2020 Chevrolet Blazer

2020 Blazer Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
7

This crossover benefits from distinctive looks in certain trims, but isn’t for everybody. The driving experience is above average, but does not match the performance aspirations.

Industry
7.5
The 2020 Chevrolet Blazer enters its second year of resurrection with a new engine option. It’s a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, and it just so happens to be under the hood of our 3LT tester. This new mill produces 230 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque, slotting below the 308-hp V6 and above the naturally aspirated 2.5-liter four-cylinder. The turbo is mated to a nine-speed automatic transmission, and comes as the standard motor for 2LT and 3LT trims. When paired with all-wheel drive, it’s the most efficient Blazer engine choice, coming in at 23 mpg combined versus the V6’s 21 mpg combined rating. The EPA ratings are exactly the same as the front-drive-only 2.5-liter four-cylinder, too (21/27/23). With front-wheel drive, the 2.0-liter-turbo-equipped Blazer posts 24 mpg combined. Besides the engine, changes for 2020 are minimal. We appreciate the ability to now turn off the start-stop system, although it wasn’t a particularly jarring experience before. We’re driving the 3LT, which comes with a number of niceties as standard equipment. All the seats are covered in perforated leather, and the front seats are heated. It also comes with a smattering of safety systems: rear cross traffic alert, blind-spot monitoring and rear park assist. However, it didn’t have adaptive cruise control or lane-keeping assist. Finally, the 3LT comes with a power liftgate. This trim starts at $40,195, but our car came with a single option: the $1,400 Sound and Technology package includes the rear camera mirror, a 4.2-inch digital screen in the instrument cluster, navigation and additional power/USB outlets. That leaves us with a final price of $41,595. Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I think the Blazer is one of the better-looking crossovers in this segment. This is not the boxy Blazer of old — rather it’s a stylish, vaguely Camaro-like family hauler inline with contemporary tastes. I prefer the linear characteristics of the available 308-hp V6, but the 3LT tester's 2.0-liter four-cylinder is pretty enjoyable. It has a lot of low-end torque (258 lb-ft at 1,500 rpm) and a peppier dynamic than you usually get in a mainstream grocery-getter. I found the nine-speed transmission works well with both powerplants. The chassis is borderline taut, more so than other crossovers of this size, which I like, and the Blazer is among the best handlers in its class. I’m not sure everyone is looking for that, but props to Chevy for trying to create an identity.  That neatly sums up my take on the Blazer: It has an identity. The design might sway some swing buyers. It’s interesting, which speaks to how Chevy and its take on crossovers have evolved. Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: When the Blazer first launched I hated it. I hated the way it looked inside and out. I hated that it was unnecessary. And I hated that it debased the Blazer name. Over time, especially after seeing it in more colors out in the wild, I got used to its looks. I wasn’t big on this one’s white-leaning Silver Ice Metallic …
Full Review
The 2020 Chevrolet Blazer enters its second year of resurrection with a new engine option. It’s a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, and it just so happens to be under the hood of our 3LT tester. This new mill produces 230 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque, slotting below the 308-hp V6 and above the naturally aspirated 2.5-liter four-cylinder. The turbo is mated to a nine-speed automatic transmission, and comes as the standard motor for 2LT and 3LT trims. When paired with all-wheel drive, it’s the most efficient Blazer engine choice, coming in at 23 mpg combined versus the V6’s 21 mpg combined rating. The EPA ratings are exactly the same as the front-drive-only 2.5-liter four-cylinder, too (21/27/23). With front-wheel drive, the 2.0-liter-turbo-equipped Blazer posts 24 mpg combined. Besides the engine, changes for 2020 are minimal. We appreciate the ability to now turn off the start-stop system, although it wasn’t a particularly jarring experience before. We’re driving the 3LT, which comes with a number of niceties as standard equipment. All the seats are covered in perforated leather, and the front seats are heated. It also comes with a smattering of safety systems: rear cross traffic alert, blind-spot monitoring and rear park assist. However, it didn’t have adaptive cruise control or lane-keeping assist. Finally, the 3LT comes with a power liftgate. This trim starts at $40,195, but our car came with a single option: the $1,400 Sound and Technology package includes the rear camera mirror, a 4.2-inch digital screen in the instrument cluster, navigation and additional power/USB outlets. That leaves us with a final price of $41,595. Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I think the Blazer is one of the better-looking crossovers in this segment. This is not the boxy Blazer of old — rather it’s a stylish, vaguely Camaro-like family hauler inline with contemporary tastes. I prefer the linear characteristics of the available 308-hp V6, but the 3LT tester's 2.0-liter four-cylinder is pretty enjoyable. It has a lot of low-end torque (258 lb-ft at 1,500 rpm) and a peppier dynamic than you usually get in a mainstream grocery-getter. I found the nine-speed transmission works well with both powerplants. The chassis is borderline taut, more so than other crossovers of this size, which I like, and the Blazer is among the best handlers in its class. I’m not sure everyone is looking for that, but props to Chevy for trying to create an identity.  That neatly sums up my take on the Blazer: It has an identity. The design might sway some swing buyers. It’s interesting, which speaks to how Chevy and its take on crossovers have evolved. Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: When the Blazer first launched I hated it. I hated the way it looked inside and out. I hated that it was unnecessary. And I hated that it debased the Blazer name. Over time, especially after seeing it in more colors out in the wild, I got used to its looks. I wasn’t big on this one’s white-leaning Silver Ice Metallic …
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Retail Price

$28,800 - $45,600 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$592 - $2,150 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
See Local Pricing
Engine 2.5L I-4
MPG 21 City / 27 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 9-spd w/OD
Power 193 @ 6300 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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