• Nov 17th 2011 at 4:04PM
  • 15
BYD has had its struggles in recent times but finally some good news has seen the Chinese battery and auto manufacturer get a nice little spike in its share price. The news? The powers that be in China have signaled they are still serious about pushing the adoption of electric transportation.

There are 25 cities with programs intended to boost the sales of EVs but. apparently, they are not moving forward fast enough. To encourage them to speed things up, authorities, including those at the National Development and Reform Commission, have issued a joint statement calling on those project participants to get on with the job of organizing the installation of charging points and allow EV buyers to forgo the license plate lotteries and auctions.

After shooting upwards on the news Monday and Tuesday, BYD stock has started to level off somewhat. Of course, day-to-day stock price changes aren't a great way to evaluate the overall progress of a company but dramatic shifts can be informative.

If you'd like to give BYD a hand in conquering the U.S. market, you can "Like" its Facebook page where they are accepting suggestions for a new, better name for e6 all-electric crossover.


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  • 15 Comments
      krona2k
      • 3 Years Ago
      It does make you wonder. Correct me if I'm wrong but as far as I can see from information publicly available on the internets 'all liquids' production is about the same now as it was in 2005 - yes we have had a recession and production growth since then but even with the ups and downs of the past it looks like the peak of 'cheap' oil probably did occur in 2005. I hope things haven't been left too late, it's starting to feel like the action since 2008 has mostly been smoke and mirrors and we haven't really addressed a lot of the big issues.
        SNP
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krona2k
        We cant and dont tell the world what to do. The fact of the matter is, since 2009, gas MPG on all US vehicles has gone up and will continue to go up significantly as higher tech engines come out. Look at the Direct injection, turbo boosting, higher speed transmissions, and lighter materials. 30% of ford trucks now sold run on a V6 engine and that will improve over time. GM is using direct injection in their mainstream cars, and then there's the hybrid plugin market that's growing. Also, it takes about 3-4 yrs to get a vehicle on the production line and in the market. It's been exactly 3yrs since bush left, and we'll see more benefits of that in the auto market as the years go by.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krona2k
        I believe your assessment is very accurate. The numbers don't lie. And the situation will become more difficult over time.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krona2k
        The balance between supply and demand will be met by people no longer being able to afford to drive, or at least not as many miles. The US car fleet is already shrinking, not expanding, and IMO what the industry fondly thinks of as 'normal' production levels will never be reached again. Electric cars can mitigate but not reverse this loss of mobility in the time that we have, and now out to at least 2025 they will not be able to fill the gap, as production will take time to ramp, and with the financial waste land we have created even longer for most to be able to afford. I think most will be lucky to get a NEV or an electric bike, and range anxiety will be the least of most folk's worries.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @Spec: At least in the States you will continue to have cheap power. Here in the UK we can most of us manage without cars, but we are about to have our fuel bills go through the roof. Both rising demand from China and Japan and Germany fooling around switching nuclear reactors off will lead to traded prices for coal and gas going through the roof on the international markets. I am bloody furious that we are engaging in the lunatic pursuit of installing solar at 50 degrees north. The idiots imagine that solar is in some magic way viable without sun. We are also building off-shore wind, at a 'mere' 3-4 times the cost of nuclear. Currently up to 50,000 people a year die in 'excess winter deaths'. I confidently predict that a huge hike in energy prices will make this number shoot up, and that gas and electricity prices will rise greatly over the next 3-4 years.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Damn, you make my posts seem damn optimistic. ;-)
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      it's a little curious that China hasn't moved more aggressively on electric cars since they are otherwise good at making things happen on a large scale, human lives be damned. I guess they are still thinking batteries in conventional cars are too expensive for chinese mass adoption. which is basically right. if they realized that a car can be much more efficient than they are today which means less battery is needed and that battery cost can be much much lower than it is being sold for today then they could see it is easily viable today. they would just need to 'encourage' light and aerodynamics cars and lubricate the price drop on lithium batteries. china does have the technology. DLG can make cells that are as good as A123's. and they have plenty of laptop cell makers that could reasonably get close to panasonic batteries. given how fantastically polluted Beijing is you'd think they would be better motivated.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        One of the problems China has is congestion (remember the 100 mile traffic jam that lasted for many days on end?) . . . and switching from gas cars to electric cars does nothing to solve that problem.
          skierpage
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Yes, but EV or at least hybrid addresses the horrific pollution from all those cars in traffic jams. Ban cars whose engines run at a standstill.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Many fewer people in China likely have a garage, and hence convenient charging. Petrol prices are also subsidised and a lot lower than in the US.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        What you completely fail to understand is that China doesn't want everybody in their own EV - they want the giant mass of people on mass transit. Still, when the EV cost premium gets a little smaller, we'll see EV mandates in a very big way for the major Chinese cities. China has the priority correct.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          SNP, It appear you think the Chinese have magic non-exhaustible oil wells. The Chinese don't think so, that is why they are getting to together to have a big push on EV's, and if you judge by the speed they are doing anything else it is a mystery to me why you think that they should move at a glacial pace in EV build and adoption, once the technology matures and the next oil pinch comes. As for space, you surely do not think that China is any more crowded than Japan, and that has plenty of cars, although less per capita than the US. Getting to the same rate of ownership as Japan means building several hundred million more.
          SNP
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          PS, the EV cost wont go down in any significant way. You'll see pockets of EV vehicles among the social elite and it will not go beyond that until they can find a viable power source. It will take them decades to get their plants functioning at full capacity and even then it's not enough. EVs will only hold less than 2% of the 18M car market in china even by 2020. The only way they can get more is if they begin construction on all their planned nuclear power plants and pour billions into a smart grid for the cars. (Obviously this doesnt include the heavily populated areas where most people dont even have space for an apt let alone a parking space)
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        I like the scare quotes around 'encourage.'. In countries like China...well...that word has a bit higher of an imperative. I also found the hidden 'light weight and aerodynamic...'. :) We would be all disappointed if it wasn't there...
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Such statements by Beijing government departments, carry little authority inside the PRC. This sort of statement is propaganda for the world press, and most PRC officials understand it's little more than that. In fact, local officials must always interpret Beijing government policies, through the prism of CCP confidential 'guidance' communiques, and 'suggestions'. It's curious that PRC motorists have no sense of patriotic pride in the local automotive industry. Even more interesting is the the greater respect for the brand if managed as an ROC JVC! In contrast, ROC, (Taiwan) car buyers take a real pride in locally assembled and produced motor vehicles. BYD, is seen by Beijing as a vehicle with export potential, so it receives more support than other purely local manufacturers.
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