2021 Dodge Challenger

2021 Challenger Photos
The Energizer Bunny's got nothing on the Dodge Challenger. It just keeps going and going and going without a major redesign, turning the calendar over each year with new colors (this year it's Gold Rush!) and trickling down elements from top-dog performance models to lesser versions to create new variants (hello R/T Scat Pack Shaker Widebody!). The end result is a 2021 Dodge Challenger that is both hopelessly out of date, yet still one of the coolest cars on the road. Maybe it's because it's so honest – it's OK being an old-school muscle car, not a modern sport coupe. Maybe it's because it doesn't take itself so seriously with all those bold colors like Hellraisin and Sinamon Stick. Maybe it's because people like huge fenders, scoops poking out of the hood and, oh yes, a 717-horsepower supercharged V8 screaming away while the tires roast. So yes, the Challenger is awesome and we dig it. We also must recognize that it is hopelessly out of date, with a platform that dates back to either the late 2000s or the late 1990s depending on how you want to look at it. The only significant changes occurred for 2015 with slight styling tweaks and a new interior, meaning its mid-cycle refresh happened longer ago than the entire lifespans of most car generations. As a result, that once-new interior is now quite old, the Challenger's safety credentials aren't great, the engines are incredibly powerful but crude and inefficient, and if you're interested in handling, it's probably best to stick with a Mustang or Camaro. Basically, you're buying a brand-new old car … and that's not necessarily a bad thing. What's new for 2021? The Widebody package makes its way down to the R/T Scat Pack Shaker and T/A 392, bringing the number of Challenger variants to 17. Maybe? Seriously, it's really hard to keep them straight. Anyway, to the glorious array of colors already available on the Challenger comes Gold Rush for 2021. What's the Challenger interior and in-car technology like? The Challenger's interior certainly isn't as characterful and flamboyant as its exterior would suggest. The Mustang and Camaro are more interesting and distinctive inside. Still, there are some interesting design flourishes that spruce things up, from the base trim's standard houndstooth cloth to the two-tone leather choices available as options. Besides, we're not sure how flamboyant you need the interior to be in a car available in gold, orange and purple paint colors. Furthermore, what the Challenger interior may lack in visual pizzazz, it makes up for with space (see below) and technology. A 7-inch touchscreen is standard, but all trim levels have an 8.4-inch version available as an option or standard. Both are among the easiest to use in the industry, and we prefer the 8.4-inch unit in particular to what's offered by the Camaro and Mustang. Heck, the Ford doesn't even come standard with a touchscreen, let alone the Apple CarPlay and Android Auto that are included on every Challenger. …
Full Review
The Energizer Bunny's got nothing on the Dodge Challenger. It just keeps going and going and going without a major redesign, turning the calendar over each year with new colors (this year it's Gold Rush!) and trickling down elements from top-dog performance models to lesser versions to create new variants (hello R/T Scat Pack Shaker Widebody!). The end result is a 2021 Dodge Challenger that is both hopelessly out of date, yet still one of the coolest cars on the road. Maybe it's because it's so honest – it's OK being an old-school muscle car, not a modern sport coupe. Maybe it's because it doesn't take itself so seriously with all those bold colors like Hellraisin and Sinamon Stick. Maybe it's because people like huge fenders, scoops poking out of the hood and, oh yes, a 717-horsepower supercharged V8 screaming away while the tires roast. So yes, the Challenger is awesome and we dig it. We also must recognize that it is hopelessly out of date, with a platform that dates back to either the late 2000s or the late 1990s depending on how you want to look at it. The only significant changes occurred for 2015 with slight styling tweaks and a new interior, meaning its mid-cycle refresh happened longer ago than the entire lifespans of most car generations. As a result, that once-new interior is now quite old, the Challenger's safety credentials aren't great, the engines are incredibly powerful but crude and inefficient, and if you're interested in handling, it's probably best to stick with a Mustang or Camaro. Basically, you're buying a brand-new old car … and that's not necessarily a bad thing. What's new for 2021? The Widebody package makes its way down to the R/T Scat Pack Shaker and T/A 392, bringing the number of Challenger variants to 17. Maybe? Seriously, it's really hard to keep them straight. Anyway, to the glorious array of colors already available on the Challenger comes Gold Rush for 2021. What's the Challenger interior and in-car technology like? The Challenger's interior certainly isn't as characterful and flamboyant as its exterior would suggest. The Mustang and Camaro are more interesting and distinctive inside. Still, there are some interesting design flourishes that spruce things up, from the base trim's standard houndstooth cloth to the two-tone leather choices available as options. Besides, we're not sure how flamboyant you need the interior to be in a car available in gold, orange and purple paint colors. Furthermore, what the Challenger interior may lack in visual pizzazz, it makes up for with space (see below) and technology. A 7-inch touchscreen is standard, but all trim levels have an 8.4-inch version available as an option or standard. Both are among the easiest to use in the industry, and we prefer the 8.4-inch unit in particular to what's offered by the Camaro and Mustang. Heck, the Ford doesn't even come standard with a touchscreen, let alone the Apple CarPlay and Android Auto that are included on every Challenger. …
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Retail Price

$29,065 - $59,765 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$169 - $639 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 3.6L V-6
MPG 19 City / 30 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd w/OD
Power 303 @ 6350 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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