2023 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

2023 C-Class Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
8.5

The new C-Class is a superb luxury sedan with a decadent interior, fabulous and showy tech, proper handling and mini S-Class styling cues. It's one of the best compact sedans money can buy.

Industry
8
Pros: Classy styling; tech powerhouse; ultra-smooth powertrains Cons: Learning curve to all that tech; on the expensive side The 2023 Mercedes-Benz C-Class is as well-rounded as it gets for a compact luxury sedan. Mercedes’ lineup of C-Class variants may not be as wide-ranging as it was before the 2022 redesign, but the C is still going to appeal to most folks searching for a bit of luxury. S-Class-inspired tech and design always elevates the C-Class, and the similarities are unmistakable once again with this generation. The massive MBUX infotainment system and wide array of optional tech features may be a bit overwhelming at first, but nobody offers as much futuristic tech as Mercedes does. Both the exterior and interior design are simple but decidedly upscale with, once again, tech playing at the forefront. Driving the C-Class leaves no mistake that it’s one of the best luxury sedans money can buy. The ride and handling balance of the C 300 toes the line between sumptuous and sporty, just the way we’d expect from an entry-level model in this class. It’s not the sportiest amongst its competitors — the BMW 3 Series is still better to drive — but any enthusiast will find joy in the way it comports itself on the road. Per usual when it comes to Mercedes-Benz products, the C-Class finds its home at the top of the class in most areas, and assuming you can afford one, we highly recommend it. Interior & Technology   |   Passenger & Cargo Space   |   Performance & Fuel Economy What it's like to drive   |   Pricing & Trim Levels   |   Crash Ratings & Safety Features   What's new for 2023? Mercedes adds the AMG C 43 variant to the lineup for 2023 (seen in the gallery directly above). We haven’t driven the mid-tier AMG model as of this story’s publishing, but it’s going to add a potent dose of performance to the otherwise one-horse C-Class lineup. No changes for the C 300 model are outlined as of now. What are the C-Class’ interior and in-car technology like? The C-Class borrows heavily (to its advantage) from the recently redesigned S-Class. Generously bolstered seats integrate pivoting headrests on single posts, with a range of interior colors and treatments — a racy red-and-black combo, or brick-like AMG Sienna Brown with natural wood pinstriped with real aluminum. Ambient lighting decorates the doors, dash and aircraft-inspired metal vents with a choice of 64 colors. Architects would dig the cantilevered armrests and “floating,” light-rimmed door-control housings. A three-spoke steering wheel looks as good as it feels, as do bright-metal paddle shifters as cool and polished as river stones. The 11.9-inch MBUX infotainment system, despite the improvements gleaned from the bigger screen, still requires a first-time learning curve. But once your steering-wheel thumbs and brain are trained, MBUX really is a nifty — and undeniably eye-popping — way of navigating today’s data-heavy automotive landscape. The option of adopting the new “Zero Layer” home screen design first seen on the EQS smartly avoids digging into distracting …
Full Review
Pros: Classy styling; tech powerhouse; ultra-smooth powertrains Cons: Learning curve to all that tech; on the expensive side The 2023 Mercedes-Benz C-Class is as well-rounded as it gets for a compact luxury sedan. Mercedes’ lineup of C-Class variants may not be as wide-ranging as it was before the 2022 redesign, but the C is still going to appeal to most folks searching for a bit of luxury. S-Class-inspired tech and design always elevates the C-Class, and the similarities are unmistakable once again with this generation. The massive MBUX infotainment system and wide array of optional tech features may be a bit overwhelming at first, but nobody offers as much futuristic tech as Mercedes does. Both the exterior and interior design are simple but decidedly upscale with, once again, tech playing at the forefront. Driving the C-Class leaves no mistake that it’s one of the best luxury sedans money can buy. The ride and handling balance of the C 300 toes the line between sumptuous and sporty, just the way we’d expect from an entry-level model in this class. It’s not the sportiest amongst its competitors — the BMW 3 Series is still better to drive — but any enthusiast will find joy in the way it comports itself on the road. Per usual when it comes to Mercedes-Benz products, the C-Class finds its home at the top of the class in most areas, and assuming you can afford one, we highly recommend it. Interior & Technology   |   Passenger & Cargo Space   |   Performance & Fuel Economy What it's like to drive   |   Pricing & Trim Levels   |   Crash Ratings & Safety Features   What's new for 2023? Mercedes adds the AMG C 43 variant to the lineup for 2023 (seen in the gallery directly above). We haven’t driven the mid-tier AMG model as of this story’s publishing, but it’s going to add a potent dose of performance to the otherwise one-horse C-Class lineup. No changes for the C 300 model are outlined as of now. What are the C-Class’ interior and in-car technology like? The C-Class borrows heavily (to its advantage) from the recently redesigned S-Class. Generously bolstered seats integrate pivoting headrests on single posts, with a range of interior colors and treatments — a racy red-and-black combo, or brick-like AMG Sienna Brown with natural wood pinstriped with real aluminum. Ambient lighting decorates the doors, dash and aircraft-inspired metal vents with a choice of 64 colors. Architects would dig the cantilevered armrests and “floating,” light-rimmed door-control housings. A three-spoke steering wheel looks as good as it feels, as do bright-metal paddle shifters as cool and polished as river stones. The 11.9-inch MBUX infotainment system, despite the improvements gleaned from the bigger screen, still requires a first-time learning curve. But once your steering-wheel thumbs and brain are trained, MBUX really is a nifty — and undeniably eye-popping — way of navigating today’s data-heavy automotive landscape. The option of adopting the new “Zero Layer” home screen design first seen on the EQS smartly avoids digging into distracting …
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Retail Price

$44,850 - $59,250 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
Engine , 2.0L I-4
MPG Up to 25 city / 36 highway
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 9-spd auto w/OD
Power 255 @ 5800 rpm
Drivetrain 4MATIC all wheel, rear-wheel
Curb Weight 3,583 - 3,979 lbs
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