Or maybe not. Back in July, we reported that Ferrari's initial public offering could come any day, based on what FCA honcho Sergio Marchionne told reporters at an international economic forum. Marchionne himself ensured investors that the Maranello automaker was "days away" from filing the paperwork. That didn't happen.

Now it's October, and the rumormill is churning about all things Ferrari IPO on the news that the company has filed amended IPO documents with the SEC on September 22. Like last time, the launch is apparently imminent – as early as today, reports CNBC – and sources are hearing an offer of $1 billion in stock, or roughly 10 percent of what FCA believes Ferrari to be worth. Back in July, Marchionne insisted that Ferrari was worth as much as $11 billion, despite experts at the time pointing out that this was much higher than even the company's internal assessment of the brand's value.

Bloomberg is also reporting that demand for Ferrari stock may exceed supply by as much as 10 times, even before the IPO. Much of this value (as much as half) is derived from the brand as intellectual property, as opposed to its assets or profitability. Part of the brand value equation is Marchionne's attempt to reposition Ferrari as a "luxury" brand, as Business Insider notes – the word "luxury" is mentioned 151 times in the document. The broad universe of branded Ferrari goods, like luxury clothing and toys, are a strong illustration of Ferrari's power as a brand.

For traditionalists and Ferrari fans jittery at the thought of their beloved manufacturer subject to the whims of shareholders, a few calming notes. Tech Times reports that the documents confirm that Ferrari will remain incorporated as an Italian company. More importantly, there's no indication at present that Ferrari's new emphasis on "luxury" will change their product plans, meaning ever-faster exotic cars will continue to roll out of Maranello for now.

Related Video:


The List Extras: Visit The Birthplace of Ferrari


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • From Our Partners

    You May Like
    Links by Zergnet
    Share This Photo X