CS 2dr Rear-wheel Drive Coupe
2019 BMW M4

2019 M4 Photos
BMW felt it needed a ‘tweener car in the M4 lineup as this generation closes in on its lifecycle. The M4 GTS served as the ultimate track car, while the M4 Competition was only slightly warmer than the regular M4. This M4 CS ended up being the car made to find the middle, and it looks spectacular. BMW snagged the rear diffuser and taillights from the GTS, then added an exposed carbon fiber gurney flap and front splitter to boot. The heavily sculpted hood makes the front end an intimidating sight to behold, and it’s hiding a little something extra underneath. There’s an additional 10 horsepower and 36 pound-feet of torque on tap over top of the M4 Competition, bringing the total to 454 horses and 442 pound-feet from BMW’s 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged inline-six. The only transmission available is the seven-speed dual-clutch, shifting its way to 60 mph in just 3.9 seconds. No suspension changes were made compared to the M4 Competition, but you do get a more aggressive wheel and tire package. Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires wrap 19-inch wheels up front and 20-inch rollers in rear. Many compromises have been made throughout the car in the pursuit of reducing weight — it weighs 65 pounds less than an M4 Competition with the dual-clutch transmission. You get lightweight door panels made of compacted natural fibers, pull straps for door handles and you also lose the center armrest. However, the rear seats stay in. Both the hood and roof are made of carbon fiber to drop even more poundage. All this costs plenty more than a regular M4, with our tester coming in at $112,795 after options. Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: We try to pick one element of the car we’re testing when writing Drivers’ Notes. For me, the entirety of the M4 stood out. All of the elements work together to create a sports coupe that looks and feels special. The steering, the inline six engine, the tight suspension — everything is in place. They aren’t all perfect, and some things, like this CS edition, are not worth the money, in my opinion. I’ll let my colleagues dissect them. But taken as a whole, the M4 is very good. The M2 is purer, but the M4 feels right-sized for most circumstances not involving a track. I had a good time in my night in the M4. That’s the idea.  [slideshow id='2174819'] Assistant Editor Zac Palmer: Loving the BMW M4 CS from the exterior is an easy thing to do. I know I was instantly won over as I walked up to the San Marino Blue CS sitting in the Autoblog garage. BMW doesn’t hide what this car is about. The bulging hood, low carbon fiber splitter and gold brake calipers hovering over carbon ceramic brake discs make sure of that. I’m less convinced upon stepping into the cabin, though. Porsche-like door strap pulls replace actual door handles. “Compacted natural fibers” replace actual pieces of trim. They’ve gone and ripped the …
Full Review
BMW felt it needed a ‘tweener car in the M4 lineup as this generation closes in on its lifecycle. The M4 GTS served as the ultimate track car, while the M4 Competition was only slightly warmer than the regular M4. This M4 CS ended up being the car made to find the middle, and it looks spectacular. BMW snagged the rear diffuser and taillights from the GTS, then added an exposed carbon fiber gurney flap and front splitter to boot. The heavily sculpted hood makes the front end an intimidating sight to behold, and it’s hiding a little something extra underneath. There’s an additional 10 horsepower and 36 pound-feet of torque on tap over top of the M4 Competition, bringing the total to 454 horses and 442 pound-feet from BMW’s 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged inline-six. The only transmission available is the seven-speed dual-clutch, shifting its way to 60 mph in just 3.9 seconds. No suspension changes were made compared to the M4 Competition, but you do get a more aggressive wheel and tire package. Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires wrap 19-inch wheels up front and 20-inch rollers in rear. Many compromises have been made throughout the car in the pursuit of reducing weight — it weighs 65 pounds less than an M4 Competition with the dual-clutch transmission. You get lightweight door panels made of compacted natural fibers, pull straps for door handles and you also lose the center armrest. However, the rear seats stay in. Both the hood and roof are made of carbon fiber to drop even more poundage. All this costs plenty more than a regular M4, with our tester coming in at $112,795 after options. Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: We try to pick one element of the car we’re testing when writing Drivers’ Notes. For me, the entirety of the M4 stood out. All of the elements work together to create a sports coupe that looks and feels special. The steering, the inline six engine, the tight suspension — everything is in place. They aren’t all perfect, and some things, like this CS edition, are not worth the money, in my opinion. I’ll let my colleagues dissect them. But taken as a whole, the M4 is very good. The M2 is purer, but the M4 feels right-sized for most circumstances not involving a track. I had a good time in my night in the M4. That’s the idea.  [slideshow id='2174819'] Assistant Editor Zac Palmer: Loving the BMW M4 CS from the exterior is an easy thing to do. I know I was instantly won over as I walked up to the San Marino Blue CS sitting in the Autoblog garage. BMW doesn’t hide what this car is about. The bulging hood, low carbon fiber splitter and gold brake calipers hovering over carbon ceramic brake discs make sure of that. I’m less convinced upon stepping into the cabin, though. Porsche-like door strap pulls replace actual door handles. “Compacted natural fibers” replace actual pieces of trim. They’ve gone and ripped the …
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Retail Price

$103,100 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 3.0L I-6
MPG 17 City / 23 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 7-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 454 @ 6250 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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