Diesel enthusiasts waiting on the new Skyactiv-D-powered Mazda6 will have to wait a bit longer. The shapely fuel-efficient four-door has just had its North American launch pushed back to April, due to delays in emissions testing. Mazda had originally planned to launch the Mazda6 diesel before the end of this year, making the four- to five-month delay a rather serious one.

Mazda's senior vice president of US operations, Robert Davis, told Mazda employees in a letter obtained by Automotive News that, "final certification testing - the results of which are looking encouraging - is taking longer than we had initially expected." Following this letter, Mazda made an official announcement:

"The on-sale date for Mazda6 SKYACTIV-D clean-diesel has been moved to late-Spring 2014, to accommodate final emissions testing and certification. We are pleased with the ongoing development and are excited to launch this much-anticipated vehicle in North America. 2014 Mazda6 sales continue to exceed both our expectations and our production abilities, and supplies of the car are short at dealers across the U.S. More information on the SKYACTIV-D clean diesel Mazda6 will be available closer to the on-sale date."

Mazda is set to become the only Japanese manufacturer in the North American diesel game when the 6 arrives. The brand, which has famously eschewed hybrid technology in favor of its Skyactiv philosophy, favoring lightweight, highly efficient components in the name of saving fuel, made waves when it announced the 2.2-liter turbodiesel. In a way, the fuel-sipping powerplant takes the place of a larger V6 in the Mazda6 lineup, generating just 173 horsepower, but compensating with 310 pound-feet of torque.

The delay in certification will lead to dealers getting an additional 4,000 gas-powered Mazda6s to make up for the lack of diesel early in 2014.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 57 Comments
      Merc1
      • 1 Year Ago
      And while you're at it Mazda can we get a turbo petrol version, a Mazdaspeed 6 with about 280hp and AWD? M
      L1011
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm glad Mazda is *finally* bringing the Sky-D to the US, but why, Why, WHY did they choose to "test consumer reaction" [to diesels] by introducing it in the new 6? That is stupid, Stupid, STUPID Mazda!!! The CX-5 would have been a MUCH smarter choice. There are people, like me, who live in the snow belt, have a long commute, and need a vehicle with AWD, the practicality of a small SUV, and the torque and fantastic mileage offered by a diesel. I was practically begging Mazda in October 2012 for a Sky-D CX-5 (ditto to Subaru with the Crosstrek) but I couldn't wait any longer. VW's Golf TDI got my money.
        graphikzking
        • 1 Year Ago
        @L1011
        So you needed a small SUV and AWD and bought a car with neither? Why didn't you just go Prius then and get even better mileage with cheaper fuel and still maintain hatchback. I agree though that they need to put this into smaller SUV's. I suspect Toyota will be bringing the Camry Hybrid motor to the RAV4 very soon. It will probably get about 38mpg COMBINED and 35mpg combined in AWD format. Maybe Mazda figured that a Mazda6 diesel will net more sales than the CX5 diesel initially? I agree, it will probably net more sales because the midsize segment is so large, but the CX5 does make more fuel sense.
          L1011
          • 1 Year Ago
          @graphikzking
          Yes, because the vehicle I want doesn't exist (AWD small SUV with Diesel...forgot to mention under $30k). The Golf does not have AWD, and I really miss that feature, and it's a bit small, but it meets my needs about 80% of the time.
        icemilkcoffee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @L1011
        Agreed. The Mazda6 will face stiff competition from the TDI Passat, whereas the CX5 would face no competition. The closest competition would be the Mercedes GLK250, but that is a different price bracket.
      lad
      • 1 Year Ago
      What's the deal with diesel cars? They cost more, are more complicated than gas cars( high pressure fuel pump and injectors, exhaust filters, etc.), have a very narrow power band(poor performance) and the fuel cost 50 cents more a gallon. Are you a victim of Auto maker PR or just have shorted synapses?
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        The "deal" is: -DIesel is a "free" option, since you recoup nearly 100% of the price of the diesel cost when you go to sell your car in the used market -You get 40%+ better fuel economy than the equivalent gas engine (check Fuelly.com; the diesel Golf gets better average MPG than the Prius in the real world) -You can go 700+ miles between fill ups -The high torque means that your little ~2L diesel drives basically like a 4+L gas V8 under 5000 RPM -Diesel doesn't contain fuel-economy-robbing ethanol made FROM OUR FOOD SUPPLY like gas does -Diesel isn't explosive at ambient pressures/temperatures like gas, so it's safer in an accident and at the filling station That's the deal.
