• Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
Ferrari is working to repair an issue with its flagship LaFerrari hypercar, but the automaker claims the problem is not as drastic as some widely-circulated rumors would have you believe.

In response to our inquiry into the matter, a Ferrari spokesperson told Autoblog that "no recall has been issued regarding the LaFerrari." Instead, the company tells us that "some clients have been invited to take their cars to an authorized service center to substitute the fuel tank with a new one with new paint." The issue seems to revolve around "a possible incorrect adhesion of a layer of paint on the fuel tank," which could result in a fire.

Contrary to rumors that suggested the issue would affect every example of the seven-figure supercar built to date and would take several weeks to repair, we're told that "the time to change the fuel tank is relatively short and the intervention concerns only a limited number of LaFerraris."

That "relatively short" time period, we're told, "takes approximately one day," and "all of the cars have already been serviced in the US." As to whether this constitutes a recall or simply a suggested service as Ferrari claims, however, is a matter that's open to interpretation.

Related Video:
First Drive: 2015 Ferrari LaFerrari


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • RECALL HELP

    Get recall details from the NHTSA and find out what to do if your car been recalled.

    From Our Partners

    You May Like
    Links by Zergnet
    Share This Photo X