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16NASCAR driver Tyler Walker pleads guilty following three-state police chase

Tyler Walker has a bit of a drug problem. It's what got him kicked out of NASCAR, what possessed him to lead police on a high-speed chase across Nevada, Utah and into Arizona, and what finally got him arrested. Now two years later, he's plead guilty to a litany of charges, and will be sentenced in February.

AddSaab owners NEVS denied creditor protection by Swedish court

The story of Saab is practically a Greek tragedy at this point. The quirky Swedish automaker that was once known as a pioneer of affordable turbocharging has been followed by years of news that just seemed to keep getting worse. At this point, maybe the brand name should be allowed to fade away into the ether and be remembered for the good times that it gave us.

95Driving while using medical marijuana not necessarily illegal in Michigan

It's going to be a while before we've figured out our brave new marijuana-approved world. The next lesson comes courtesy of the Michigan Supreme Court, which has reportedly ruled that it isn't necessarily against the law for a medical marijuana user to drive with the drug in their system. The ruling comes after motorist Rodney Koon was busted for doing 83 miles per hour in a 55-mph zone and tested positive for "internal possession of marijuana."

39Toyota unintended acceleration lawsuit settled for $16M

Slowly, the many loose threads still dangling after the unintended acceleration issue Toyota faced a few years ago are being resolved. The Orange County District Attorney's office was believed to be the first DA's office to take Toyota to court, its suit alleging that Toyota knew its cars had defects and continued to sell them. The suit sought to "permanently enjoin Toyota from continued unlawful, unfair, deceptive, and fraudulent business practices as it pertains to both consumers and competito

AddGM may face $918-million loss due to suit stemming from bankruptcy

General Motors may see a loss of $918 million should a bankruptcy judge rule certain hedge funds were favored over other investors during the automaker's 2009 restructuring. A trust representing a number of unsecured creditors has sued to undo a lock-up agreement that saw hedge funds receive around $367 million while other creditors were left to recover a slim fraction of their original investments. The creditors claim the agreement was unfair and that it took place after after the bankruptcy fi

AddBMW 'astonished' after losing intellectual property case

BMW has been tussling in courtrooms with a South African auto parts supplier called Grandmark for 13 years. The real issue revolves, of course, around money, but the legal issue revolves around intellectual property rights regarding the design of car parts. South Africa allows entities to register an "Aesthetic Design" (AD) that "is new and original, and that has features which 'appeal to and are judged solely by the eye';" BMW has received Aesthetic Design registrations for both its vehicles an

116Saudi man sentenced to beheading by sword for joyriding deaths

A Saudi man in his thirties, identified by the name Mutannish in reports, has been sentenced to death for causing two onlookers to die during a driving demonstration of Hagwalah – one of the wild displays of drifting we're used to seeing from that part of the world. During the show, two were killed when a person in the audience was hit and fell onto another. The driver then sped off, failing to provide any assistance. His sentence was likely influenced by the fact that he went into hiding

8Judge says Chrysler doesn't have to reinstate closed dealers

Chrysler made the difficult (and controversial) decision in 2009 to close 789 dealerships leading up to the automaker's abbreviated bankruptcy. The move helped Chrysler eliminate some redundancies and limit in-brand competition, but many of the dealers who lost their franchises weren't at all pleased with the move.

3Waltrip, Williams racing teams settle lawsuit out of court

Racing fans on either side of the Atlantic may be familiar with the name Mike Coughlan. The controversial engineer was at the heart of the Spygate scandal between the McLaren and Ferrari teams a few years back and was subsequently ejected from Formula One. While he was waiting for his banishment to expire, he came over to the U.S. where he was working for Michael Waltrip Racing in NASCAR. But as soon as his sentence was up, he was back in F1 with the Williams team. Trouble is, his contract with

26Saab request for government protection rejected by Swedish court

Seems that Saab just can't catch a break. Yesterday, the Swedish automaker filed for government protection, citing that if approved, the company would undergo a voluntary reorganization. Now, a court has rejected Saab's application for protection.

