Supercharged 4dr All-wheel Drive
2006 Land Rover Range Rover Sport

MSRP ?

$69,535
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EngineEngine 4.2LV-8
MPGMPG 13 City / 18 Hwy
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2006 Range Rover Sport Overview

Land Rover's Range Rover Sport borrows liberally from the Green Oval's internecine parts bin, and as such, it's got some work to do to justify its premium pricepoint. As laid out in 'Day 1-2'  and 'Day 3-4', we've established that the newest Landie cribs the lion's share of its mechanicals from the significantly less-expensive LR3, while trading on the big daddy Range Rover's aesthetics and badge. But beyond the obvious styling ace it possesses, Rover pledges a more visceral steer and a bit more on-road competence. Indeed, the Supercharged iteration appears to make good on the promised bravado-- it's the fastest production vehicle the company has ever built... capable of a fairly remarkable 140 mph, and possessing trick bits like actively-manipulated front and rear sway bars to enable flatter cornering. But the Roots [blower] rockin' iteration whacks wallets to the tune of $70,000, and that's only about $5,000 shy of the Big Kahuna. And besides, we've got the HSE. (Lots more photographs and the Sports' final judgement after the jump!) While one might be inclined to think from Rover's posturing that the Sport's home is in the twisties, it's actually most in its element on the highway. On the interstate is where the 'base' 300 horsepower 4.4-liter V8 provides plenty of grunt for passing, and where its quiet interior, cosseting air suspension and supportive seats are a treat for those staring down long stretches of bitumen. This isn't to say that the Rover isn't a capable corner carver in its own right, it's merely to pronounce that the SUV's true métier is the open road, where owners can waft about in suitably imperial fashion. This is particularly true during inclement weather, where lighthouse-grade bi-xenon headlamps ('adaptive' on our luxury-package equipped HSE) set the table for swift, safe travel, and the Goodyear Wrangler F1-2 mud-and-snow rated tires grab consistently at all four corners, thanks in part to standard traction and stability control systems. In point of fact, we can't remember the last time we felt so confident driving an SUV at an elevated rate of speed during such lousy weather. But when the tarmac turns from fettuccini to rotini, mental cumulonimbi threaten to darken the Sport's prospects. Yes, its speed-sensitive variable-ratio rack puts up the good fight, and the six-ratio automatic has a manual mode that thoughtfully gooses the throttle when rapidly downshifting (as an enthusiast might wish of a three-pedal array).  But ultimately, whether its down to the middle-of the-road cornering rubber or the occasionally grabby brakes, Sport drivers will find themselves more likely to slacken the pace and call up old friends Harmon and Kardon. Simply put, a similarly-priced BMW X5 4.4i or Porsche Cayenne S is a better dance partner when there's an uptick in the tempo. An available manual transmission, a dual-clutch setup (à la VAG's DSG system), or even a set of gearchange paddles or buttons might sufficiently increase the entertainment quotient, but Rover's option sheet affords no such provisions. …
Full Review

2006 Range Rover Sport Overview

Land Rover's Range Rover Sport borrows liberally from the Green Oval's internecine parts bin, and as such, it's got some work to do to justify its premium pricepoint. As laid out in 'Day 1-2'  and 'Day 3-4', we've established that the newest Landie cribs the lion's share of its mechanicals from the significantly less-expensive LR3, while trading on the big daddy Range Rover's aesthetics and badge. But beyond the obvious styling ace it possesses, Rover pledges a more visceral steer and a bit more on-road competence. Indeed, the Supercharged iteration appears to make good on the promised bravado-- it's the fastest production vehicle the company has ever built... capable of a fairly remarkable 140 mph, and possessing trick bits like actively-manipulated front and rear sway bars to enable flatter cornering. But the Roots [blower] rockin' iteration whacks wallets to the tune of $70,000, and that's only about $5,000 shy of the Big Kahuna. And besides, we've got the HSE. (Lots more photographs and the Sports' final judgement after the jump!) While one might be inclined to think from Rover's posturing that the Sport's home is in the twisties, it's actually most in its element on the highway. On the interstate is where the 'base' 300 horsepower 4.4-liter V8 provides plenty of grunt for passing, and where its quiet interior, cosseting air suspension and supportive seats are a treat for those staring down long stretches of bitumen. This isn't to say that the Rover isn't a capable corner carver in its own right, it's merely to pronounce that the SUV's true métier is the open road, where owners can waft about in suitably imperial fashion. This is particularly true during inclement weather, where lighthouse-grade bi-xenon headlamps ('adaptive' on our luxury-package equipped HSE) set the table for swift, safe travel, and the Goodyear Wrangler F1-2 mud-and-snow rated tires grab consistently at all four corners, thanks in part to standard traction and stability control systems. In point of fact, we can't remember the last time we felt so confident driving an SUV at an elevated rate of speed during such lousy weather. But when the tarmac turns from fettuccini to rotini, mental cumulonimbi threaten to darken the Sport's prospects. Yes, its speed-sensitive variable-ratio rack puts up the good fight, and the six-ratio automatic has a manual mode that thoughtfully gooses the throttle when rapidly downshifting (as an enthusiast might wish of a three-pedal array).  But ultimately, whether its down to the middle-of the-road cornering rubber or the occasionally grabby brakes, Sport drivers will find themselves more likely to slacken the pace and call up old friends Harmon and Kardon. Simply put, a similarly-priced BMW X5 4.4i or Porsche Cayenne S is a better dance partner when there's an uptick in the tempo. An available manual transmission, a dual-clutch setup (à la VAG's DSG system), or even a set of gearchange paddles or buttons might sufficiently increase the entertainment quotient, but Rover's option sheet affords no such provisions. …Hide Full Review