• Flood damaged cars sit at the Honda factory in Ayutthaya province on December 27, 2011. Japanese car assembler Honda automobile (Thailand) started to scrap 1,055 cars which were damaged by the recent floods in Thailand, ensuring that damaged parts would not be sold, the company said in statement. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Flood damaged cars sit at the Honda factory in Ayutthaya province on December 27, 2011. Japanese car assembler Honda automobile (Thailand) started to scrap 1,055 cars which were damaged by the recent floods in Thailand, ensuring that damaged parts would not be sold, the company said in statement. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • A worker talks on his mobile phone next to lines of Honda cars that were damaged by the flood before the destruction demonstration at Honda automobile plant in Ayutthaya province, central Thailand Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011. The 1,055 unit of Honda cars, mostly Brio eco-cars and City subcompacts, were destroyed in an action to assure to customers that the flood-damaged cars will not be repaired and sold. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
  • Flood damaged cars sit at the Honda factory in Ayutthaya province on December 27, 2011. Japanese car assembler Honda automobile (Thailand) started to scrap 1,055 cars which were damaged by the recent floods in Thailand, ensuring that damaged parts would not be sold, the company said in statement. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • A worker walks in front of lines of Honda cars that were damaged by the flood before the destruction demonstration at Honda automobile plant in Ayutthaya province, central Thailand Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011. The 1,055 unit of Honda cars, mostly Brio eco-cars and City subcompacts, were destroyed in an action to assure to customers that the flood-damaged cars will not be repaired and sold. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
  • Workers walk amidst Honda cars that were damaged by the flood before the destruction demonstration at Honda automobile plant in Ayutthaya province, central Thailand Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011. The 1,055 unit of Honda cars, mostly Brio eco-cars and City subcompacts, were destroyed in an action to assure to customers that the flood-damaged cars will not be repaired and sold. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
  • Honda cars that were damaged because of the flood are parked on the ground while waiting to be destroyed at a Honda automobile plant in Ayutthaya province, central Thailand Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011. The 1,055 unit of Honda cars, mostly Brio eco-cars and City subcompacts, were destroyed in an action to assure to customers that the flood-damaged cars will not be repaired and sold. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
  • TO GO WITH 'THAILAND-FLOODS-ECONOMY-BUSINESS' by Kelly Macnamara (FILES) This aerial picture shows cars submerged in floodwaters at a Honda automotive factory at an industrial estate in Ayutthaya province on November 19, 2011. Huge swathes of central Thailand were left under water for weeks when severe monsoon rains caused massive inundations, ruining crops, closing thousands of factories and swamping millions of homes. Hundreds of thousands of people were put out of work when the floodwaters swept into key industrial estates in Ayutthaya and on the outskirts of the capital Bangkok. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • This aerial picture shows cars submerged in floodswaters at a Honda automotive factory in Ayutthaya province, north of Bangkok on November 19, 2011. Thailand's worst floods in decades may gradually be subsiding but ripples will be felt by companies and consumers for months to come, analysts say, underlining the fragility of the global supply chain. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • TO GO WITH 'THAILAND-FLOODS-ECONOMY-BUSINESS' by Kelly Macnamara (FILES) This aerial picture shows cars submerged in floodwaters at a Honda automotive factory at an industrial estate in Ayutthaya province on November 19, 2011. Huge swathes of central Thailand were left under water for weeks when severe monsoon rains caused massive inundations, ruining crops, closing thousands of factories and swamping millions of homes. Hundreds of thousands of people were put out of work when the floodwaters swept into key industrial estates in Ayutthaya and on the outskirts of the capital Bangkok. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Vehicles, center, at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • Vehicles at Honda auto factory are submerged in floodwaters at the Rojana industrial district in Ayutthaya, central Thailand Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Honda's auto factory in Thailand remains closed because of the floodwaters. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
  • This aerial picture shows cars (L) submerged in floodswaters at a Honda automotive factory in Ayutthaya province, north of Bangkok on November 19, 2011. Thailand's worst floods in decades may gradually be subsiding but ripples will be felt by companies and consumers for months to come, analysts say, underlining the fragility of the global supply chain. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • A Honda worker lifts a flood damaged car at the Honda factory in Ayutthaya province on December 27, 2011. Japanese car assembler Honda automobile (Thailand) started to scrap 1,055 cars which were damaged by the recent floods in Thailand, ensuring that damaged parts would not be sold, the company said in statement. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • A Honda Jazz car hangs on a hydraulic claw before being destroyed during a destruction demonstration of the cars that were damaged because of the flood at Honda automobile plant in Ayutthaya province, central Thailand Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011. The 1,055 unit of Honda cars, mostly Brio eco-cars and City subcompacts, were destroyed in an action to assure to customers that the flood-damaged cars will not be repaired and sold. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
  • A flood damaged Honda car is destroyed at the Honda factory in Ayutthaya province on December 27, 2011. Japanese car assembler Honda automobile (Thailand) started to scrap 1,055 cars which were damaged by the recent floods in Thailand, ensuring that damaged parts would not be sold, the company said in statement. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thailand's worst flood in 50 years claimed the lives of 610 people and caused billions in damage, but with the waters slowly receding, the extent of the damage is coming into focus.

