• Jul 7, 2010
Chrysler has introduced musclebound V8 engines carrying the Hemi moniker twice over the last fifty years, and the company is reportedly preparing to once again back away from the Hemi. As we discovered during our First Drive of the 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee, the burly, modern engine with a throwback name won't be going away so much as it will be re-framed when the marketing-speak starts to flow. Dodge vehicles and Ram trucks will unbashedly carry the Hemi, and it will continue to be available in some Jeeps and the Chrysler 300, though it will be downplayed as merely a "5.7-liter V8" in those brands.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the Hemi's Multi-Displacement System will also be given more prominence to point up the engine's fuel-saving abilities. With the Pentastar V6 finally putting a fully competitive V6 in the Chrysler engine stable, and a desire by management to cultivate a more refine and efficient image, it seems that the iconic powerplant will move to the back seat for now. The Hemi is one of the best V8s out there, just like the original, and for now, it's still available.

[Source: The Wall Street Journal]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago

      "HEMI power for the whole Sphere"
      registered trademark of richmurp.nospam

      just in case.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's probably the same as the whole Chevrolet/Chevy debacle. They will call it a 5.7L V8 while normal people will just call it a Hemi.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I doubt that the Hemi will completely disappear.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Long live the Hemi!!!
      • 4 Years Ago
      The imagery conjured up when someone says Hemi, only belongs with Dodge. Chrysler can still use it, just call it something else... firepower, perhaps?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Don't get me wrong, Chrysler's V8 is a great engine, but I never got why "Hemi" was such a key sales pitch since 99% of the cars on the road today have hemispherical combustion chambers. It might have been novel in the 60s among domestic manufacturers, but even then there were several furrin' cars that had that feature and didn't make a big deal about it.

        • 4 Years Ago
        The "HEMI" like most of todays engines doesn't have a true hemispherical combustion chamber at all. Some will have to or more hemi chambers siamesed together with some quench areas and other feature to promote turbulence and mixing the fuel and air.

        Personally I preferred the 4.7 SOHC v8s from Chrysler of the "HEMI"
      • 4 Years Ago
      To attract the greenies, just change one letter: from Hemi, to Hemp.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Its called the Eagle V8.

      .. But its still a Hemi in Dodge cars and Rams.
      • 4 Years Ago
      When the new CAFE comes into full force at 2016, you can kiss affordable hi performance cars goodbye (at least for the time being). I predict another performance drought similar to when the industry struggled in the mid 70's-mid 80's with the new EPA regulations. Once manufacturers can get the economy numbers up again, performance will come back again.
        • 4 Years Ago
        johnmsp -

        A few points.

        1) High tech materials (e.g. carbon fiber, boron steel) are not 'affordable' and also not desirable from a service standpoint. They will never deeply penetrate the market to dramatically alter weight. As raw material prices continue to climb, you can't automatically assume prices will just get cheaper as they did in the past.

        2) You can compare car bodies from 1960 to 1990 but not 1990 to 2010. There has been a huge increase in the amount of safety regulations in the past decade that have driven up body weight considerably. Some weight can be trimmed via high tech materials but it's limited due to cost.

        3) As cars have lost weight with higher strength steels, the weight has just been added right back in to meet customer demands (power option everything, electronic infotainment, and so on).
        • 4 Years Ago
        HIGH CLIMBER

        The Chinese will find a way to make carbon fiber on the cheap...or some other material that's light and strong.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You're totally wrong. It'll be crappy for a couple years, but then it'll be a rebirth of SMALL, LIGHTWEIGHT, FUN TO DRIVE CARS. You know, like we had all over the place in the late 80s to late 90s. Now everything is fat, and even boring family sedans have 280hp because they weigh so freakin' much. I'm looking forward to the plethora of fantastically efficient yet still fast and amazingly fun to drive vehicles that will be coming, instead of the GIGANTIC 300hp lardass crap we have to choose from today. I am seriously not interested in ANY new cars these days. They're all way too fat.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Those CAFE regulations can reversed by the next administration. We will have to see what happens. I'm sick of cheaper interiors to save weight.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @High Climber

        I disagree. I think there will be new materials used like carbon fiber. If you look at history a compact car in the 1960s (chevy nova) weighed as much as a compact car in the 1990s (Civic Si).

        That is including a lighter weight metal and more safety equipment on the newer car. I think in the future cars will contain lighter weight plastics.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ gruv:

        There will never be lightweight cars like ca. 80's - 90's again. The safety requirements are much more stringent now and have forced the weight up. Not to mention all the creature comforts and electronics now on current vehicles (that customers have come to expect).

        Unless there are high performance hybrids or EV's, the current IC technology will not be able to deliver similar performance levels now (in 2010) and still meet the new CAFE at 2016+.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @HighClimber

        Overtime hightech materials become low tech materials as the manufacturing process is refined and becomes more common place. Within decades our vehicles will be largely made with carbon materials.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Materials like CF probably won't become cheap because it's a bunch of glued woven strands... you have to weave and glue it no matter what, that takes much more effort than pressing a piece of steel. And you definitely don't want to be in a car made out of cheap Chinese CF... that will snap from closing the door too hard.
        Now I'm not denying that some amazing composite will be created in the future, that will be cheap to manufacture and have better properties than steel... but until absolutely nothing can be done to advance cars using steel, or steel becomes more expensive than researching a new composite... things will remain where they are. Lambos and Uber-Vettes will be made out of the good stuff, while Corollas and Sonatas will be made out of whatever they are made from right now.
        • 4 Years Ago
        First of all, the CAFE restrictions are not as stringent as you might originally think
        http://www.ridelust.com/much-needed-chill-pill-the-truth-about-2016-cafe-standards/

        And secondly, by 2016 there is absolutely no reason not to believe that direct injection/ turbo chargers/ cylinder deactivation/ hybrid powertrains can't maintain or increase power while increasing efficiency in moderately priced cars.

        2011 mustang - 30mpg hwy, 300+hp, 3500lbs, starts at $22,000

        The tech is there, automakers just need the motivation to use it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Never say never, of course cars will become lighter - they need to be. Right now we're driving around in 4,000 lb sedans burning 300-hp engines just to get around. Why does a family sedan need to be the size of a football field? North America is the only place this is so common - most other countries realize you don't need 5 spare seats at all times 'just in case'. Lightweight material will become cheaper as it becomes more common (simple supply/demand) and modern engineering and electronics will replace old, heavy mechanical components. Look at the weight of an old V8, typically coming in at 700 lbs, where the same power can be had from a modern turbo-4 or V6 weighing half as much.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Two Words:

        Hyundai Veloster.
        • 4 Years Ago
        So it's going to be 70's/80's all over again, big V8's with only 135 horsepower tuned for gas mileage, and smaller cars but uninspiring styling and very little power. Get 'em while you can, I'm going out and buying me a 5.0L Mustang with 412 hp before the horsepower war ends.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yep things were looking up at Chrysler tell I read this arcticle. What a way to rain down on mopar spirit :(
      • 4 Years Ago
      Buy your high HP cars now and they tell your kids and grandkids about the wild ride you owned during the performance car era of the early 2000s. Because in 20 years everything will be 50 hp running on batterys and carrot juice.
        • 4 Years Ago
        carrot juice diesel and electric motors.. 50hp but 1000 pounds of torque at 3 rpm
      • 4 Years Ago
      Keep the hemi!
      Hemi V6. 4.8 liter 400hp.
    • Load More Comments