1LS 2dr Coupe
2017 Chevrolet Camaro

MSRP ?

$25,905
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings ?

$2,606
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EngineEngine 2.0LI-4
MPGMPG 20 City / 30 Hwy
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2017 Camaro Overview

When you think of places you'd want to take the 650-horsepower Chevrolet Camaro ZL1, what comes to mind? Perhaps a drag strip, where you could verify Chevrolet's claimed 3.5-second 0–60-mph and 11.4-second quarter-mile times? Maybe a road course such as Willow Springs, where we first drove the hardtop. How about 500 miles of relentlessly straight interstate? Well, as you may have guessed, one of these is not like the others, and it happened to be the choice of Chevrolet. To try out the current range-topping Camaro's droptop iteration, Chevy organized a road trip from Charlotte, North Carolina, down to Daytona, Florida, in time for the 500. Which is great, but we only had a single day to make the 500-mile trip before the cars were shipped out. That meant we didn't really have time to, in the words of Chevrolet's marketing department, "find new roads." However, this relatively dull route did give us an opportunity to experience another aspect of the Camaro ZL1: what it's like to live with in the real world. Before we get too deep into driving impressions, we should cover what's different between the coupe and the convertible. First and foremost is that, unsurprisingly, the convertible weighs more. The droptop has about an extra 200 pounds of weight thanks to the standard chassis reinforcements found on every other convertible in the Camaro lineup plus the top mechanism itself. The convertible has a different rear wing, too. It uses the unit on the standard SS. One of the key reasons for this is that the SS wing has an embedded antenna, which is necessary since there was no good place on the soft top to install an antenna. The convertible also loses the coupe's fancy electronically controlled limited-slip differential. Instead it makes do with a mechanical unit. Finally, the suspension has been slightly re-tuned for the extra weight, and the Performance Data Recorder is not available. Though the option is nice, this is an understandable omission, since not many convertible owners take their cars to the track. The rest of the package matches the coupe. The front fenders are the wide versions to accommodate the 285-mm front tires stopped by six-piston Brembo brakes. The back has 305s and four-piston calipers. And most important, the same 650-horsepower, 650-pound-foot supercharged LT4 V8 is under the hood. Put simply, that engine is a hoot and two halves. It's ready at any moment to belt you up on-ramps and across intersections as fast as you dare. The noise it makes is excellent, too, and it's not entirely uncivilized. In the quietest setting, which is the default for the Touring drive mode and selectable in the infotainment menus, the exhaust is kept quiet, with just a bit of burble reaching your ears, as well as a faint whine from the supercharger. Crank up the revs and that mellow rumbling turns into a hearty, eager bark that overpowers any other nearby sound. It isn't deafening, but will certainly announce your presence to anyone …
Full Review

2017 Camaro Overview

When you think of places you'd want to take the 650-horsepower Chevrolet Camaro ZL1, what comes to mind? Perhaps a drag strip, where you could verify Chevrolet's claimed 3.5-second 0–60-mph and 11.4-second quarter-mile times? Maybe a road course such as Willow Springs, where we first drove the hardtop. How about 500 miles of relentlessly straight interstate? Well, as you may have guessed, one of these is not like the others, and it happened to be the choice of Chevrolet. To try out the current range-topping Camaro's droptop iteration, Chevy organized a road trip from Charlotte, North Carolina, down to Daytona, Florida, in time for the 500. Which is great, but we only had a single day to make the 500-mile trip before the cars were shipped out. That meant we didn't really have time to, in the words of Chevrolet's marketing department, "find new roads." However, this relatively dull route did give us an opportunity to experience another aspect of the Camaro ZL1: what it's like to live with in the real world. Before we get too deep into driving impressions, we should cover what's different between the coupe and the convertible. First and foremost is that, unsurprisingly, the convertible weighs more. The droptop has about an extra 200 pounds of weight thanks to the standard chassis reinforcements found on every other convertible in the Camaro lineup plus the top mechanism itself. The convertible has a different rear wing, too. It uses the unit on the standard SS. One of the key reasons for this is that the SS wing has an embedded antenna, which is necessary since there was no good place on the soft top to install an antenna. The convertible also loses the coupe's fancy electronically controlled limited-slip differential. Instead it makes do with a mechanical unit. Finally, the suspension has been slightly re-tuned for the extra weight, and the Performance Data Recorder is not available. Though the option is nice, this is an understandable omission, since not many convertible owners take their cars to the track. The rest of the package matches the coupe. The front fenders are the wide versions to accommodate the 285-mm front tires stopped by six-piston Brembo brakes. The back has 305s and four-piston calipers. And most important, the same 650-horsepower, 650-pound-foot supercharged LT4 V8 is under the hood. Put simply, that engine is a hoot and two halves. It's ready at any moment to belt you up on-ramps and across intersections as fast as you dare. The noise it makes is excellent, too, and it's not entirely uncivilized. In the quietest setting, which is the default for the Touring drive mode and selectable in the infotainment menus, the exhaust is kept quiet, with just a bit of burble reaching your ears, as well as a faint whine from the supercharger. Crank up the revs and that mellow rumbling turns into a hearty, eager bark that overpowers any other nearby sound. It isn't deafening, but will certainly announce your presence to anyone …Hide Full Review