Night vision has made its way into quite a few luxury cars as a night-driving safety feature, but eBay Motors wanted to see if the technology could be used to actually drive the car. Former racer and World's Faster Car Show host Justin Bell grabbed the keys to an Audi A7 and headed to Willow Springs Raceway to find out.

As if driving in the dark of the desert night wasn't hard enough, the car's windshield and side windows were blacked out, so Bell's driving relied completely on the three-inch night vision display located in the gauge cluster. In addition to navigating the track, his producers also threw in a few surprises for Bell on the track. We don't want to spoil too much for you, but based on the speeds exhibited in the video, we don't think 24-hour endurance races will be adding this tech any time soon; that being said, he probably drove the car faster and better than we could have.

Scroll down to watch how Bell does lapping the track using only the car's night vision.


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  • 16 Comments
      Peter_G
      • 1 Year Ago
      Reminds me of that scene from DayBreakers with Willem Dafoe. Honestly, Audi has their night vision screen in a much better location than BMW, which uses the iDrive screen. It just seems unnatural to look over to the center console to see what might be hiding outside if your light field. I dream of a day where they combine night vision with a projector that overlays the data in real time on your windshield like what MS and Samsung did to the wall in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=re1EatGRV0w
      DC Mike
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hey Justin, My girlfriend called... she said she wants her jacket back.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DC Mike
        [blocked]
      joeski
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yup, time I won't get back. Thanks Audi.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      ReTired
      • 1 Year Ago
      Driving quickly in "real" space would be, I think, quite difficult using a "monocular" system, without depth perception...especially for one not skilled in its use. Are one-eyed (racing) drivers common?
      Devin Baker
      • 1 Year Ago
      I read the headline as far as Justin Be-, thought it was Justin Bieber and almost threw my phone. NO! You will not take my autoblog from me!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Devin Baker
        [blocked]
      Brex
      • 1 Year Ago
      You're suggesting that Justin Bell might be able to drive faster and better than you could? Do you think so?
      tigerrace1
      • 1 Year Ago
      What does the author mean by "former" racer??
        • 1 Year Ago
        @tigerrace1
        [blocked]
      Bubba
      • 1 Year Ago
      Has NO ONE ever heard of CADILLAC ???? Who was offering night vision using HUD more than ten years ago ????? It might not have been as high res as this system, nor did it have specific pedestrian detection like the one Honda was the first to offer in 2004. But with the ability to see five times further than the head lights, and not having to take your eyes off road (thanks to HUD) it was a pretty neat system. As someone that drives a lot for business, more than my share at night and in less than nice weather, I would love to see this technology become far more wide spread. I'm not impressed by the Audi infomercial.
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