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According to a new study from DUH and the ICCT, Renault may have cheated on emissions tests for the Espace diesel minivan, which may produce 25 times the legal limit for noxious emissions.

EPA May Have Been More Vigilant Than EU

Some European regulators may have known about cheat software as far back as 2011.

BMW, Peugeot Models Also Notable For Mileage Gap

Mercedes-Benz is the most common practitioner of fuel-economy overstatements, according to report.

Auto Bild clarifies a report concerning BMW, saying that even though the X3 diesel exceeds European emission regulations, it doesn't mean BMW cheated on emissions tests.

BMW and its X3 sport-utility vehicle could be caught up in the same scandal that has hit Volkswagen, the speculation of which has already affected its stock market value.

PEMS Testing Shows Higher-Than-Allowed NOx Emissions

A study analyzing real-world diesel vehicle emissions finds that NOx levels from modern engines far exceed the mandated limits. However, the carbon monoxide and total carbon hydrogen numbers are where they should be.

European automakers are apparently a little off in their collective emissions ratings for their vehicles. Way off, actually. To the tune of $580 in refueling costs per driver. The vehicles likely emitted 38 percent more CO2 than what they were rated at, according to Bloomberg News, which cites a report by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), and that leads to the extra refueling costs.

BMW and Volkswagen are taking differing political tacks to address stricter European emissions standards that will kick in by the end of the decade, but the two German automakers appear to be moving in lockstep when it comes to not reporting accurate CO2 emissions numbers.

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