2012 Buick Verano

MSRP ?

$22,585 - $25,965
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
Hassle Free Quote
Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 32 Hwy
More More View All Specs

2012 Verano Overview

GM Seeks To Define Compact Luxury Very, Very Quietly Every six months or so, we drive a car that exceeds our expectations. Such is the case with the all-new 2012 Buick Verano, the American automaker's fresh new entrant into the $25,000 compact luxury segment. Wait a minute – what's this so-called "$25,000 compact luxury" segment? Buick explains that there is a window of opportunity for a small luxury sedan priced below the Audi A3, Lexus IS 250 and Acura TSX sedan, but above the Honda Civic, Ford Focus and Chevrolet Cruze. After identifying the void, Buick's objective was to develop a vehicle that was quieter, more luxurious and better equipped than anything close to its $23,470 cost of entry. Even loaded with every option, the Verano won't exceed $29,000, a figure which cleanly undercuts all of the aforementioned luxury imports by several thousand dollars. Buick flew us up to Portland, Oregon, last week for an opportunity to put more than 250 miles on its new Verano in the spectacularly scenic Northwest. We arrived intrigued, and left very impressed. Buick's third new model in as many years debuted at this year's Detroit Auto Show. Its first compact since the Buick Skylark was dropped in 1999, the Verano (Spanish for "summer") is built on General Motors' Delta II platform, an architecture shared with the Chevrolet Cruze. But don't be mistaken that this is just another one of GM's ill-advised exercises in badge engineering – it isn't. The Verano shares some suspension underpinnings with its economy-oriented cousin, but the powertrain and cabin appointments scream upmarket Regal - or even baby LaCrosse. Let's peel back the sheetmetal and take a closer look inside. A turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder model will arrive sometime in 2012. Set behind the signature waterfall grille and beneath the silly do-nothing portholes on the hood is GM's Ecotech 2.4-liter four-cylinder powerplant that's shared with the Regal. A larger engine than the Cruze's 1.4-liter turbo and 1.8-liter normally aspirated four-cylinder choices, this all-aluminum engine features direct injection and continuous variable valve timing on the intake and exhaust to deliver 180 horsepower at 6,700 rpm and 171 pound-feet of torque at 4,900 rpm on regular fuel. The naturally aspirated, E85-capable engine is mated to a conventional six-speed automatic transmission (Hydra-Matic 6T45) sending power to the front wheels. With a curb weight of 3,300 pounds, Buick says the Verano will hit 60 mph from a standstill in 8.6 seconds – respectable for a vehicle promising an EPA rating of 21 mpg city and 31 mpg on the highway. If you are seeking a bit more punch, you'll want to wait for the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder model that Buick says will arrive sometime in 2012. The front suspension is independent with MacPherson struts, while the rear is configured with a torsion beam augmented by a Watts Z-link design to keep things in check. There are disc brakes at all four corners, with single-piston steel calipers clamping down on 11.8-inch ventilated rotors up front and …
Full Review

2012 Verano Overview

GM Seeks To Define Compact Luxury Very, Very Quietly Every six months or so, we drive a car that exceeds our expectations. Such is the case with the all-new 2012 Buick Verano, the American automaker's fresh new entrant into the $25,000 compact luxury segment. Wait a minute – what's this so-called "$25,000 compact luxury" segment? Buick explains that there is a window of opportunity for a small luxury sedan priced below the Audi A3, Lexus IS 250 and Acura TSX sedan, but above the Honda Civic, Ford Focus and Chevrolet Cruze. After identifying the void, Buick's objective was to develop a vehicle that was quieter, more luxurious and better equipped than anything close to its $23,470 cost of entry. Even loaded with every option, the Verano won't exceed $29,000, a figure which cleanly undercuts all of the aforementioned luxury imports by several thousand dollars. Buick flew us up to Portland, Oregon, last week for an opportunity to put more than 250 miles on its new Verano in the spectacularly scenic Northwest. We arrived intrigued, and left very impressed. Buick's third new model in as many years debuted at this year's Detroit Auto Show. Its first compact since the Buick Skylark was dropped in 1999, the Verano (Spanish for "summer") is built on General Motors' Delta II platform, an architecture shared with the Chevrolet Cruze. But don't be mistaken that this is just another one of GM's ill-advised exercises in badge engineering – it isn't. The Verano shares some suspension underpinnings with its economy-oriented cousin, but the powertrain and cabin appointments scream upmarket Regal - or even baby LaCrosse. Let's peel back the sheetmetal and take a closer look inside. A turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder model will arrive sometime in 2012. Set behind the signature waterfall grille and beneath the silly do-nothing portholes on the hood is GM's Ecotech 2.4-liter four-cylinder powerplant that's shared with the Regal. A larger engine than the Cruze's 1.4-liter turbo and 1.8-liter normally aspirated four-cylinder choices, this all-aluminum engine features direct injection and continuous variable valve timing on the intake and exhaust to deliver 180 horsepower at 6,700 rpm and 171 pound-feet of torque at 4,900 rpm on regular fuel. The naturally aspirated, E85-capable engine is mated to a conventional six-speed automatic transmission (Hydra-Matic 6T45) sending power to the front wheels. With a curb weight of 3,300 pounds, Buick says the Verano will hit 60 mph from a standstill in 8.6 seconds – respectable for a vehicle promising an EPA rating of 21 mpg city and 31 mpg on the highway. If you are seeking a bit more punch, you'll want to wait for the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder model that Buick says will arrive sometime in 2012. The front suspension is independent with MacPherson struts, while the rear is configured with a torsion beam augmented by a Watts Z-link design to keep things in check. There are disc brakes at all four corners, with single-piston steel calipers clamping down on 11.8-inch ventilated rotors up front and …Hide Full Review