• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
Koenigsegg is on the rise. Previously content building less than one vehicle each month, the Swedish supercar manufacturer arrived in Geneva this year with two new models it will build in parallel for the first time. But as impressive as the new Agera RS and Regera are, they're hardly the end of the story for Koenigsegg.

Speaking to Top Gear in Geneva, Christian von Koenigsegg outlined some interesting new plans for the future. And chief among them is a potential four-door model. Though details remain scarce, Koenigsegg says he envisions launching a four-door model "within the next five years, possibly earlier." Just what that would look like, we don't know, but it would surely leave the Porsche Panamera in its dust and pick up where the aborted Bugatti Galibier project left off.

The company is also experimenting with a radical new engine design that would do away with the camshaft and the throttle body altogether and replace them with direct valve control instead. The system would enable infinitely variable valve timing, cylinder deactivation under lower loads and further flexibility in determining the engine's character and power delivery. The idea may seem radical, but so did the notion of a supercar without a transmission until Koenigsegg revealed the new Regera.

As we've reported previously, Koenigsegg is also out for blood at the Nürburgring, where it's taking the One:1 in pursuit of a lap record this summer. Christian also leaves the door open to racing, but says that the current format of GT3 racing with Balance of Performance adjustment would mean that any racecar it would build – like the aborted CCGT from five or six years ago – could be no faster than a far more affordable Porsche.

Speaking of which, Koenigsegg dismissed the idea of going as far down-market as to build a road car to compete with the likes of the Porsche 911 or Ferrari 488. Though Christian feels he and his company could offer a compelling competitor in those segments, it has no intention of going after them. The company has been rumored, however, to be splitting the difference with a new supercar in the $650k category.

Related Video:

Koenigsegg Regera | 2015 Geneva Motor Show | Autoblog Short Cuts

Share This Photo X