Despite all of the national publicity and Congressional hearings, General Motors may never fix all of the roughly 2.6 million vehicles involved in its ignition switch recall. The automaker may never get the chance – many owners simply don't have recalled vehicles serviced, regardless of the danger.

Since the automaker announced the first recall, it took months for Delphi to have enough improved parts on hand to supply them to dealers. With parts in place, GM's repairs were scheduled to begin on April 7. The company isn't discussing specific data on the number of vehicles repaired so far. "We're on track," said GM spokesperson Jim Cain to Autoblog about its progress. "Every day, parts availability improves."

However, there still could be hundreds of thousands of affected vehicles without the repair on the road in the coming years. According to a report by CNN Money, GM generally sees recall rates of 80 percent of cars within a year and 85 percent within two years. This is higher than the industry average of about 66 percent of models actually getting serviced. But even if 85 percent of them are repaired, it means about 390,000 cars on the road will still be left in need of the fix.

There are many reasons why an affected vehicle might not be repaired. Some people don't think they have the time to take their car in, despite the fact that GM struck a deal with several rental car agencies to ensure owners a loaner vehicle while the affected models were being fixed. It can also be hard to track down owners of older vehicles for recalls. The company might be trying to fix these cars for a long time to come.


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  • 28 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Lunch
      • 1 Year Ago
      What did you expect from GM? Quality and care for their customers? In your dreams.
      domingorobusto
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh noes!!! THE DANGER!!! Of ignoring a recall for an issue experienced by what, 0.0001% of these cars? How will they ever live with THE DANGER?!?!?
      finzenchrome
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's because a lot of them are already in the junkyard.
      FrosenCarrotz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Couldn't the same be said for every recall from other companies as well? I have a recall notice for my car regarding the shifter, but I don't find it an issue and don't have the time to go to the dealer so I just ignore it.
        SloopJohnB
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FrosenCarrotz
        Pity…because deliberate failure to accomplish a recall will be argued to constitute contributory negligence in those states that accept contributory negligence in tort. In other words, if you live in a state that uses contributory negligence to adjust tort claims and are involved in an accident relative to the recall you ignore and any damages you may deserve, you may be SOL because you didn't do the recall.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          [blocked]
          tiger
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          @ lamazing - said owner would have to be living under a rock to not have heard of said recall. I would venture to guess that every owner of one of these cars has heard about the recall. Well, except those 2 or 3 that live under rocks.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          [blocked]
      bK
      • 1 Year Ago
      So they are like the more people don't realize this recall the better for us...
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd like to visit craigslist and find the most dangerous sketch $300 barely running beater that's on the recall list, and take it to the dealer.
      BGJ
      • 1 Year Ago
      This just in, the sun sets in the West.
      TERRY K
      • 1 Year Ago
      it's okay if they never fix the cars, as long as the good old boys and old girls, get their big checks, after all, so what if a few people have to die, as long as they get paid, so what. people die everyday, to bad it's not them and their children. if one of their children or wives, mothers or father or grand parents, they would get the cars fixed then.
      auhll57
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have a 1999 Dodge Grand Caravan Sport with over 238,000 miles on it. Last year the air bag light came on then about 6 months later the cruise control and horn stopped working. Went on the internet and found a recall of the "clock spring" in the steering wheel. Called the 1-800 number on a Sunday afternoon and actually got a real person from Chrysler to answer and she set up an appointment for the recall for free. So you just never know when someone will bring "it" by for their recall.
        icerabbit
        • 1 Year Ago
        @auhll57
        Mine was the other way around. We were notified of that recall, via a snail mail yellow card, years ago. It stated there was a recall and to take the vehicle in IF / WHEN the airbag light remained illuminated. If not, then not needed. I lost audio control, then cruise control and then the horn, probably over the course of two years, maybe even longer. Never putting the two together or having known what/where that clock spring is, I didn't want to spend money on fixing the steering wheel (though I hated not having a horn for emergencies) as the van is getting up there in miles & age, and I'm saving for a replacement vehicle; so I just kept driving it. Then suddenly the airbag light remained on. Pulled out the recall card. Made a dealer appointment for service. The nearest dealer wanted two appointments! One to verify the issue + order the parts, then bring it in for actual service. Took it to the second closest Chrysler dealer, on a scheduled appointment (to be 1 hr long) and waited 5 hours ( came in by 9 & left after 2pm ) Anyhow. By magic everything on my steering wheel was working again!
      tiger
      • 1 Year Ago
      Guessing that at least 10% of these cars are probably out of service, sitting in a salvage yard due to accident, neglect or mechanical... So, assuming stated statistics, only 5% of the cars would still be left on the road. GM should offer free oil changes or other services to get the stragglers in after the dust settles and most cars are repaired. I think they should offer a mobile repair sercive on these as well. The repair only takes a couple common hand tools and can be fixed in a parking lot or driveway in less than 30 minutes.
        SloopJohnB
        • 1 Year Ago
        @tiger
        ??? Probably 70% or more of these cars are still in service. If the were Toyota Corrollas, probably 80-90%.
          tiger
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          Had a Corolla once. I bought it new and put 70,000 miles on it in 4 years. I changed the oil every 3,000 - 5,000 miles but the engine still sludged up. Toyota rolled over on even though this was a known problem and I had every single oil change done at the SAME Toyota dealer with all the service records to prove it. Scrapped the car. I bought a new Cobalt. 260,000 miles later, never, ever, ever a problem. I am still driving it and plan to until it croaks on me. In other words, not sure I believe your 80-90%.
          blasds78
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          I had a Grand Am once. At 80k primarily highway miles, the transmission was replaced. It was replaced (not rebuilt) again at 105k miles. After the second new transmission, the 4 year old car was traded for a Camry that's still in service with 315k miles, with only scheduled and routine maintenance. So...does that offset your point (whatever it was?) High mileage cars can be found in any brand.
          jtav2002
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          I love people who don't believe someones statistic because they had ONE car that failed them.
        carboy55
        • 1 Year Ago
        @tiger
        Had a Lumina once. By 110,000 miles the interior had crevices wide enough to lose my wallet in. Transmission solenoid went out three times before I sold it to some poor sucker.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @carboy55
          [blocked]
      Matt Frawley
      • 1 Year Ago
      it will be never a classic Cobalt future.
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