• Sep 14, 2011
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Just as Bentley publically unveils its new Continental GTC at the Frankfurt Motor Show, the company has announced sales figures for the first eight months of 2011. Things are looking good for the British automaker, with an increase of 31 percent compared to this time last year with more than 4,000 cars sold worldwide. The United States, Bentley's largest market, accounted for more than a quarter of the cars delivered, with sales up 36 percent. The largest increases, however, came in Germany and China, where sales are up by two-thirds. Bentley's sales in China exceeded 1,000 for the first time in the brand's history.

Bentley's impressive 2011 may come during a weakened world economy, but the company's rebound is a product of a mostly new line-up. The all-new Mulsanne and the significantly refreshed Continental GT both hit showroom floors for the first time this year. The Continental GTC convertible should also help Bentley continue its strong sales into next year. Follow the jump to read the complete press release from Bentley and be on the lookout for a live photos of the Continental GTC from Frankfurt very soon.
Show full PR text
(Frankfurt, Germany. 12 September 2011). The world premiere of the new Continental GTC convertible at the International Automobile Exhibition (IAA) in Frankfurt comes as Bentley's sales rebound across the globe. Despite recent economic uncertainty, sales increased year-on-year in major markets, demonstrating the incredible interest in the new Bentley model range. With the new GTC convertible set to go on sale in the last quarter, Bentley expects to deliver an overall sales increase of around 40 per cent for 2011.

For the year to August, Bentley sales increased by 31 per cent with 4016 cars delivered to customers worldwide. For the first time ever, over a thousand Bentleys were sold in the Chinese region – a remarkable increase of 67 per cent year-to-date - with this milestone achieved before the end of August. However, it is not just China that is showing renewed vigour. Bentley's biggest single market remains the US and with sales of 1195 cars to the end of August across the entire Americas region, the brand is up by 36 per cent on 2010. Europe too is showing increased confidence, up 35 per cent overall and led by a resurgent Germany where Bentley sales are up by two-thirds.

Leading this growth is strong demand for the Continental GT coupe. Just under half of all Bentley sales are GTs as it reached all markets for the first time in August. Mulsanne too has a strong order bank and, with the arrival soon of the new Continental GTC convertible, there is a solid foundation for future growth expectations.

Speaking on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show, Bentley Motors' Chairman and Chief Executive, Wolfgang Dürheimer, said:

"It is an incredibly exciting time for Bentley. We have a strong new model line-up driving an increasing global interest in the Brand. The new Continental GTC, which we officially reveal tomorrow, has already been previewed to some customers and their response has been extremely positive. With this, and other new models still in the pipeline, I am confident we can sustain this strong sales performance."

Taking cues from its GT coupe sibling launched last year, the new Continental GTC builds on the highly successful foundation of the previous cabriolet, which premiered in 2006. The new convertible delivers a more contemporary and muscular style, with increased performance and an ever-greater array of modern technology. Yet the hallmarks of Bentley remain; the power and performance matched to the luxury, quality and bespoke craftsmanship that can only be Bentley.

