2008 Subaru Tribeca

MSRP ?

$29,995 - $33,595
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 3.6LH-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 21 Hwy
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2008 Tribeca Overview

"It looks like a puppy," my wife said upon first setting eyes on the 2008 Subaru Tribeca. That's an apt description of any Subaru; they usually feel quite eager from behind the wheel, and they're trusty companions. The new front end on the Tribeca is more bland than the outgoing aviation-inspired look, but that hasn't dulled the inherent goodness of this big CUV. The power unit has also seen upgrades. B9-era Tribecas (the alphanumeric has been dropped for '08) had 3.0 liters of horizontally opposed 6 cylinder to haul 4300 pounds. Power delivery was on the revvy side, so maximum torque didn't arrive until you wound it up a bit. 2008 brings more than a half-liter capacity bump, making the Tribeca feel more sprightly with not only more grunt, but also revised delivery characteristics that better suit most drivers. %Gallery-4374% The Tribeca's styling has had much of its polarizing uniqueness beaten out of it with a bland stick. The most dramatic changes are up front, where the original face's headlight tunnels and three-piece grille have given way to a far less distinctive frontispiece. In the interest of quieting detractors, the Tribeca has tiptoed to the precipice of anonymity, but thankfully, some of the interesting detailing in the shape pulls it back. Glance quickly, though, and you may mistake it for a DCX minivan. The rump has also come in for a nip and tuck. Gone is the inset on the lower portion of the hatch, the taillamps have been reshaped, and the rear bumper's facsia has been heavily revised. Away from the nose and tail, much of the ALFA-esque styling has escaped unscathed. The flanks still carry sculpting that catches light and focuses your gaze. The rear quarter windows have been enlarged, a boon for visibility, and the D-pillar comes away successfully tamed. Even with its funkectomy, we still find the Tribeca interesting to look at, and the vehicle continues to stand apart in a crowded field. Inside and out, the Tribeca is unabashed about the dashing line it cuts. The sides are hewn in a way that catches light and dribbles reflections like liquid. The more you gaze at the Tribeca, the more you like it, even with the higher nose and more traditional (and large) grille. Inside, the swoopy dash and fresh design still remains. The materials are well done, if more workaday than luxo-plush. Silver plastic trim always raises questions about longevity, but what we saw in the belly of the beast appeared like it'd ward off scuffs and nastiness. Instrumentation is clean and easily read, with electroluminescent gauge faces. We were less than impressed by the "information center" LCD screen at the top of the center stack; what's so wrong about keeping feedback local to the controls? The speedo and tach sit at the bottom of two nacelles and the temperature and fuel gauges flank the circular tunnels. The treatment adds a bit of levity to the often-blah territory of vital information delivery. The dance …
Full Review

2008 Tribeca Overview

"It looks like a puppy," my wife said upon first setting eyes on the 2008 Subaru Tribeca. That's an apt description of any Subaru; they usually feel quite eager from behind the wheel, and they're trusty companions. The new front end on the Tribeca is more bland than the outgoing aviation-inspired look, but that hasn't dulled the inherent goodness of this big CUV. The power unit has also seen upgrades. B9-era Tribecas (the alphanumeric has been dropped for '08) had 3.0 liters of horizontally opposed 6 cylinder to haul 4300 pounds. Power delivery was on the revvy side, so maximum torque didn't arrive until you wound it up a bit. 2008 brings more than a half-liter capacity bump, making the Tribeca feel more sprightly with not only more grunt, but also revised delivery characteristics that better suit most drivers. %Gallery-4374% The Tribeca's styling has had much of its polarizing uniqueness beaten out of it with a bland stick. The most dramatic changes are up front, where the original face's headlight tunnels and three-piece grille have given way to a far less distinctive frontispiece. In the interest of quieting detractors, the Tribeca has tiptoed to the precipice of anonymity, but thankfully, some of the interesting detailing in the shape pulls it back. Glance quickly, though, and you may mistake it for a DCX minivan. The rump has also come in for a nip and tuck. Gone is the inset on the lower portion of the hatch, the taillamps have been reshaped, and the rear bumper's facsia has been heavily revised. Away from the nose and tail, much of the ALFA-esque styling has escaped unscathed. The flanks still carry sculpting that catches light and focuses your gaze. The rear quarter windows have been enlarged, a boon for visibility, and the D-pillar comes away successfully tamed. Even with its funkectomy, we still find the Tribeca interesting to look at, and the vehicle continues to stand apart in a crowded field. Inside and out, the Tribeca is unabashed about the dashing line it cuts. The sides are hewn in a way that catches light and dribbles reflections like liquid. The more you gaze at the Tribeca, the more you like it, even with the higher nose and more traditional (and large) grille. Inside, the swoopy dash and fresh design still remains. The materials are well done, if more workaday than luxo-plush. Silver plastic trim always raises questions about longevity, but what we saw in the belly of the beast appeared like it'd ward off scuffs and nastiness. Instrumentation is clean and easily read, with electroluminescent gauge faces. We were less than impressed by the "information center" LCD screen at the top of the center stack; what's so wrong about keeping feedback local to the controls? The speedo and tach sit at the bottom of two nacelles and the temperature and fuel gauges flank the circular tunnels. The treatment adds a bit of levity to the often-blah territory of vital information delivery. The dance …Hide Full Review