• Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
Volkswagen may not be the only German automaker ensnared by this whole diesel debacle. The latest reports suggest that BMW could be guilty of the same offense. According to Bloomberg, citing a report from Germany's own Auto Bild magazine, the X3 could be over the European legal limit for emissions.

The report suggests that a BMW X3 xDrive20d registered tailpipe emissions more than 11 times the limit under testing by the International Council on Clean Transportation. The council is the same that triggered the investigation into Volkswagen that led to the automaker's admission that it cheated on emissions tests for its diesel vehicles and the subsequent resignation of its chief executive.

Volkswagen admitted to installing software that initiates additional emissions controlling measures when it detects that the vehicle is being tested. For its part, however, BMW denies that it has any such similar system in place, noting that many of its vehicles have passed testing by the same organization.

Whatever the truth in BMW's case, it may not emerge unscathed. Bloomberg reports that the company's stock fell as much as 9.7 percent – the most it has lost in over four years – amid concerns that it could be implicated in the scandal as well. Shares in rival automaker Daimler also dropped by 5.8 percent. Volkswagen has already lost over $20 billion in market value in the midst of the scandal. The German government and European Union are considering implementing more restrictive standards and more thorough testing on diesel engines in order to prevent this sort of thing from recurring.

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