• Jul 7th 2011 at 3:57PM
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Mitsubishi i – Click above for high-res image gallery

Mitsubishi is nearly ready to join North America's nascent all-electric parade. The 2012 Mitsubishi i will be available sometime early next year, and the automotive world has been speculating on the type of electron-powered economy one can expect to achieve when behind the wheel. The speculators can take a break because the EPA has finally released its ratings for the i.

How does a mile per gallon equivalent of 126 city and 99 highway sound? That's a combined MPGe rating of 112. The EPA also subjected the 2012 i to its LA4 driving test, also known as the city test. This subjects the vehicle to numerous starts and stops, as one would encounter when cruising through town. The electric four-door achieved a max cycle range of 98 miles.

From an efficiency standpoint, the 2012 Mitsubishi i stacks up nicely against its electricity-drinking competition. The Tesla Roadster 2.5 has a 119 MPGe combined rating while the Nissan Leaf sports a rating of 99 MPGe combined.

Check out our photos of the Mitsubishi i in the gallery below, and be sure to keep reading for the full press release.


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[Source: Mitsubishi | Images: Copyright 2011 Jeff Glucker / AOL]
Show full PR text
All-New 100% Electric-Powered Mitsubishi i Earns Impressive EPA Rated 62 Mile/98 Mile LA4 Mode Range and 112 MPGe Rating
Jul 7, 2011


CYPRESS, Calif., July 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc., (MMNA) has seen its all-new Mitsubishi i battery-powered electric vehicle rated to deliver a best-in-segment "fuel" efficiency as determined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the areas of both mile-per-gallon equivalency (MPGe) and driving range.

The 100% electric-powered Mitsubishi i has earned an EPA-rated 126 MPGe in city driving and 99 MPGe out on the highway (112 MPGe combined). Additionally, the EPA has also awarded the stylish and fun-to-drive electric vehicle (EV) a "real world" driving range of 62 miles. The "real world" EPA driving evaluation incorporates battery-sapping segments of aggressive driving and operating the vehicle in higher ambient temperatures with the air conditioning on.

Additionally, the EPA has rated the vehicle's LA4 driving cycle range at 98 miles. The EPA LA4 driving cycle test covers a distance of approximately 7.5 miles and includes numerous brief stops along the route to mimic in-town driving and its accompanying start/stops for traffic signals. Mitsubishi has worked to improve the driving range of the 2012 Mitsubishi i: The 98 mile range is attributed to software upgrades and a revamped regenerative braking system.

"We feel that with the combination of capability, affordability, and high level of efficiency offered by the 2012 Mitsubishi i will prove very appealing to consumers considering EV transportation," said Yoichi Yokozawa, President and CEO of Mitsubishi Motors North America.

With a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $27,990 for the base ES model before a federal tax credit of $7,500 and various state financial incentives (subject to availability of funding), the Mitsubishi i is the most affordably-priced mass-produced electric vehicle available in the United States.

Among the vehicle's long list of standard amenities are an energy-efficient electric air conditioning with micron filter, speed-sensitive Electric Power Steering (EPS), driver seat heater and LED rear combination tail lamps. Advanced safety features including dual-stage supplemental front air bags, driver and front passenger seat-mounted side impact supplemental air bags, roof-mounted curtain side-impact supplemental air bags for front and rear-seat outboard passengers, Active Stability Control (ASC) with Traction Control Logic (TCL), 4-wheel Anti-Lock Braking system (ABS) with Electronic Brake force Distribution (EBD), Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), high voltage cut-off system and an Approaching Vehicle Audible System (AVAS) are also included on every Mitsubishi i model as standard equipment.

