• Sep 14, 2009
Steenstra Styletto – Click above for high-res image gallery

Watch out Tesla – there's another California-based zero-emissions sports car company in the works: Steenstra GCM. Founded by designer and auto industry consultant Cornelis Steenstra, the Styletto isn't just about creating a guilt-free car, but one meant to compete with the Ferraris and Lamborghinis at the top of the heap. And, judging by the images in our gallery below, we're guessing it'll do battle with the Italians with a whole heap of batteries onboard.

Steenstra hasn't released any information on the car yet, but it is being billed as "the first 200-mph-plus super sports car to be built in California." If all goes well and the company can get its financial legs, the Styletto will be formally introduced at the 2010 Pebble Beach Concourse d' Elegance and you'll be able to buy one in 2013. For now, you can read about it in the press release after the jump.



[Source: Steenstra]


PRESS RELEASE:

FIRST AMERICAN 200 MPH PLUS ZERO EMISSION SUPER SPORTS CAR TO BE BUILT IN CALIFORNIA

MISSION VIEJO, CA Sep 7, 2009: Renowned international car designer Cornelis Steenstra has just released the first images of his latest project, a zero emission super sports car called STYLETTO. This first American zero-emission super car offers a low slung, extremely aerodynamic body, gull-wing type doors and ample seating to properly accommodate 2 occupants in a space not normally found in these types of exotics.

Steenstra earned his stripes as designer at Volvo, Mercedes-Benz, and Mazda's European Studios, and was Strategic Design Manager Europe for Hyundai/Kia in Germany, before starting his independent consultancy Foresee Car Design, Inc., in California. Aside from his normal consultancy work for Porsche in Germany, Steenstra also executed a myriad of projects for OEM companies like Nissan, Hyundai/Kia, MG-Rover, Peugeot and Fisker, and was involved with several start-up companies, including several "clean vehicle technology" companies.

Combining all this experience, Steenstra teamed up with a group of very experienced automotive industry professionals, and set out to develop a new range of vehicles that would represent the best in American automotive engineering and technology. This range of vehicles, of which the STYLETTO is the first, are targeting the exclusive sports car market currently dominated by Ferrari, Lamborghini and Porsche, with passionate offerings that excel in design, engineering, build quality and are environmentally responsible, producing zero emissions.

"I grew up with a passion for transportation and motor racing, and have always felt that people should and could enjoy driving passionate performance automobiles while still retaining their responsibility toward the environment. These are desires that can very well be enjoyed together" says Steenstra.

Steenstra and his team are currently in negotiations with several investment firms for this ambitious venture, and are aiming to have drivable prototypes of the STYLETTO ready in time for the 2010 Pebble Beach Concourse d' Elegance. Limited series production of this first offering is scheduled to start in March 2013.

Steenstra GCM, founded in 2009 by Foresee Ltd, is a privately owned American company producing high-end zero mission performance automobiles. Situated in Mission Viejo, California, Steenstra GCM is headed by Cornelis Steenstra as Chief Executive Officer, Robert Bruns as Chief Financial Officer, Hans-Peter Hemmer as Vice President of Engineering and Mario Greco as Vice President of Chassis Development.

Foresee Car Design, Inc., Founded in 2001, is a privately owned American independent design consultancy based in Mission Viejo, California. Founded by Cornelis Steenstra, Foresee Car Design, Inc. has executed projects for Porsche, Nissan, Hyundai/Kia, Subaru, MG Rover, Peugeot, Icon Aircraft, DAF Trucks, Scania, Terex, Honda, Suzuki, Beijing Auto and many more.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Mistyped I guess. Target price is $159,900.
      • 5 Years Ago
      About the size: I am 6'4" tall and not exactly a light-weight, I admit, and I have always disliked the fact that I never fit in these gorgeous Italian Super Cars, so one of the perimeters for this project is that I should fit in it with comfort. We are using a 100 percentile mannequin instead of the 95 percentile used commonly, and the 50 percentile used in Italian sports cars. I fit.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Really?...well, you might want to check your engineering and ergonomics again; your 100th percentile oscar's heels are sitting higher than his butt...and are in the space where your steering components are going to need to be.
      • 5 Years Ago
      A new breed of domestic American auto manufacturers emerging.
      • 5 Years Ago
      You are not exactly right on zero emissions. It's the green fallicy. Someone somewhere has to supply the power to juice up the batteries. With voltage resistance and transmission costs to get from the generating station to your car, you have in essence burned more fuel than you would have if you just put 98 octane in the thing and fired it up. You may be guilt free but you're still guilty. It's like eating a juicy filet mignon. You don't have to see the cow get bonked on the head but it still had to happen. Logic dictates "dead cow is to filet as huge carbon footprint is to charged battery." So with batteries in my future, where will I find the Ferrari purr?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Speaking of fallacies, you've got the number one: since you have to have SOME emissions you are worse than what we have now.
        An electric car can be 100% green (if powered by renewable, green sources, which is possible) or not. But even in the worst case, with a car that's powered by old coal plants, emissions are about half of what they are in the best, greenest and cleanest engine today. Why? Because an electric car is about 95% efficient. Electricity transportation and charging is about 80%. And generation is about 60% (with coal). So in the end you have about 50% efficiency. The best car you might find is around 25% when new and at optimal regime (in typical usage a new, efficient car is around 15% efficient).
        So now explain me in what universe 50% worst case efficiency is "worse" than 25% best case efficiency.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Meh, another superbuck supercar that may or not be built. Not bad looking though. I like the greenhouse graphics. The front end graphics look a bit Alfa-ish to me. Not a bad thing, jus' sayin'...
      • 5 Years Ago
      About the design - beauty is very much in the eye of the beholder, of course, but I do admit that I was far more impressed with the concept cars in the 70's than I am of the so-called super cars these days. On top of that, we have to design keeping in mind that the car has to look "new" when it comes out, in this case in 2013, which is why we normally keep things under wraps until then.