Among the tens of thousands of businesses affected by the disaster, Honda hasn't been spared – its factory in the Ayutthaya province was hit hard, and in an effort to assure that damaged vehicles never make it to consumers, the Japanese automaker has begun to scrap over 1,000 vehicles damaged during the flood.

Honda workers have begun disposing of row upon row of Brio and City subcompacts submerged during the flooding using construction equipment and vehicle crushers to demolish the 1,055 vehicles. The tragic yet oddly beautiful gallery above chronicles the aftermath and resulting destruction.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Danny Eckel
      • 3 Years Ago
      And people bitch and moan that they deserve their car at below invoice. There are costs of doing business and this is one. Although I'm sure they had some sort of insurance.
        ZOZ
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Danny Eckel
        You mean Honda did not have an insurance?!
      Javanese
      • 3 Years Ago
      What a loss, I'm sure someone can use the bodyshell for race cars.
        Gilles Thibault
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Javanese
        Some of these cars have bathed for weeks in sewer, rot and bacteria-ridden water... Would you want this in any way, shape or form in your driveway or workshop (Even if it`s to build a racecar)
      Hal Jordan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cars are the most recycled product in the world. I wonder how they recycle them by crushing them? It seems like first you'd have to remove the plastic, rubber and glass, etc. Is that how they do it?
      Brian
      • 3 Years Ago
      It really is heartbreaking to see all of those new cars ruined by the flood.
        kontroll
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Brian
        oh, let me shed some tears, oh so heartbreaking!!! ashes to ashes dust to dust, junk to junk
      rbnhd1144
      • 3 Years Ago
      Some of the posters here are sad bitter people. Honda is one of the best car makers around, that must bother some.
        DontTrustPoliticians
        • 3 Years Ago
        @rbnhd1144
        > Honda is one of the best car makers around, that must bother some. Maybe so - but even the best car makers around are no match for Mother Nature... Mother Nature 28 - Car makers 0 (1st quarter score)
      caddy-v
      • 3 Years Ago
      When I first looked at the picture I thought it was just another typical boring, bland Japanese car dealer lot.
      Sack
      • 3 Years Ago
      rbnhd1144 Some of the posters here are sad bitter people. Honda is one of the best car makers around, that must bother some." Couldn't have said it better myself.
      Flash!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Bring in some monster trucks and start charging admission!
        tmk9883
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Flash!
        That is the first thing that popped into my head as I scrolled through the pictures. Time to stop watching Monster Jam on Speed in the morning.
      jinsei888
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm noting the Honda's as of late. Personally, IMO, I won't be missing them...good riddance.
      over9000
      • 3 Years Ago
      what goes around comes around for making boring, uninspiring cars.
        sonyfan13
        • 3 Years Ago
        @over9000
        Yeah, right. As if the target demographic these cars were meant for could afford something like an Audi. You've spoken like a true snob.
      Chris Timberlake
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why can't they save some of the vehicles parts? I doubt the water has damaged the metal parts so bad they can't be refinished? The rubber tires? I get the vehicles are trashed as a whole. But why not part them out?
        Rob
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Chris Timberlake
        These cars were sitting under dirty silty water for a long period of time. The engines and electrical systems are ruined. Part them out?. the liability of premature rust is too great.
      Alluster83
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope Nat Geo or Discovery Channel make a documentary on the entire process. Will be a good fit for the TV Series "worlds toughest fixes". I would surely buy a collectors edition DVD and watch it over and over again. The 1055 vehicles lost is peanuts compared to the hundreds of thousands lost due to the plant still being offline. With an annual capacity of 300,000 Units, that's almost 1000 cars lost a day for the last 90 days alone. Automakers usually have insurance only for vehicles in transit, so hopefully Honda gets to eat the loss. The plant was completely submerged and could take several months more to resume production, that is after they replace several of the machines/robots inside. Being the only Honda car plant in Thailand, expect sales to nose dive in the coming months. They already did for Oct and November. Chevy was able to capitalize and increase market share from 1.9% to 9.1%. Honda was down 68% and Toyota down 88%. Toyota market share went from 43% to 16%!! http://www.toyota.co.th/en/sale_volum.asp?type_id=0&from_month=11&from_year=2011&to_month=11&to_year=2010&x=83&y=16
        Alluster83
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Alluster83
        Found one video..YAY!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5jHRKn1sXU&feature=relmfu
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