          Butch
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          Good response. Do you have a site where I can get info on gas(diesel) mileage on this mazda?
          graphikzking
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          Diesel is great for "suburban driving". That means very few stops, rolling hills, no lights etc. If you hit traffic or drive at least 25% of your time in the city, the prius will return much better average: 100 miles driven: 75 highway at 50mpg prius 25 miles at 50 mpg prius 1.5 gallons of gas used. 100 miles in a golf: 75 at hwy = 50mpg golf 25 miles at 25mpg golf 2 gallons used. That's 33% more fuel used than a prius. Which means 33% less efficient. That's if ONLY 25% of your miles are in the city. (Used just basic rounded numbers for simplicity but that is the idea)
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          graphikzking, I was looking at the Fuelly data for the Prius V, not the regular prius. My mistake (I don't even know the difference actually)
          graphikzking
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          WOW --- JUST WOW! Better mileage than the Prius - CHECK FUELLY! HERE ARE THE LINK: SUMMED UP FOR YOU: Prius 2005 - 2012 = 45 -49mpg. Golf 2005-2012 DIESEL = 38-42mpg. Diesel fuel is also ROUGHLY 10% more expensive (some places more some less but generally) which means that you are really "only" getting 34-38 mpg out of diesel AND being MUCH slower than the standard gas versions of the vehicle. GOLF: http://www.fuelly.com/car/volkswagen/golf/diesel%20l4 PRIUS: http://www.fuelly.com/car/toyota/prius Prius = Pros: less brake changes (every 100k or so at the most), less oil changes, cheaper fuel. 100% better CITY fuel economy than a Diesel Cons: Less torque (after 0 RPM), less towing capacity (basically nothing), 10 yr warranty (in most states) for the battery. Golf Diesel: Pros: More torque. Better towing for smaller things. Less loss of mpg as weight increases. Very good resale value on the cars (if you actually sell it - trading it in you get almost nothing because many dealers are crooks). Cons: more expensive fuel. Less readily available fuel. HPFP issues on many DI and Diesel cars. More expensive than gas out of pocket. Slower than gas cars with the same HP.
        Deezler
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Narrow power band? Obviously you aren't paying any attention whatsoever. They distinctly have a WIDE powerband, much wider than peaky, low displacement gasoline engines. They are indeed more complicated, hence a higher price. But this is returned in long term durability and better fuel economy. It's a personal choice, if you don't like them, you don't have to buy one.
          thequebecerinfrance
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Deezler
          @npooty Diesel are more complicated because of emissions AND the need for more power. They are now much more expensive to build.
        vizcarmb
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        I like it when you beat on dead horses
        L1011
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Premium unleaded is $0.10/gal (US) higher than diesel fuel right now where I live. The 'deal' with diesel is that I'll recover the cost of fuel over the life of the car AND in higher resale value when I go to sell it years from now. For the mileage I drive (around 22k/yr), a VW Golf TDI makes incredible economic sense. Yes, modern diesels are a bit more complicated, which is why I bought an extended warranty after carefully researching the fine print. I also buy my fuel from one vendor only, and save my receipts, just in case VW tries to blame any engine problems on bad diesel.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Translation: The vehicle does not meed emissions standards. We need to re-engineer the exhaust system.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        I love diesel, but I'm getting a bit fed up with the complexity of the emissions equipment. My wife's Touareg TDI has a urea tank, urea pump(s), urea heater, urea injector(s), particulate filter, two separate cats, and countless sensors. They keep finding bugs in the software to manage all this stuff (2 recalls so far), and the dealers don't know how to diagnose any of the codes thrown by the emissions system (they just want to tear the whole thing apart and replace each step in the urea chain....in a separate visit for each component). The urea itself is cheap, but the system is so complex even the VW-trained technicians don't have any clue how it works. If Mazda figured out a way around urea injection and/or lossy catalytic systems (the two approaches VW uses), it's a serious technological breakthrough. I hope they take their time to get it right.
          NightFlight
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          Sounds like your typical VW product. Why people defend them is completely beyond me. I am in the industry and I hear tons of horror stories....
