There's plenty of room to get lost in the Volkswagen Group. In addition to the VW brand, the group controls Skoda, Seat, Audi, Porsche, Lamborghini, Bentley and Bugatti. But we can't forget its truck divisions. In addition to being Europe's largest automaker, VW is also one of its largest producer of trucks as well, producing VW commercial vehicles while holding nearly three-quarters of the shares in Swedish truckmaker Scania and a significant stake in MAN as well.

That's last bit's about to increase, though, as a new deal in progress will see Volkswagen increase its holdings in MAN SE from 30.5 percent to 55.9 percent. According to Bloomberg, the deal is still pending regulatory approval, but is expected to lead to increased cooperation between Scania and MAN, helping both companies reduce overhead.

The latest move in Volkswagen Group chairman Ferdinand Piëch's expansion plan, the takeover will make the German industrial giant that much bigger. Both Volvo (which also produces Mack and Renault trucks) and Daimler (which owns Freightliner, Mitsubishi Fuso, Thomas, Sterling and Mercedes-Benz trucks), each hold about 21 percent of the European truck market. But because MAN and Scania together account for some 30 percent of European heavy-duty truck sales, the acquisition is expected to catapult VW into position as the largest truckmaker in Europe.


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  • 22 Comments
      Myself
      • 3 Years Ago
      eine volk eine reich eine car maker... one would be tempted to say that the WWII ended in 2008 and Germany won... They own most of UK infrasrtucture, iconic car makers and even Her Majesty's Royal Train....
        Jac Zobel de Ayala
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Myself
        Not to mention that ethnic Germans rule the modeling world. German-Brazilians (such as Giselle Bunchen) disproportionately account for Brazil's most popular international models. Majority of models in the US come from the Midwest area, where German-Americans can be mostly found. Then there's Heidi Klum and there were two Germans on the 6 most powerful models during Linda Evangelista's time. Not only do they make the best industrial stuff, they are apparently the best looking people on the planet as well. There is no justice in this world!
      jonwil2002
      • 3 Years Ago
      Not just trucks but buses as well. Scania and MAN are fairly big in the production of buses and bus chassis. As are Mercedes and Volvo. Wonder what the numbers will look like in the bus market if this deal goes through.
      throwback
      • 3 Years Ago
      I (like most kids growing up) loved/love big rigs. In particular I like the look of these Man trucks. As for VW's attempt to own every brand on the continent, I have my doubts that they can effectively keep from cannabilizing each other. However, I do think this is a good buy as long as governments allow trucks to deliver goods using petroleum engines.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      avinash Machado
      • 3 Years Ago
      Germany is bent on world dominion.
      • 3 Years Ago
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        ThinkAboutIt
        • 3 Years Ago
        The design difference is really more a matter of freight packaging. Cabovers basically trade ride for trailer capacity. Governments mandate maximum lengths for tractor-trailer rigs, and cabovers allow for extra-length trailers. That's a big deal in Europe, where limits are tight. US rules allow for most trailer lengths and conventional/longnose trucks, and long-haulers cover long trips in wide-open spaces, so conventional cab trucks are popular here.
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