Thanks to currency fluctuations and their impact on the bottom line, a growing number of Japanese automakers are starting to increase vehicle production in the US, and it appears Subaru could be the next to do so. According to Bloomberg, Subaru is looking into expanding production capacity at its Lafayette, Indiana assembly plant, which currently builds the Outback, Legacy and Tribeca as well as the Toyota Camry.

Subaru's Indiana plant currently has an annual maximum capacity of 310,000 units, but the automaker is expecting to far exceed that figure this year, with year-to-date sales of 299,788 units through November (not including Camry) – an increase of almost 30 percent over 2011. The report indicates that Subaru could expand the plant to add as many 50,000 additional units to the plant, likely in the form of either the Forester or Impreza.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      MAX
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let's drop the pretense that Subaru is not a Toyota sock puppet or that they're "built with love".
        Justin
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MAX
        Actually it is the other way around. The co-developed BRZ was mainly developed by Subaru with Toyota letting Subaru use their base block to manufacture with. The factory that builds both Subaru vehicles and the Camry actually makes a Camry that is rated higher by JD Power than the one build by Toyota itself.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Justin
          But J.D. Power is garage and not creditable. They will say whatever for whoever pays them.
        wrxfrk16
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MAX
        They aren't. Their cars are vastly different from Toyota, they developed the BRZ and comparisons have shown it to be superior to the FR-S. They were part owned by GM and got out from under them without getting caught up in that sinking ship, they'll live with Toyota looking over their shoulder just fine.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @wrxfrk16
          [blocked]
      MAX
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Japanese don't add jobs they steal jobs from American companies and we lose the crucial white collar jobs and engineering jobs. Sometimes I think Americans are too stupid and/or greedy to have a middleclass.
        Wisdom Seeker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MAX
        America has no class structure.
        wilkegm
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MAX
        Tell that to the people who work at TTC, NRD, and Honda R&D. Subaru doesn't have enough US specific models (just one) to need a big facility here.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      It would be great if the Impreza was built in the US, I just hope that they don't over-leverage themselves in building a plant too big to be sustainable. While I think Subaru's future should be pretty secure because they build good, solid, no-nonsense, fun cars, I rather see them stay small, than trying to grow into a full-line carmaker. They are already much less quirky than they were just 5 or 10 years ago, so them trying to appeal to more mass-market consumers to sustain a larger factory, might force them to go too bland. Their partnership with Toyota in this regard, I see as a good thing (so far), because Toyota can be the bland mass-market carmaker, letting Subaru remain quirky... just that can change if Subaru ever decides (or is forced to) use common platforms with Toyota. So in the end, yes, bring the Impreza production to the US, but I just hope they can sustain their growth.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        [blocked]
        wrxfrk16
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        Indeed, it is kind of a shame to see the new Impreza in contrast to say the bugeyes of the early two thousands. Still very good cars, still have all the principles that have made Subaru the beloved brand that it is, but they definitely have lost that unique identity to an extent. In some ways, it's probably a good thing. More mainstream Impreza's and Legacy's means more revenue, which hopefully means more BRZ's and STI's and such for the enthusiast crowd. I just hope the mainstream move doesn't wind up swallowing the enthusiast options alive like what happened with Toyota over the last fifteen years or so.
          Hazdaz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @wrxfrk16
          @ piggybox You must not live in the northeast, northwest or any other place that has 4 actual seasons. Legacies, and Subaru's in general, are everywhere around these parts.
          S.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @wrxfrk16
          What unique identity - ugliness/quirkiness for the sake of being ugly? Isn't that what killed Saab? Subarus are still dead reliable, boxer engines, great awd, very safe vehicles just as they always have been. Now they just don't look as odd and will lead to greater sales, both of which seem fine by me. (My family has owned 3 Subarus)
          • 2 Years Ago
          @wrxfrk16
          [blocked]
          piggybox
          • 2 Years Ago
          @wrxfrk16
          I still rarely see Legacy on road. Mid-size sedan is such a big cake and Subaru should've gotten a bigger slice of it.
      Ae Neuman
      • 2 Years Ago
      ugly, bland, disappointing - new subaru buzzwords.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        wilkegm
        • 2 Years Ago
        Never been to East Lafayette, have you. you might displace a few cornstalks, but thats about it.
      wilkegm
      • 2 Years Ago
      Adding a model to US production is the only real way for them to meet their anticipated production increases, unless they were to start supplying Legacy's around the world. Getting a "Made with [pride/love/whathaveya] in Indiana" sticker on the Forester would put another check-mark in the pro column as our next family car. @MAX- Toyota owns 10% of FHI. That hardly makes Subaru a puppet of theirs.
        MAX
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wilkegm
        Toyota has along history of absorbing the rest of the Japanese car industry. Remember Hino and Daihatsu? That's Subaru and Mazda's future.
          NightFlight
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MAX
          @ SVX pearlie Subaru's Miata killer? You are an idiot.
          Chris Bangle
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MAX
          Toyota has a history of doing partnerships to acquire technology instead of acquiring other brands like the domestics used to or like VW. Toyota doesn't even have a member on Subaru's (FHI's) Board of Directors.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MAX
          Max, It would make sense for Toyota to absorb companies like Hino and Daihatsu because they are specialty brands. Hino only makes large trucks (Toyota does not have their own large trucks) and Daihatsu only makes kei-cars (Toyota does not have their own kei-cars). These are essentially now like brands for Toyota, much like Lexus is for luxury and Scion is for youth-oriented cars. Absorbing Subaru or Mazda would be totally different. These are direct competitors to Toyota's existing line-up. They would not benefit from buying them other than to eliminate competition and gain (inferior) technology. Hino and Daihatsu were not competitors, but specialists in segments. Toyota actually gained a line-up that did not directly compete with their pre-existing vehicles.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MAX
          [blocked]
      diffrunt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Auto building has been homogenized.
    • Load More Comments
    Share This Photo X