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          Viz and Night, you missed my point. The car run flawlessly, it's just the urea system is complex and VW is still figuring out how to monitor/control it (hence the software recalls). If it stumps those German engineers that designed the car, you can imagine how the dealership grease monkeys must have trouble understanding it.
          vizcarmb
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          looks like you got yourself a lemon
      jfa1177
      • 1 Year Ago
      fingers crossed, maybe Mazda has been testing the 3 and 6 together for certification. Either way I\'m excited to see Mazda introducing a diesel here in the US.
        Greg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jfa1177
        I'm sure the 3 is a ways down on their priority list for the diesel. I'd put the CX-5 and the CX-9 ahead of the 3.
      Deneway
      • 1 Year Ago
      I want a diesel Mazda 6 WAGEN in my driving.
      Cain Gray
      • 1 Year Ago
      Fantastic, forward thinking motor. I wish it all the best.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cain Gray
        [blocked]
          Cain Gray
          • 1 Year Ago
          Wow dude. I just said it was a good motor. Does that mean I have to buy it? Who pissed in your cereal this morning?
          S.
          • 1 Year Ago
          100% in agreement! Car enthusiasts blog commenters have bigger mouths than wallets, and car companies shouldn't listen to the very vocal minority of armchair executives when mass-producing a vehicle.
      Neez
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wanted a mazda cx9 diesel more than this!!!!!!!!!!!! Come on mazda, there are already too many players in the midsize sedan market. VW gets 43mpg, and most of the others get mid 30's. If you're getting 35mpg with another midsize sedan, there is really no draw to want to get a sedan that gets say 44mpg. However, when you have a large suv that gets less than 20mpg and drop a 2.2 diesel into it so it now gets 30mpg. Now you're talking.
        Black Dyanmite
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Neez
        A diesel sedan, without VW's horrible quality, would be a much bigger player than a crossover. They're right to play to the big part of the ball park. There are plenty of diesel crossovers from Germany. Only one diesel sedan. Sorry, kid..... BD
      S
      • 1 Year Ago
      This may or may not be a rumor, but people who already own this car have reported problems of diesel fuel leaking into the oil system raising the level of the oil by way of the DPF. Sounds like they may have found a fix but the pushback is really strange to me... http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/mazda-asking-australian-diesel-owners-to-monitor-oil-levels/
        npooty
        • 1 Year Ago
        @S
        I don't think it's a rumor. I read up on the situation a while back and apparently it's actually pretty common for diesels using the filtration method to have oil dilution. I wouldn't be too concerned or let this be a deal breaker.
          Greg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @npooty
          It's dependent on how you drive the car. Those who drive it in a way that matches the function of the filter don't have problems with rising oil levels. The frequency of oil changes directly relates to your driving patterns. If you make frequent short trips, you need more frequent oil changes. If you drive long distances at a time, your oil change frequency will be normal. I haven't heard anything about increased wear-and-tear associated with fuel in the oil.
          S
          • 1 Year Ago
          @npooty
          It is common but not ideal. Oil dilution increases engine wear and in most diesel engines there is an allowable level of oil dilution. Most manufacturers acknowledge that. The off setting part about this is that if it were a common problem Mazda wouldn't take notice in such a way. Given that you read into this situation I'm certain you know about current owners of the engine needing to have oil changes at around 2-4,000 km which is quite premature, also followed by upgrades to the ecu/pcm, exhaust gas system and a new dipstick. This is a legitimate problem.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @S
        [blocked]
      manure
      • 1 Year Ago
      Until the first Accord Diesel or Mazda Diesel is delivered to final customers, the rest is PURE rumor. Auto companies are notorious for lying about diesel.
      domingorobusto
      • 1 Year Ago
      Boo. My mom is looking for a car, and I keep trying to steer her into a new 6 diesel, but I can only tell her to wait so long before she gets fed up and buys something worse. Hurry it up Mazda.
      Samuel Leung
      • 1 Year Ago
      I should have seen this coming. Mazda is promising a 2.2 diesel with 175hp, twin-turbo and 310lb/ft. All without the use of adblue injection & utilizing an Aluminum block (First for a diesel engine I believe). To the un-diesel friendly EPA and Federal emission standards, getting past all those goals is already an astounding achievement
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