2010 Volkswagen Golf

MSRP ?

$17,620 - $22,760
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-5
MPG MPG 22 City / 30 Hwy
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2010 Golf Overview

2010 Volkswagen Golf TDI – click above for high-res image gallery It's time for American consumers to stop being scared of small diesel cars. Currently, we can't think of a single automaker that isn't shelling out bags of money to research and develop new hybrid powertrains – cars that are efficient first and fun-to-drive second (or third, or fourth). Diesel vehicles, on the other hand, offer a different sort of solution. Gobs of torque delivered at low revs and impressive fuel economy work together without sacrificing too much in the way of driving pleasure. Besides, does anyone really want to live in "One Nation Under Prius?" Volkswagen introduced us to its new Jetta TDI a little over a year ago, proving that clean diesel technology offers a way forward for anyone who gives a hoot about driver involvement. Now, the automaker has fitted its well-received 2.0-liter diesel engine in the all-new sixth-generation Golf. Can this hatch prove to America that it's possible to fuse efficiency and enthusiasm together in a high-quality package? Can you really have your cake and eat it, too? Hit the jump to find out. %Gallery-89954% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the 2010 Golf is simple yet stylish. Gone is the chrome-heavy nose of the last-generation car, and while the overall shape hasn't changed a whole lot, it's important to note that the MkVI Golf doesn't share a single piece of bodywork with the MkV Rabbit (yes, we're glad the name has been changed back, too). What Volkswagen has done is something that's really underappreciated – make a car that's visually appealing while not being over the top. These days, it seems that some automakers put too much effort into creating bold design for little more than shock value, and it's refreshing to see that Volkswagen stands by its core goal of attractive simplicity. TDI models come standard with a more robust kit of appearance extras, including foglamps and ten-spoke wheels wrapped in 225/45 17-inch Continental ContiProContact tires. The larger alloys are very sharp, and having the wheel wells pushed out to all four corners lends the hatch a more aggressive stance. What's more, the MkVI Golf is one inch wider than the outgoing Rabbit, but 0.4 inches shorter in length, and while these minor dimension adjustments aren't immediately noticeable when walking up to it, they indeed improve the platform's overall dynamics once you're plowing down the road. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. To reiterate on a phrase we used earlier, a theme of attractive simplicity is indeed carried over into the VW's interior styling, with an added dollop of refinement, to boot. If there's one thing we'll never complain about regarding Volkswagen products, it's the high quality feel that's put into every interior across the automaker's lineup. Every touchable surface in the Golf's cabin feels class-above great, and if you take time to really study every part of the cockpit, Volkswagen's attention to detail is easily recognized. Even the …
Full Review

2010 Golf Overview

2010 Volkswagen Golf TDI – click above for high-res image gallery It's time for American consumers to stop being scared of small diesel cars. Currently, we can't think of a single automaker that isn't shelling out bags of money to research and develop new hybrid powertrains – cars that are efficient first and fun-to-drive second (or third, or fourth). Diesel vehicles, on the other hand, offer a different sort of solution. Gobs of torque delivered at low revs and impressive fuel economy work together without sacrificing too much in the way of driving pleasure. Besides, does anyone really want to live in "One Nation Under Prius?" Volkswagen introduced us to its new Jetta TDI a little over a year ago, proving that clean diesel technology offers a way forward for anyone who gives a hoot about driver involvement. Now, the automaker has fitted its well-received 2.0-liter diesel engine in the all-new sixth-generation Golf. Can this hatch prove to America that it's possible to fuse efficiency and enthusiasm together in a high-quality package? Can you really have your cake and eat it, too? Hit the jump to find out. %Gallery-89954% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the 2010 Golf is simple yet stylish. Gone is the chrome-heavy nose of the last-generation car, and while the overall shape hasn't changed a whole lot, it's important to note that the MkVI Golf doesn't share a single piece of bodywork with the MkV Rabbit (yes, we're glad the name has been changed back, too). What Volkswagen has done is something that's really underappreciated – make a car that's visually appealing while not being over the top. These days, it seems that some automakers put too much effort into creating bold design for little more than shock value, and it's refreshing to see that Volkswagen stands by its core goal of attractive simplicity. TDI models come standard with a more robust kit of appearance extras, including foglamps and ten-spoke wheels wrapped in 225/45 17-inch Continental ContiProContact tires. The larger alloys are very sharp, and having the wheel wells pushed out to all four corners lends the hatch a more aggressive stance. What's more, the MkVI Golf is one inch wider than the outgoing Rabbit, but 0.4 inches shorter in length, and while these minor dimension adjustments aren't immediately noticeable when walking up to it, they indeed improve the platform's overall dynamics once you're plowing down the road. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. To reiterate on a phrase we used earlier, a theme of attractive simplicity is indeed carried over into the VW's interior styling, with an added dollop of refinement, to boot. If there's one thing we'll never complain about regarding Volkswagen products, it's the high quality feel that's put into every interior across the automaker's lineup. Every touchable surface in the Golf's cabin feels class-above great, and if you take time to really study every part of the cockpit, Volkswagen's attention to detail is easily recognized. Even the …Hide Full Review