Plug your ears and keep your eyes glued to the screen. What we present here is rare footage of a Tesla Model S and a Tesla Roadster side-by-side on a picturesque, chicane-filled road. The music, in typical Tesla fashion, drowns out any automotive noise, including the wondrous whirring that emanates from these magnificent machines as they whiz on down the road.

So, here's what we'd suggest: plug your ears and imagine those sounds echoing off the nearby hills as the Roadster and Model S strut their electric stuff. Realize, too, that these electric machines are pricey and that the cost of owning one, at least for most of us, is beyond reach. At least the video if free (if, perhaps, not yet supposed to be viewable, says Green Car Reports). Hit the jump to check out the dreamy duo of Teslas in their side-by-side brilliance out on the open road.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 46 Comments
      Ekow Mensah
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is one sweet Electric Jag....
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      The 300 mile EV is here. :) And it does a 5 second 0-60!! The price may be prohibitive, but i think it's safe to say that the EV has arrived. The reason is that the Panasonic cells in this car are brand new tech, just released. Like any cutting edge product, they are going to be $$$ for a while. The better news is that Panasonic actually has more improvements to those cells in the pipeline. Eventually the cost of the cells used in the Model S will go down in price and trickle down to cheaper EVs.
        soundbargaming
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Well said. You have to start somewhere. People don't seem to understand that. If we ever want to get to flying cars, we have to get past abominations like the Terrafugia. The Model S is gorgeous and a true leap forward in EVs.
        Grendal
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Somewhere I heard that the 300 mile version is using upgraded cells. Their skateboard battery pack is really impressive. I'm hoping a smaller pack will be put in a low price city car in another 3 to 5 years.
      X
      • 3 Years Ago
      I cannot get over the Model-S bravo to the designer. One of the best looking cars.
      Zack TST
      • 3 Years Ago
      I believe that chicane-filled road is the Horse Thief track at Willow Springs. I agree with 2 wheeled, the EV that I can actually celebrate and be proud of is here. There's hope for a fun, yet ecologically friendly, future.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      AngeloD
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why is it a good use of our tax money to subsidize the purchase the sports cars for the wealthy, to the tune of a $5000 rebate check from the US Government to everyone who buys one of these toys?
        Durishin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        Because your (foolish American) government promulgates the lie that electric cars will free you from foreign oil and give you a cleaner environment. Never mind that the energy to charge the car must be generated somehow using fuel from somewhere.
          John Smith
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Durishin
          At worst, the electricity comes from American coal. It's possible that the electricity comes from American nuclear power. At best, it's from from American renewable power sources - American wind farms, tide generators, or solar. And at the very best, it's from your very own solar panel on the roof of your house. So yes, electric cars WILL lessen our dependence on foreign oil.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Durishin
          [blocked]
          mrpinto
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Durishin
          You're wrong for a few reasons: First reason: Gas-powered cars can only be powered by gas. The electricity powering an electric car can be generated in many ways, some clean and some not. Perhaps most will come from coal now but future sources could be far cleaner things like geothermal, nuclear (fission or even fusion someday), hydroelectric, etc. Electric power means that a few plants need to be changed instead of millions of cars. Second reason: Even if the power companies burn coal or whatever, it's STILL better. Larger plants are more efficient than the smaller plants (aka Internal Combustion Engines) that live in each car. Less energy is be wasted in heat and noise. Gearing isn't an issue. It's easier to scrub pollutants at a plant than it is to install scrubbers after the catalytic converter in each car, etc. Electricity is just a better medium than gas - more flexible, more efficient. Unfortunately, the batteries are heavy as hell. Maybe hydrogen gas (stripped from water at a plant using... electricity) would be better, maybe not. But gas is basically only available from one incredibly limited and inflexible source that's not really in US control...
        John Smith
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        Idea: Only subsidize purchases of electric vehicles < $25,000, and require the purchaser to pay the tax credit BACK if they sell the car within 3 years. This accomplishes several things: 1) It promotes development and sales of *inexpensive* electric cars to people who could actually benefit from the subsidy - working class people who commute to their jobs and would otherwise drive gasoline cars. People who are shopping $50,000+ electric cars are cross-shopping them against luxury gasoline cars, and there's no benefit to making luxury cars any cheaper. 2) It prevents unscrupulous dealers from buying the cars themselves, claiming the tax rebate, then reselling the cars as "used". When I bought my house in 2009, I got a tax rebate.. the rebate is contingent on me staying in the house for 3 years. If I sell the house before then, I have to pay back the rebate. So, it's isn't something new that hasn't been done before - it has, and the car title transfer can easily be tracked. If title for a car that received the tax credit changes, the previous owner receives a tax bill.
          DrEvil
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John Smith
          What you said sort of makes sense, but.... 95% of americans would have nothing to do with any of the current generation hybrids or electric cars. Think of this as a flagship for the electric car industry. Just like GM uses the prowess of the Corvette to sell lesser Chevrolets, this car would make folks who wouldn't even consider and of the current ordinary and often odd-looking hybrids and electrics that are out there today.
        Grendal
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        The US Government susidizes lots of stuff: oil companies, corn farmers, existing car companies, etc... A small subsidy that goes directly back into the hands of a taxpayer should be applauded. Besides - it's just a tax break. It's money that was taken out of the taxpayer's paycheck not free money given away. The tax break applied to those that purchased the Nissan Leaf as well. At $32,500, it's hardly a rich persons toy.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        [blocked]
      Azazel
      • 3 Years Ago
      "So, here's what we'd suggest: plug your ears and imagine those sounds echoing off the nearby hills as the Roadster and Model S strut their electric" I just turned on my vacuum while watching the video. Same basic sound.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Azazel
        [blocked]
      Cakeflour
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Realize, too, that these electric machines are pricey and that the cost of owning one, at least for most of us, is beyond reach." Um, I thought the Model S was going to be priced at ~$50,000, which isn't THAT unobtainable.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Dana Cebi
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love Tesla, unlike all the horrid Nissan Leafs; these cars performance, luxury and looks are well inline for their price tag. In time if things go well enough even the batteries will be made in state, considering how the job market is here it technically should be cheaper to make lithium packs here than Japan, Korea, Taiwan or Europe... Heck evven the Chinese are nightmarish corner cutting a holes to deal with. The so called cost advantage of made in china is a dying myth in every market that was dead long before people were in a panic over increasing labor cost there. I do not know why anyone deals with them outside of the small electronics industry where they do in fact have an experience edge. The things wrong with America that destroyed its labor is corporate greed that hit the manufacturing, healthcare, housing and education industry hardest. Union greed is a pathetically small problem next to the bigger problem of being amoral and complacent from the top. So yeah even in this trite way Tesla=Win because their cars are desirable, well made and for me Californian made. This sad bloated pathetic excuse of a state had a company worthy of being proud of, their deals with the government are practically angelic considering what most USA scumbag corporations get out of the government in this country.
      Durishin
      • 3 Years Ago
      So, we have known for some time that Lotus provided the sports car sans drivetrain. Are we to surmise now that Jaguar has provided the saloon chassis?
        Grendal
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Durishin
        The chassis is made at the old NUMMI plant in the Bay Area. The Model S will be exclusively made by Tesla with very little outside sourcing (except the batteries). The skateboard battery pack will also be made at the plant.
      Jonathan Brown
      • 3 Years Ago
      Looks awesome!
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