50Kyle Busch loses license for 45 days for speeding in Lexus LFA [w/poll]

We said it once, and we'll say it again: it's a good thing racing drivers aren't required to hold a valid driver's license in order to race. We know it sounds funny, but if they did, some of our best drivers would be out of work.

27Lamborghini sues Vegas restaurant and exotic car dealer for trademark infringement

Does the logo at right remind you of anything? If you answered "Lamborghini", you're both right and wrong. Because it's not the Bolognese automaker's logo. Nor is it the emblem of the Tonino Lamborghini product design company, which is in fact no longer directly associated with the sportscar manufacturer. It doesn't even belong to the South American outfit that was once licensed by Sant'Agata to use the name, or the tractor company that started it all.

2Audi denied TDI trademark by European court

As much as it has with the Quattro brand, Audi (and its parent company Volkswagen) have more recently turned the letters TDI into an emblem of what it stands for as an automaker. Think of those three letters and you could picture no other marque, that's how closely intertwined the two have become. But an attempt to enshrine that much in law has apparently failed.

13Audi denied TDI trademark by European court

As much as it has with the Quattro brand, Audi (and its parent company Volkswagen) have more recently turned the letters TDI into an emblem of what it stands for as an automaker. Think of those three letters and you could picture no other marque, that's how closely intertwined the two have become. But an attempt to enshrine that much in law has apparently failed.

65Kia hit with $40M judgment in faulty seatbelt death case

Alabama teen Tiffany Stabler got a 1999 Kia Sephia for her sixteenth birthday in 2004. After her father purchased the car, he took it to a Kia dealership to have all of the maintenance and recall work completed. In 2002, Kia had recalled seatbelt buckles on 1995-1998 Sephias and Sportages for a condition called "false latching," wherein a belt appears to be locked into the buckle but actually isn't. Stabler's car wasn't part of the recall, even though the 1999 and 2000 Sephias used the same buck

25Judge's ruling paves way for owners to sue Toyota over economic losses *UPDATE

If Toyota was hoping to end its ongoing unintended acceleration-related legal issues, the latest bit of courtroom news will make the automaker quite unhappy. U.S. District Judge James Selna has ruled that vehicle owners can sue Toyota over economic losses. Some Toyota owners claim the automaker is responsible for diminished resale value of vehicles wearing the Toyota badge.

14Jenson Button sues Brawn-Mercedes for championship-winning car

To the victor go the spoils. It's an age-old adage, and with good reason. But after winning the world championship last year, Jenson Button had another battle on his hands.

2Max Mosley, Sebastien Bourdais settle individual lawsuits

Those who bemoan modern Formula One settling its rivalries in the courtroom instead of on the race track have another set of examples to bring up at the pub as news emerges of the settlement of two lawsuits related to the top-tier racing series have emerged over the course of the weekend.

34REPORT: Chrysler unlikely to pay back most recent $4.5 billion gov't loan

Repayment of the $4.5 billion life-line in U.S. and Canadian loans that a federal bankruptcy court allowed yesterday is "highly unlikely," according to Ron Manzo, a top company adviser. To Chrysler's bankruptcy legal team, that is not the issue. Urging the court "to let this company live," automaker attorney Corinne Ball said "the survival of Chrysler's business is at stake in these proceedings, as is the fate of hundreds of suppliers and thousands of Chrysler dealers around the country."

40Mercedes tries to burst Shuanghuan's tiny Bubble, gives up

Mercedes decided to sue Shuanghuan Automotive for copyright infringement for its Bubble microcar (called the Noble in China), claiming it was a copy of the smart fortwo. BMW then decided to bring its own case against Shuanghuan, citing the Shuanghuan CEO as a blatant facsimile of the BMW X5 (that's the CEO on the wall in the above picture). Mercedes got the Bubble banned from display at a couple of auto shows, BMW won its copyright infringement lawsuit in Munich, and Mercedes sued the Bubble's i

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