Log on to i.MitsubishiCars.com for more information and to learn how to pre-order this groundbreaking energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly new vehicle from one of Japan's leading auto manufacturers.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 4 Years Ago
      I knew it was going to be quite a bit more efficient than the leaf. The JDM car is something like 2400lbs and quite small. Not sure about the USDM model but i am sure it is under 2700lbs. That's a big advantage in efficiency and explains why this car gets good mileage despite having only 66% of the battery of the Nissan Leaf. With the rear wheel drive setup, i would love to put a performance suspension on this sucker and shunt mod the controller for more amps.. My only complaint is the exterior, but i can live with it. At the right price, i would love to own one of these..
        GoodCheer
        • 4 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        I got to test drive one of these at the EDTA conference this spring. It's actually got a lot more grunt that you would expect looking at it. Far from enough to spin the tires though (they have a lot of weight on them).
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 4 Years Ago
          @GoodCheer
          Cool! I missed the window of opportunity to drive it myself. I'm glad the power doesn't disappoint. I stand by my statement of it needing more amps to get it into tire spinning territory ;) Dave R: Think about it, 13% more efficient in a gas car is a big deal. That's like the difference between getting 30mpg in and 34mpg. I think the efficiency gain is higher though, maybe more like 15% or more. Would be interesting to see real world tests tho. Smaller battery = faster charging though since the limitation is the power that the grid can put out.
        Dave R
        • 4 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Well, I'd hardly consider 13% more efficient ground breaking, but expected thanks to the i-MiEV's lighter weight and smaller frontal area... Regardless, this is probably the first real competitor to the LEAF in the US.
      P
      • 4 Years Ago
      It may seem insignificant but this is, finally, the first EV nearly anyone can afford. Sure, most people could use it only 6 out of 7 days of the week but, for those of us whose households have another car, the reality of an EV in our everyday lives is upon us. Odd as it may be, this is a very important car.
      emperor koku
      • 4 Years Ago
      Nice to see some competition in the electric car market on the way!
        Dave R
        • 4 Years Ago
        @emperor koku
        Yeah - it's $6k less than the LEAF and will likely have an EPA range of 55-60 miles (compared to the LEAF's 73) - but man - that $6k price difference is a game changer! $28k - $7.5k = $21.5k - add in a couple thousand for state rebates ($2.5k for CA, for example) and now it's down to $18k. Impressive. Get some CHAdeMO quick charge stations strategically located in various places and this will make a better and more cost effective city car for most than the LEAF.
          fairfireman21
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          Everyone says you will get the $7500 tax break, but you only get it if you have 7500 dollars in deductions. Remember that cash for clunkers program when the government gave you so much for gas guzzlers? Then at tax time that money they gave you was considered income so you paid taxes on it.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          Yeah, the price IS a big deal. It makes this car affordable to more people. If you can afford a Prius or a mid-size sedan, you can afford this car. The Leaf and Volt are more like buying new BMWs in terms of price.
      Bryan Lund
      • 4 Years Ago
      You can order these cars w/o graphics, man. In fact, I have my eye on a purple-metallic one right now. I like this car, I drive a 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS that has the EVO look going on and is very sporty. If I don't buy one of these I will buy a 2013 Mitsubishi Lancer Hybrid GTS. I could go either way right now. But these graphics on this i are not required reading, people. They're optional.
      Bryan Lund
      • 4 Years Ago
      I saw this video on the net where this UK guy had an i for about a year as a "test drive for a year" vehicle, offered to him by Mitsubishi as a tester. Well, the guy loved the car so much he didn't want to give it back to them. He loved the car! It was smooth driving it, quiet and efficient. I'm getting rather excited about buying an i of my own, heck, I might even get some kind of loyalty discount in my i because I currently drive a '08 Lancer GTS, I don't know, I'll have to find that out.
      Ernie Dunbar
      • 4 Years Ago
      I find it interesting that the Tesla is still the most efficient. Part of the reason for that is weight I'm sure, but the fact is that it's basically an electric Corvette. Electric cars simply don't work remotely like gas cars do - the larger the motor, the *more* efficient it is, typically. This is very much not a paradigm we consumers are used to. I can't wait to see what the future holds for production electrics.
      Edge
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can't believe they are going to call the car 'i'. I guess they wanted a name, to reflect the size of the car. Let's see, I have a choice between the i or the Leaf. One looks like a "real" car, and the other like an EV. Hmmm? It's a cool car, but I don't see this competing very well with the Leaf. Come on Mitsubishi, you can do much better than that.
        throwback
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Edge
        The car has always been called the i. The EV version was named i-meiv.
      Jessica
      • 4 Years Ago
      I definitely think this car is a good competitor for the Nissan Leaf... there needs to be more diversity in the electric car market and I'm glad Mitsubishi has something to offer... at a much more affordable price than the Leaf.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jessica
        Much more affordable? The Mitsu i is exactly $4k cheaper than my Leaf. Sure I agree that every dollar counts, but these are still two very different vehicles that just happen to share the same propulsion type. I've driven the Japan spec Misu iMiEV and wasn't impressed the same way I was with the Nissan LEAF. I have better hopes for the U.S. spec version, but $4k is kinda a small gap given the huge quality difference between the LEAF and Japan spec iMiEV.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jessica
        I'm just glad that Mitsubishi has anything to market. That company has no idea how to sell a car in the US.
        emperor koku
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jessica
        I'm sure Ford will come in higher than this but I'm interested to see how it stacks up relative to the Leaf.
      Neil Blanchard
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm glad they have lowered the price, and that they have a choice of battery pack capacities. Too bad it isn't front wheel drive, for better regen. And the "peeled back" graphics make it seem thin skinned and makes it appear cheap. They need better (or no!) graphics. Neil
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Can you imagine buying a car where they force the marketing graphics on you? I don't think so. You'll have customers staying away.
      PeekOyle
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's still too expensive
        P
        • 4 Years Ago
        @PeekOyle
        If $21k is too expensive for you (and potentially a lot less with your State's credits), I'm going to venture that you're out of work. Sorry. This is a fantastic value for what is, for many people, a week-day commuter. What else can you get for $21k that is anywhere near as efficient.
        P
        • 4 Years Ago
        @PeekOyle
        If $21k is too expensive for you (and potentially a lot less with your State's credits), I'm going to venture that you're out of work. Sorry. This is a fantastic value for what is, for many people, a week-day commuter. What else can you get for $21k that is anywhere near as efficient.
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