel-drive 2016 QX50 now starting at $35,445 after delivery. The all-wheel-drive version adds another $1,400 to that price. All models get more standard equipment, including a power moonroof, heated front seats, and the new LED accents. Inside the cabin, things look much as they did when the crossover first debuted as the EX35, back in 2007. Small upgrades have followed through the years, and despite its age, the cabin still feels premium, comfortable, and familiar. The lone engine option carries over, Infiniti's 3.7-liter V6, good for 325 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque. Some of the buttons and switches are recognizable from more pedestrian Nissan models, but we can overlook that, thanks to some neat features. Infiniti was the first to offer an optional electronically controlled rear seat that allows you to bring either or both sections of the …Hide Full Review