2014 Sierra 1500 Photos

SLT 4x2 Double Cab 6.6 ft. box 143.5 in. WB
2014 GMC Sierra 1500

Big And Boxy Might Be Best As immense fans of the Back to the Future trilogy, we sometimes like to envision an alternate timeline in which General Motors had killed off GMC and kept Pontiac instead. The G8 GXP would still be on the road handily beating German sport sedans costing twice as much, while the lowly G3 would morph into a true subcompact-killer based on what is now the Chevrolet Sonic RS. While we're at it, let's go ahead and imagine the G6 has become the best-selling car in the US and the Torrent crossover is selling 20,000+ units per month. Far-fetched, we know. The thing is, these fanciful statements would have to be true to make the case against keeping GMC. Pontiac may have offered more excitement than GMC, but money talks, and a full line of trucks, crossovers and SUVs have made a lot more money for GM than the arrowhead brand ever did. How much? As we learned last month, about two-thirds of GM's global profits came from its fullsize trucks, and GMC's trucks typically have thicker margins than their Chevrolet counterparts. So rather than reviewing the latest Pontiac G8 ST, here we are driving the new 2014 GMC Sierra 1500. During our first drives of both the 2014 Chevy Silverado and 2014 Sierra, it was immediately clear that these trucks are the best they've ever been in their 54-year histories, but to see how GM's new trucks stack up against the likes of the Ford F-150, Ram 1500, Toyota Tundra and Nissan Titan, we were looking forward to spending a whole week with a fully loaded Sierra SLT Z71 for this review. Sadly, our time with the Sierra was cut short as it had an unexpected date with a flatbed and a trip to the dealership. If nothing else, we learned how well OnStar and Roadside Assistance work. Let's get that out of the way up front: A "vehicle communication problem" left us stranded in a parking lot during a late-night errand. The truck was just fine getting to the store, but upon returning to it in the parking lot, it wouldn't start. Everything seemed to be working fine – lights, gauges and stereo – except that when the key was turned, nothing would happen. No crank. No start. Nothing. Even as the Sierra was being loaded onto the flatbed, we tried one more time to start the truck, but no dice. This made it even more frustrating when as soon as the truck was unloaded at the dealer and the after-hours paperwork was filled out, the truck started up just fine. To be safe, we left it for the dealer to analyze. GM's official response is that our tester experienced a fluke issue with its security system/vehicle immobilizer, though officials have admitted a similar issue had happened once before to another GM-owned Sierra. This isn't the first time a vehicle has left our possession hooked up to a tow truck, but it could very …
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Big And Boxy Might Be Best As immense fans of the Back to the Future trilogy, we sometimes like to envision an alternate timeline in which General Motors had killed off GMC and kept Pontiac instead. The G8 GXP would still be on the road handily beating German sport sedans costing twice as much, while the lowly G3 would morph into a true subcompact-killer based on what is now the Chevrolet Sonic RS. While we're at it, let's go ahead and imagine the G6 has become the best-selling car in the US and the Torrent crossover is selling 20,000+ units per month. Far-fetched, we know. The thing is, these fanciful statements would have to be true to make the case against keeping GMC. Pontiac may have offered more excitement than GMC, but money talks, and a full line of trucks, crossovers and SUVs have made a lot more money for GM than the arrowhead brand ever did. How much? As we learned last month, about two-thirds of GM's global profits came from its fullsize trucks, and GMC's trucks typically have thicker margins than their Chevrolet counterparts. So rather than reviewing the latest Pontiac G8 ST, here we are driving the new 2014 GMC Sierra 1500. During our first drives of both the 2014 Chevy Silverado and 2014 Sierra, it was immediately clear that these trucks are the best they've ever been in their 54-year histories, but to see how GM's new trucks stack up against the likes of the Ford F-150, Ram 1500, Toyota Tundra and Nissan Titan, we were looking forward to spending a whole week with a fully loaded Sierra SLT Z71 for this review. Sadly, our time with the Sierra was cut short as it had an unexpected date with a flatbed and a trip to the dealership. If nothing else, we learned how well OnStar and Roadside Assistance work. Let's get that out of the way up front: A "vehicle communication problem" left us stranded in a parking lot during a late-night errand. The truck was just fine getting to the store, but upon returning to it in the parking lot, it wouldn't start. Everything seemed to be working fine – lights, gauges and stereo – except that when the key was turned, nothing would happen. No crank. No start. Nothing. Even as the Sierra was being loaded onto the flatbed, we tried one more time to start the truck, but no dice. This made it even more frustrating when as soon as the truck was unloaded at the dealer and the after-hours paperwork was filled out, the truck started up just fine. To be safe, we left it for the dealer to analyze. GM's official response is that our tester experienced a fluke issue with its security system/vehicle immobilizer, though officials have admitted a similar issue had happened once before to another GM-owned Sierra. This isn't the first time a vehicle has left our possession hooked up to a tow truck, but it could very …
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Retail Price

$39,400
MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

N/A
Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 5.3LV-8
MPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
Seating 6 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd auto w/OD
Power 355 @ 5600 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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