Leather Group 4dr Sedan
2013 Buick Verano

MSRP ?

$26,755
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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 32 Hwy
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2013 Verano Overview

Look Who Just Raised The Bar In The Compact Entry-Level Luxury Segment We first slid behind the wheel of the Buick Verano, the American automaker's entrant in the $25,000 compact luxury segment, one year ago in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest. After motoring through scenic Oregon, we boarded our flight back home quite impressed with the small four-door. In our First Drive review, we mentioned that the General Motors offering had "exceeded our expectations" and that its combination of features and appointments "made a compelling argument for itself." Our one gripe, however, was aimed at the Verano's standard naturally aspirated (NA) four-cylinder engine. With 180 horsepower and 171 pound-feet of torque, we found its performance rather lethargic in the 3,300-pound sedan. As we noted, "The power from the 2.4-liter was adequate, but much of its steam was lost above legal speeds when attempting two-lane passing maneuvers." For 2013, Buick has handily addressed the power deficit by fitting its sedan with GM's turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder – an action that packs another 70 horses under the hood. Of course, there were other upgrades and enhancements to accompany the additional muscle. We just spent a day in the heart of the Bluegrass State, on the other side of the country, putting the 2013 Buick Verano Turbo through its paces. Fall is a near-perfect time to visit Kentucky, and the Buick proved to be an excellent companion for touring the land of horses, tobacco and those wonderful bourbon distilleries. The Verano Turbo is not to be confused with a dedicated athletic sport sedan. Before we dive into the Verano Turbo, it is important to understand exactly where the four-door is positioned – and where it is not. According to Buick, the Verano Turbo is an entry-level luxury sedan, and the addition of the turbocharged engine is meant to give it more power and a slightly sportier pretense. Its main competitors include the Acura ILX, Audi A3 and, perhaps a bit curiously, the Lexus IS250. Officials told us in no uncertain terms that the Verano Turbo is not to be confused with a dedicated athletic sport sedan like the company's Regal GS. Put another way, the Regal GS is specifically tuned for enthusiasts while the Verano, quite bluntly, is not. The Verano Turbo is configured with the automaker's Ecotec 2.0-liter turbocharged inline four-cylinder engine, a nearly identical version of which is found under the hood of the Cadillac ATS and aforementioned Regal. The direct-injected mill is slightly retuned to develop 250 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard, with buyers offered the choice between a six-speed automatic (GM's Hydra-Matic 6T50) and a no-cost six-speed manual (F-40) transmission. While the curb weight with the automatic is about 30 pounds heavier (3,520 pounds vs. 3,550 pounds), GM says both models will accelerate to 60 mph in about 6.2 seconds. That figure makes it the quickest sedan in its little segment. A six-second sprint is a tremendous improvement in performance, but it won't cost owners dearly …
Full Review

2013 Verano Overview

Look Who Just Raised The Bar In The Compact Entry-Level Luxury Segment We first slid behind the wheel of the Buick Verano, the American automaker's entrant in the $25,000 compact luxury segment, one year ago in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest. After motoring through scenic Oregon, we boarded our flight back home quite impressed with the small four-door. In our First Drive review, we mentioned that the General Motors offering had "exceeded our expectations" and that its combination of features and appointments "made a compelling argument for itself." Our one gripe, however, was aimed at the Verano's standard naturally aspirated (NA) four-cylinder engine. With 180 horsepower and 171 pound-feet of torque, we found its performance rather lethargic in the 3,300-pound sedan. As we noted, "The power from the 2.4-liter was adequate, but much of its steam was lost above legal speeds when attempting two-lane passing maneuvers." For 2013, Buick has handily addressed the power deficit by fitting its sedan with GM's turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder – an action that packs another 70 horses under the hood. Of course, there were other upgrades and enhancements to accompany the additional muscle. We just spent a day in the heart of the Bluegrass State, on the other side of the country, putting the 2013 Buick Verano Turbo through its paces. Fall is a near-perfect time to visit Kentucky, and the Buick proved to be an excellent companion for touring the land of horses, tobacco and those wonderful bourbon distilleries. The Verano Turbo is not to be confused with a dedicated athletic sport sedan. Before we dive into the Verano Turbo, it is important to understand exactly where the four-door is positioned – and where it is not. According to Buick, the Verano Turbo is an entry-level luxury sedan, and the addition of the turbocharged engine is meant to give it more power and a slightly sportier pretense. Its main competitors include the Acura ILX, Audi A3 and, perhaps a bit curiously, the Lexus IS250. Officials told us in no uncertain terms that the Verano Turbo is not to be confused with a dedicated athletic sport sedan like the company's Regal GS. Put another way, the Regal GS is specifically tuned for enthusiasts while the Verano, quite bluntly, is not. The Verano Turbo is configured with the automaker's Ecotec 2.0-liter turbocharged inline four-cylinder engine, a nearly identical version of which is found under the hood of the Cadillac ATS and aforementioned Regal. The direct-injected mill is slightly retuned to develop 250 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard, with buyers offered the choice between a six-speed automatic (GM's Hydra-Matic 6T50) and a no-cost six-speed manual (F-40) transmission. While the curb weight with the automatic is about 30 pounds heavier (3,520 pounds vs. 3,550 pounds), GM says both models will accelerate to 60 mph in about 6.2 seconds. That figure makes it the quickest sedan in its little segment. A six-second sprint is a tremendous improvement in performance, but it won't cost owners dearly …Hide Full Review