      The only reason why we are showing this now, is since this is the initial guise of the car, desplays the trail of thought, but is by no means the final version. Creating some press about it now helps us define the customer group clearly, it provides valuable global feedback, as in here, and hopefully creates enough buzz to draw our investors over the line.

      On the near-zero-emissions aspect: We fully realize this, of course, but firstly advertizing it as near-zero-emissions doesn't sound half as punchy. Secondly we are working on optimizing this until introduction and then some, since we ultimately want to be a zero emission car company, but given the option we have, this is the best available now. It is also much easier to convert only a few electricity producing facilities to the latest cleaner and possibly zero emissions status then it is to comvert millions if not billions of individual cars, so the likelihood of change coming from the top down is much higher.

      On the pricing: That is a necessity, forced on by the need to be profitable and not become yet another Chrysler or GM, where we offer products we loose money on, and then ask for a Government/taxpayer bail out since we did not expect to loose money.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The design does, somehow, look a bit dated...rather like what someone in the 1990's would think a supercar of today would look like.
      • 5 Years Ago
      While I'm supportive of any startup that wants to build supercars, I gotta say this design isn't particularly encouraging. Parked next to the Enzo it looks a generation older, unfortunate when the tech it promises underneath is very au-currant.

      The split line down the middle of the body in particular was last done on the F50 Ferrari, from 1997. The F430 had a hardline bisecting the body, but it was done through surfacing, not panel breaks.

      I'd like to see the crisp roofline surface change inform the fenders, instead of the fairly generic form they take currently.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I have always been frustrated that my 6'4" never fits in to a desirable super sports car, neither any Italian nor the Lotus Esprit at that time, an old Jaguar E-Type. All are made for tiny jockey figures, which makes sense if you just want the cars to race, but these days people are generally bigger.

      That is why this car is packaged in such a way that even I fit in it properly and in comfort. We used a 100 percentile mannequin instead of the usual 95 percentile, and completely ignored the jockey sized 50 percentile mannequin.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Is it just me or does this smell of total vaporware? I've seen more credible designs from students; the driver doesn't even fit. Drivable prototype next year?...yea right. This is nothing, but wishful thinking designed to milk some foolish investors.
      • 5 Years Ago
      About the design - beauty is very much in the eye of the beholder, of course, but I do admit that I was far more impressed with the concept cars in the 70's than I am of the so-called super cars these days. On top of that, we have to design keeping in mind that the car has to look "new" when it comes out, in this case in 2013, which is why we normally keep things under wraps until then.

      The only reason why we are showing this now, is since this is the initial guise of the car, desplays the trail of thought, but is by no means the final version. Creating some press about it now helps us define the customer group clearly, it provides valuable global feedback, as in here, and hopefully creates enough buzz to draw our investors over the line.

      On the near-zero-emissions aspect: We fully realize this, of course, but firstly advertizing it as near-zero-emissions doesn't sound half as punchy. Secondly we are working on optimizing this until introduction and then some, since we ultimately want to be a zero emission car company, but given the option we have, this is the best available now. It is also much easier to convert only a few electricity producing facilities to the latest cleaner and possibly zero emissions status then it is to comvert millions if not billions of individual cars, so the likelihood of change coming from the top down is much higher.

      On the pricing: That is a necessity, forced on by the need to be profitable and not become yet another Chrysler or GM, where we offer products we loose money on, and then ask for a Government/taxpayer bail out since we did not expect to loose money.
        • 5 Years Ago
        What is the use of publication if you don't want to listen to what people have to say? These days the Internet provides an excellent opportunity for interaction, and who are we to stick our heads in the sand. Of course you can't please everyone, but we are not targetting everyone either.

        Bedankt. We werken er erg hard aan dit tot een succes te maken.
      jafuoafuoa
      • 5 Years Ago
      hlsdugfos6
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