SR5 5.7L V8 4x4 Crew Max 5.6 ft. box 145.7 in. WB
2014 Toyota Tundra

2014 Tundra Photos

MSRP

$36,655
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
 Engine 5.7LV-8
 MPG 13 City / 17 Hwy
 More View All Specs

2014 Tundra Overview

The Toyota Tundra is the automotive version of off-brand Cheerios: it doesn't dominate the market, and it's not the first model people think of when they hear the term "pickup truck." Ford, General Motors and Ram dominate the segment with vehicles that offer ridiculous levels of towing and payload capacities and models loaded with luxury items and primed with tech-rich engines. The off-brands, meanwhile, are led by the Tundra, which while still accounting for six-figure sales (112,732 units in 2013, up from 101,621 in 2012), sits well behind the F-150s and Silverados of the world. After our first drive of the revamped 2014 Tundra, we came away thinking this truck is a total underachiever, aimed at placating Toyota loyalists and doing little to win over new customers. But everybody deserves a second chance, and we thought a week's drive in a different environment might lead to a different – or at least a more fully realized – opinion. While the Tundra might not be an industry leader, it still makes it on many truck buyers' shopping lists. So, should you consider this off-brand pickup truck? To find out, we borrowed a top-of-the-line Tundra Platinum for a week. Read on to see what we found. The Tundra looks brutish. That big, dominating front fascia with its long, wide, non-functional scoop above the grille and LED headlight accents give it an imposing look. The expansive cabin dominates the profile view, and our CrewMax-bodied tester gives the truck an almost out-of-proportion look, because there's tons of room for backseat passengers. From the rear, the chunky taillights and embossed "TUNDRA" in the tailgate add to the truck's bigger-is-better design philosophy. In the cabin, our Platinum-trimmed tester has an almost Lexus-like sensibility. In the cabin, our Platinum-trimmed tester has an almost Lexus-like sensibility. The quilted leather on the dash, doors and seat uppers stands out in an increasingly luxury-oriented truck market. It looks good and feels quite nice to the touch. We also note Toyota has opted for a softer leather on the dash and doors, and something a bit more durable on the seats. The painted plastics used on the dash look good and feel solid, while the soft-touch materials on the upper dash and doors make the Tundra Platinum feel more luxurious. From the driver's seat, visibility is excellent throughout, thanks to the Tundra's high-riding nature, expansive greenhouse and reasonably skinny A-pillars. The tilt-telescopic steering wheel is wrapped in soft leather and is heated, a welcome touch as winter continues to bear down on southeastern Michigan. Power thigh support helps make the front leather seats thoroughly comfortable, too. If you're long-legged, like we are, this is a feature that will prove its worth within the first couple of miles on the road. e'd have no qualms driving long distances in the Tundra. The rear seats aren't uncomfortable – they don't feel like second-class jump seats, like in some other pickups. Anyone we put in the back seat had a similar point of …
Full Review

2014 Tundra Overview

The Toyota Tundra is the automotive version of off-brand Cheerios: it doesn't dominate the market, and it's not the first model people think of when they hear the term "pickup truck." Ford, General Motors and Ram dominate the segment with vehicles that offer ridiculous levels of towing and payload capacities and models loaded with luxury items and primed with tech-rich engines. The off-brands, meanwhile, are led by the Tundra, which while still accounting for six-figure sales (112,732 units in 2013, up from 101,621 in 2012), sits well behind the F-150s and Silverados of the world. After our first drive of the revamped 2014 Tundra, we came away thinking this truck is a total underachiever, aimed at placating Toyota loyalists and doing little to win over new customers. But everybody deserves a second chance, and we thought a week's drive in a different environment might lead to a different – or at least a more fully realized – opinion. While the Tundra might not be an industry leader, it still makes it on many truck buyers' shopping lists. So, should you consider this off-brand pickup truck? To find out, we borrowed a top-of-the-line Tundra Platinum for a week. Read on to see what we found. The Tundra looks brutish. That big, dominating front fascia with its long, wide, non-functional scoop above the grille and LED headlight accents give it an imposing look. The expansive cabin dominates the profile view, and our CrewMax-bodied tester gives the truck an almost out-of-proportion look, because there's tons of room for backseat passengers. From the rear, the chunky taillights and embossed "TUNDRA" in the tailgate add to the truck's bigger-is-better design philosophy. In the cabin, our Platinum-trimmed tester has an almost Lexus-like sensibility. In the cabin, our Platinum-trimmed tester has an almost Lexus-like sensibility. The quilted leather on the dash, doors and seat uppers stands out in an increasingly luxury-oriented truck market. It looks good and feels quite nice to the touch. We also note Toyota has opted for a softer leather on the dash and doors, and something a bit more durable on the seats. The painted plastics used on the dash look good and feel solid, while the soft-touch materials on the upper dash and doors make the Tundra Platinum feel more luxurious. From the driver's seat, visibility is excellent throughout, thanks to the Tundra's high-riding nature, expansive greenhouse and reasonably skinny A-pillars. The tilt-telescopic steering wheel is wrapped in soft leather and is heated, a welcome touch as winter continues to bear down on southeastern Michigan. Power thigh support helps make the front leather seats thoroughly comfortable, too. If you're long-legged, like we are, this is a feature that will prove its worth within the first couple of miles on the road. e'd have no qualms driving long distances in the Tundra. The rear seats aren't uncomfortable – they don't feel like second-class jump seats, like in some other pickups. Anyone we put in the back seat had a similar point of …Hide Full Review