ETC
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
A great big A8 with a long wheelbase and all-wheel-drive is just the thing for a serious player with an oligarch-grade bankroll and the need to get to important corporate meetings during the worst Colorado snowstorms, and we're betting that's how this 15-year-old A8 L's original owner saw it. The problem with cars like this is that big, complicated, expensive machinery tends to develop big, complicated, expensive problems once the aging process sets in, and third or fourth owners of high-end German luxury cars tend to lack the resources needed to keep those cars going.



So, those S-Classes and 7-Series and A8s end up in a place like this when something expensive breaks at age 15. This one, which has a very straight body and decent interior, now sits in its final parking space, among the Daewoo Leganzas and Volvo 850s in the imports section of a Denver self-service yard.



If you're good with the wrenches and have some Audi expertise, you can't beat the luxury-per-buck deal of a solid 10-to-15-year-old A8; the price for a runner tends to be about the same as that for a tattered Corolla of the same age.



This car's base price was $69,946 in 2001, or just over 95 grand in inflation-adjusted 2016 bucks, and it's packed full of leading-edge engineering that's still fairly advanced today.

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