The new Bentley Continental GTC can be seen on the Bentley stand in Hall 3 of the Frankfurt IAA, with a press conference on Tuesday 13th September at 12:30pm. It is available to order now with first customer deliveries beginning in late 2011.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      waetherman
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another sign that there is a widening gap between the haves and the have-nots; a global recession that results in most folks being unable to afford the home they live in, while the uberrich have cars that cost as much as houses, paid for with our tax dollars. Love the car, hate the driver. Eat the rich.
        Dvanos
        • 3 Years Ago
        @waetherman
        Well put waetherman, yesterday on CNN they talked about the poverty rate climbing. And the GOP still refuses to raise taxes on the rich.
          Evan McMiller
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dvanos
          So that's your solution? Just take everyone's money? Is that seriously your problem to end poverty? Just take money away from those who have it (and do their best to create economic growth) just to make them feel it more? Or something? I was never really sure what the point of this argument even was, as it's about the stupidest thing I've ever heard.
        RudyH
        • 3 Years Ago
        @waetherman
        Exactly my thoughts 'Rich get richer, the poor poorer'
        Evan McMiller
        • 3 Years Ago
        @waetherman
        What are you smoking...you hippies love to drag on the rich because you aren't...here's some news. The only "rich" that make money off our tax dollars are the lazy bums in congress whose salary you pay. The global gap has nothing to do with what's happening here in the US, let's keep it focused. FYI, the biggest gaps are in socialist countries. Just thought you should know. Anyway, the rich have nothing to do with the poor being poor. I know it's hard for you to understand, because you clearly have taken no kind of economics class of any kind, but there is not a fixed amount of money in the world. The rich getting richer does not hurt the poor, it helps them. They have more money to buy more things which creates more demand which creates more jobs. It's not too hard to figure out. When you're done whining about made up facts try reading a little Smith, Friedman, hell even Keynes would steer you away from this.
          waetherman
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Evan McMiller
          "It's a zero sum game, somebody wins, somebody loses. Money itself isn't lost or made, it's simply transferred from one perception to another. " - Gordon Gekko In case you haven't had to file in a few years, let me remind you that the richer you are, the less percentage of your income you pay in taxes. That's because there are these loopholes that the rich can take advantage of; deductions, credits, lower rates on certain kinds of income, carry-over losses, and that sort of thing. In effect the tax rate is one number and every deduction is a "credit" offered by the American people to the wealthy so that they can do something other than pay their taxes with that money. That's money that should be going to fund schools, roads, education, courts, support for seniors, domestic security and supporting our troops (the combination of which is the vast majority of of what government expenditures go towards). Instead, the less a person makes (and the less advantage a person gets from those services) the more a person pays for them. And the more benefit a person gets, the less they pay. I'm not saying that there shouldn't be Bentleys, or that there shouldn't be people who can afford Bentleys. What I am saying is that this country shouldn't subsidize people so that they can buy Bentleys on the misguided notion that somehow watching other people drive Bentleys benefits us. The rich just need to pay their fair share of the costs of doing business in this country. If they have enough left over at the end to buy a Bentley, all the better for them. You're completely deluded if you think that becoming rich helps others; that's a rehash of the tired (and debunked) trickle down theory. The best economies are the ones where everyone can benefit, not just a limited few, and where the societal costs are evenly carried by those who benefit from them. Right now, a very few hoard the vast majority of the wealth, they spend it on ridiculously expensive things, made by a very small, generally low-paid population. It would be a much healthier economy if there were more of a middle class who could afford more; the middle and lower classes spend far more of their income on products and services than the super rich, so a tax system that put more money in the hands of the middle and lower classes would create far more jobs than allowing the wealth to concentrate in the hands of a small minority of people. That's econ 101, Evan. Let me know when you're ready for 201, which is presumably when you're done being a sophomoric blowhard with specious arguments.
          FoxJ30
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Evan McMiller
          Actually, demand side economics involves the poor getting richer (and into the middle class) rather than the rich getting richer (and therefore making more jobs/supplies of goods available). If one wealthy family were to spend $1000 on a meal, that stimulates jobs at 1 restaurant. If 20 middle class families were to spend $50 each for meals, that stimulates 20 different restaurants. In one scenario, a rich guy pays a rich chef and a waiter, in another scenario 20 line cooks and 20 waiters at Applebees all get a little bit. Multiply this through by millions of $1000 distributions, and you can see how middle class tax cuts help many more people than tax cuts to the rich. Now, try as they might to slim it down, the government still needs money, even if only for basic infrastructure, so there still needs to be a certain amount of tax inflow. Would it make more sense to take it from someone who can afford $1000/month or lots of people who can only afford $50/month? I'm not gonna lie, by most measures I'm on the better side of middle class (ridiculous NYC rent prevents me from being much more). Would I like my taxes lowered? Who wouldn't? Do I need my taxes lowered? No, not really. If me skipping a steak dinner and a couple nights out a month means that a couple of families at the other end of the scale can keep a little more of their earnings, I think that's a sacrifice I can make. And if I can make that sacrifice, people splurging on Bentleys can make a bit of a sacrifice, too. Btw, I saw 4 Bentley's in one afternoon last weekend (2 Continental GTCs, 1 Flying Spur, 1 Arnage)... so at least in the Palisades, there's no lack of German/British metal.. and that's discounting the Rolls, Astons, and Lotuses that frequent the area...
        The Great Unknown
        • 3 Years Ago
        @waetherman
        Maybe the rich are tired of investing in a hostile business environment.
      stclair5211
      • 3 Years Ago
      Proof! Obama has fixed the economy. Thank you Mr.President! Hope and change delivered!!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      David Donovan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can't say I'm surprised by this. Last week I was heading up the NJ Turnpike and saw 2 Bentley Continental GT hard tops and 1 Continental GTC.