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Ruf, the storied Porsche tuner, has made an announcement that it is still building its RCT Evo, even though the 911 it's based on went out of production 27 years ago. Based on the 964, the original Ruf RCT Evo debuted in 1993, and as the company's website says, "if it's still popular, don't stop making it."

Why the company has decided to make a new announcement now is unclear. Perhaps the recent renaissance of 964 tuners from Singer to Rauh Welt has created a new generation of demand for hopped-up versions of the once-neglected air-cooled flat-sixer. In any case, Ruf would like you to know that for €350,000 ($425,200 USD and, oh, you need to supply your own base car), it can still build you what is essentially a new and improved 964.

After all, Ruf Automobile goes through the cars so thoroughly that they're considered a standalone automaker and issues their own VINs on body-in-white cars obtained from Stuttgart. Famously, when early Gran Turismo games couldn't negotiate the use of the Porsche license, they simply inked a deal with Ruf to pixelate cars like the legendary 1987 CTR Yellowbird instead.

The RCT Evo takes the original 3.6-liter engine and modifies it to high heaven, generating 425PS (419 horsepower) and 420 lb-ft of torque. While this seems timid in an age of milli-equus supercars, remember that the original 964 had only 247 in the stable. Plus, the Ruf offers an optional and more aerodynamic than stock carbon-fiber body, a chassis-stiffening roll cage, center-lock wheels, and new carbon-ceramic brakes.

Besides, the point of a car like this isn't necessarily the speed. A new 992 might be fun — and it is — but there's something to be said for driving an analog chassis.

"While the technology has evolved since 1990, the formula for a fun car has not,” head of marketing Estonia Ruf said in a statement. "The car has the same feeling you might expect from a 964, but with more power and less weight for a higher overall performance." In other words, she continued, "The recipe didn’t change, the ingredients just got better."

Porsche 911 Information

Porsche 911

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